The creek is drowning you guys.

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tiredofspam wrote:

After I make a bench I'll practice my joinery. Unfortunately I can't use plywood due to sensitivity--at least not new stuff. This is not really intended to be a heavy duty bench. That's another project. But if I get racking, I will upgrade to a heavier stretcher as you suggested. Thank you.
Bill

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Sensitivity to what? Formaldehyde, urea, phenol, or what? Have you tried the "organic" ply from a Green supplier? (Or bamboo plywood? It's beautiful.)

I'd be more worried about tipping, Bill.
-- Shake off all the fears of servile prejudices, under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call on her tribunal for every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason than that of blindfolded fear. -- Thomas Jefferson
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wrote:

For materials that outgas for a while when new I typically put them in a warm place with a lot of ventilation for a while before bringing them into a closed environment. That goes for sheet goods, polyester fiber fill quilt batting my wife uses, new shower curtain liners, carpet type rugs, etc. About 22 years ago I had flu like symptoms for many months before I figured out it was chemical out gassing that was making me ill... I threw away the new pillows for my bed and the symptoms disappeared!
John
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

I learned my lesson through manufactured (assemble yourself) furniture. I was in disbelief that the mere presense of a "piece of furniture" could "make me sick" (sweating, shortness of breath). But the evidence was undeniable. It took me a long time to figure out "out-gassing" too. In our society, it is a truth "swept under the rug". I still can't say I know all of the products that are "bad" (nor I think, does anyone), but I proceed now in an aware manner.
Bill

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Larry Jaques wrote:

Formaldehyde. Home Depot wells some Formaldehyde-free plywood. It is lighter-weight, doesn't get rave reviews and it is pricey, but I'll probably try it in the future anyway. I'll keep my eyes open for other sources too, as you suggest.
Bill

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Bill here is my workbench http://imgur.com/a/YbWt2#0
You will see the current and previous workbenches. Let me explain the current... Big ass stretchers. I do a lot of hand planing and I didn't want racking.
I see benches as someone provided a link to where the stretcher is on the top and bottom. That serves no purpose and will rack like crazy.
My stretchers on the ends are big ass dovetails and through mortise and tenon with wedges.
The big stretchers that on the long sides are made to prevent racking. And so far I have yet to move this bench the slightest even with heavy planing. I have clamp space on the top and this bench weighs over 300lbs... it's not going anywhere.
Top: Maple Legs and stretchers Beech with walnut wedges.
On 6/3/2012 4:22 AM, Bill wrote:

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tiredofspam wrote:

Very nice looking work. I will similarly place my stetchers, but (unfortunately) with screws this time. Thank you for the lesson!
Bill

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tiredofspam wrote:

I posted 3 pics of the virtually-finished result, in case anyone would like to see them. It's basically Swingman's design stretched to 58"L x27"W x 40"H. The height feels like it was made for me! : )
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Thank you, again, to everyone who helped!
Bill
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Looks good. You might want to chamfer the edges of the 4x4 bottoms. So if you drag the bench you won't splinter the outer edge. Just a little, not a lot.. it doesn't take much to protect it. A block plane can do the job, just back it up with another piece of wood, or plane to the center.. (a little more difficult)
On 6/20/2012 5:48 AM, Bill wrote:

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tiredofspam wrote:

> You might want to chamfer the edges of the 4x4 bottoms.
Thank you. I think that's a good suggestion. I appreciate your comment on a technique to use too. Just thinking about it was a good lesson.
Bill
So

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On 6/20/2012 4:48 AM, Bill wrote:

http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
That should last you a while, good work! This is an effective, simple, sturdy, versatile, and very inexpensive to make bench design which can be knocked together in short order.
Only thing I would have done differently, and it can still be done in ten minutes, it to add two screws to each of the short side stretchers, into the end grain of the long side stretchers.
Every little bit of added stability adds to the total, and just 16 more screws won't break the piggy bank.
YMMV ...
Thirty years from now you will still be using that puppy!
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Swingman wrote:

Thank you, I will add the 16 screws. I guess screws into end grain may do a lot better than nails into end grain (which, as you know better than I do, have little holding power).
Maybe I'll add 1 more screw for a pencil holder!

Nope, it's not going to fall apart! I hope I have an opportunity to prove you correct, or even incorrect! :-)
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How about a 3/4" plywood shelf on top of the stretchers. That would add a lot of rigidity in side impacts and some heavy stuff stored there would help stability.

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On 6/20/2012 7:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Yep, you're right ... and that's the first thing I added to a similar one about ten years ago:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/Bench.jpg
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Noticed the vise on that bench. Have you ever seen any sag on the end of the bench from the weight of it?
The reason I'm asking is that I've got a Record 53 vise that I am going to mount on a 1.3/4" laminated maple bench. I figure it's over 50 lbs. It's considerably wider than the one you've got and I'll have to move the legs inward at that end at least a foot.
Don't laugh at me, but I'm worried about the end of the bench sagging form the weight. Am I being paranoid?
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Never had a problem, and that bench top is just a solid core door with a Masonite type skin on it, but my vise is not that heavy. I would think that with sufficient apron mass, and a 4x leg close by to transfer the weight down to the floor, that 50 lbs would not be of great concern. For a couple of years I had a Delta Mortiser more or less permanently attached to the other end and never had a problem with it ... is your vise that heavy?
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According to amazon.co.uk, it's 18.6 kilos, so that's just over 40lbs, but mine doesn't have an integrated bench dog and their's does, so it's not exactly the same. It's all I can do to lift this beast off the ground and place it on the bench. I'm reasonably sure it's more than twice as heavy as my Senco PC1010 20lb compressor. Think it's the biggest vise that Record built.
It really is massive which was one of the reasons why I could see it almost fifty yards away as I was driving by. Bought it at a deceased owner's yard sale. Only decent tool that was there. No questions asked, I paid the asked for $75 on the spot for it. This was before the wheelchair, some thirtyfive years ago. Don't quite remember, but I think I ran full speed back to the car with it and left pretty fast.
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I'm still working off the old (1974?) Home Depot $25 Special made from 1-1/4" termite barf, 4x4 SPF, and pristine 1x4 pineywood.
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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My bench gets so cluttered that I find myself working on the 3/4" plywood out feed table most of the time ... unsturdy folding legs and all.
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I've only seen and used the vise on my bench in the past ten years. <g> You know how it is: each and every horizontal surface is filled within a minute of being cleared.
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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