The $4K Wood Shop

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wrote:

I know about HTTP, so now there's also a JTTP.
R
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[..]

Sorry.. I don't do "fan of lame".
/sawn

[translation] I am so ridden with paranoia my brain fogs at the sight of a email address.

What was that you were saying about having a Life? Read what you posted, again.
FYI.. I "decided" long before <r.w> came to my attention. btw... That would never have happened only the subject chose to cross-post (as is his way) so as to _make sure_ I knew where he was currently getting his jollies. You getting any picture here, or are both your antennae covered in tin foil?
Thanks. You answered the question I was to ask in email. What is the actual count for "klutz" in <r.w>, you (as an example) are perfect meat for Gymmy/Josepi.. bloody clueless. And you are a "Mike"! I can see he will have a lot of fun with you. You worked out how many personas he is running here, yet? Anyone had their identity stolen in mime? What about claims you are all p3d0s? He pulled that one yet?
/baaaahh Yew are a waste of effort..
Just filter this nym.. the name, NOT the address. Think you can manage that much?
    y'all enjoy the bonfire now, y'hear. I will just sit and watch.. if that is fine with you.
--

cHips

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How many times did you keep asking the girl to dance after she shot you down? Historically speaking, of course - I'm sure you left all of that behind you.
R
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mkay... that, together with your response to Steve, tells me we best 'talk'.
... anytime ;-)
--

cHips

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Got a problem with that one drawer, doncha ... :)
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


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On 11/10/2010 2:24 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

ROTFL .... just hate it when a drawer follows you out the door!
That was funny ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
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On 11/10/10 6:44 AM, Swingman wrote:

I love when stuff like that happens. My personality is such that I'd rather be funny than profound. :-)
I got a bunch of those drawers at a best buy that closed down. I offered something stupid like 10 bucks per box and took 6 or 8, I can't remember. They've been through a bunch reincarnations and are ugly, but have served me well.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 11/10/10 2:24 AM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

Yeah... :-) Did.... I pounded a couple indents into the backs of the rails so the wheels drop down and hold.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Any

1. I would look at the Grizzly dust collection and see if you can get some more suck for the same or similar buck.
2. I don't see an air compressor or any guns listed. I'd say a Harbor Freight $150 air compressor. A few reels of hose from HF also and some fittings. Setup 2 or 3 outlets at different points in the shop. and a few quality staple and brad nailers. I have a bostich 18 gague nailer, no oil 2" to 5/8" and it has never jambed once. Use it weekly.
3. I like the Dewalt 735 MUCH better than the Makita or any of the planers of that design style. It is just a really great workhorse
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On Tue, 09 Nov 2010 05:03:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

A couple of suggestions. The Rikon mini is about the same price, but has a 12" swing and 16" between centers and, IMNSHO, an easier belt change.
<http://www.rikontools.com/productpage_70-100.htm
The next step up, and what I now use in my small shop, is the General 25-200 Maxi-lathe VS. It has variable speed, a swivel head, a 12" swing inboard and a 19" swing outboard. 17" between centers.
<http://www.general.ca/site_general/g_produits/lathe/25-200.html
Whatever you get, be aware that the cost of tools and accessories often exceeds the cost of the lathe, especially on the lower priced lathes. Here's what the local turners club suggests for tools.
<http://www.inwwoodturners.com/controls/articles/INW%20Woodturners % 20Beginners%20Tool%20List.pdf>
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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round out my budding shop. I have a budget of about $4K, and the entries below add up to about $3K. The rest will go on odds and ends, lumber, and anything that I may have missed.
My shop is half of a two-car garage. I already have a table saw and miter saw (both poor quality), a decent router, and some small hand tools, including a decent 4-set of Irwin chisels and a few Avant planes. ---------------------------------- Right now you have a heady feeling.
Keep the money in the bank for a while and just ponder your navel.
After that, proceed with caution.
A one car garage is going to limit you, without a good utilization game plan.
The most useful tool will be your table saw.
The most important part of the table saw is the fence.
First thing I would do is replace your existing T/S.
Budget around $1,500 by the time you include a good set of blades and an 8" Freud dado set.
Budget around $500 for a decent bench top planer.
Budget around $600 for a good table mount router (I like Milwaukee 5625) along with the materials to build a good router station and a few high quality bits.
Budget at least $400 for clamps.
At this point sit tight, buy some 1/2" & 3/4" birch ply and build a few jigs.
After about 6 months, you will have figured out a way to acquire the rights to the other half of the garage and what additional tools you need.
Floor mounted drill press, jointer and certainly hand tools such as sanders, drills, jig saw, replace existing miter saw, etc.
Other items will be determined by what you learn along the way.
Above all, take time to enjoy the process.
Have fun.
Lew
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Be sure to "take inventory" and double check that your electrical and/or lighting configuration is adequate for your plans. For instance, is 220v power available/desirable for your next table saw? Personally, I've been working on these things as I collect tools. I can repost or try to provide links to some detailed suggestions I received if you are interested.
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

... I'd suggest the first thing is as a couple of others have done--slow down on the spending spree!!!
First, unless you're getting into this for a profit or other reason, what's the hurry other than gratification of spending a wad of money in the pocket?
If there really isn't a pressing time need, I'd also second the suggestion (particularly if you're in a reasonably sizable population center) to just watch for sale items in estate sales, yard sales, craig's list, etc., etc, etc., ... , as well as go check out the pawn shops and similar. Value is to be had there that may exceed quality of what you're looking at now for less expenditure. Cost is some effort and time...
Also, I'd suggest the first place I'd start as well would be to either replace or at least upgrade the TS--it's the workhouse of almost all cabinet work unless you're going to be primarily hand work (and, if that's the case, I'd suggest the investment would be better served in higher-quality hand tools instead of machines).
I'll also concur w/ one and disagree w/ one -- if cabinet work is your plan and you have any intention of using other than already surfaced solid lumber (and I can't imagine anything else, personally), then definitely imo the largest jointer you can fit into the space is well worth it. Again, that's my usage; at least one other poster always disagrees and disparages same tool... :)
Again, I'd also emphasize that the shop area you're speaking of isn't very big you'll find when/if all the stuff you've listed were to show up--do some serious planning on work station, work flow, etc., etc., etc., or you'll have a roomful of tools and nowhere to work. Don't overlook the need for assembly and intermediate work space as well in that layout. Every board that goes thru the planer has to start on one side and end up on the other. If it's a pile of rough lumber being prepared, that's a need for a stack on each side and room for the cart to bring the stack back from the outfeed end to the infeed for the next pass. Which of course, illustrates that there ought to be room for two carts to hold the stack so don't have to unload the one and pile it somewhere so can return it to the outfeed side...
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Before you spend any money, figure out what you can fit in the space. You'll be much happier with less that works together rather than more that's constantly in the way. Sketchup is an invaluable tool for this, especially with the use of the 3D library.
Here's a tip: figure out how much feed/outfeed room your tools need and mark it off. No tool can intrude into that space, but other feed/outfeed areas can (and should) share the space. I put my planer and jointer at a right angle to the table saw so they could share the same outfeed space.
Like others have suggested, I'd upgrade the table saw first. Next, I'd get a good crosscut style of saw, either a CMS or RAS. That takes care of 90% of the cutting in my shop. If your existing table saw still cuts square enough and is in a little portable box, you may want to keep it and use it for those times when you need to make another cut and have the good saw set up for another option.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 11/9/2010 8:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You mention you have a poor quality table saw. The table saw is the workhorse of the workshop. Before you splurge on additions like a lathe, etc. I'd upgrade your tablesaw to at least a good contractor's saw. Delta, Powermatic, Dewalt, etc. all make saws in this category.
You should be able to get a good table saw for < $1000 and still have money left over for all the other things you listed. As long as you struggle with a poor quality tablesaw, your woodworking will suffer.
~Mark.
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