The $4K Wood Shop

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Having recently had a minor windfall, I decided to splurge and finally round out my budding shop. I have a budget of about $4K, and the entries below add up to about $3K. The rest will go on odds and ends, lumber, and anything that I may have missed.
My shop is half of a two-car garage. I already have a table saw and miter saw (both poor quality), a decent router, and some small hand tools, including a decent 4-set of Irwin chisels and a few Avant planes.
Projects will range from small items (pens, jewelry boxes), ranging up to furniture, and guitars if I get brave. I want to develop a range of skills involving hand tools and power tools. This is very much a personal enrichment hobby.
The tools I've chosen are intended for the long haul, so I'm definitely trying to get these picks right the first time. Any suggestions or comments on my selections below?
Bandsaw Grizzly G0555 14” 1HP 425 Shipping 74
Planer Makita 2012NB 473
Jointer Grizzly G0586 8” 575 Shipping 139
Lathe JET JML 1014VSI 10-Inch-by-14-Inch 350
Drill Press DELTA DP300L 190
Dust Collection DELTA 50-760 1.5HP 1,200 CFM 371
Tenoning Jig Grizzly H7583 77 Dado Stack Oshlun SDS-0842 84 Belt Sander UNDECIDED ???
Marking Gauge Rockler 21 Clamps Bessey KRK2450 160 Coping Saw Robert Larson 540-2000 Coping Saw 17 Water Stones UNDECIDED Square Empire Level E250 12-Inch Combo Square 12 Lubricating Paste Minwax Paste Finishing Wax 12 Mineral Spirits 6
Total Current Cost: $3000
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Do you need a jointer? A lot of guys do without. And many who have them, don't use them that much. Much of a jointers job can be done on a table saw or with a router.
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On Nov 9, 7:31 am, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

After doing without for several years I bought a Grizzly 8 inch. It is the least-used tool in the shop. All I use it for is prep. All it does is give me a set of boards flat on one side with a dependable right angle on one edge.
I consider it perhaps not the very best tool investment I ever made, but certainly in the top ten. Just because it turns the prep work into an afternoon instead of a day or two, and just because it's so nice when everything's milled right.
I got along without it for a long time, and it sits idle for long periods but every time I use it I feel like I got my money's worth. I've spent more money to get less satisfaction on quite a few other purchases.
That said, I waited till I had the money and I knew of several places where I could get rough cut air dried lumber. Being able to mill any old board I brought into the shop was worth quite a bit to me. Your mileage might vary, but I wouldn't get rid of mine unless I was replacing it with a bigger and better one. :-)
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<...snipped...>

Hey, you wanted a jointer, you bought a jointer. You don't have to justify it to us. :)
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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table
Table saw?
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If your table saw is poor quality, look there first. IMHO
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On 11/9/2010 6:41 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Ditto that. I had a Crapsman TS and upgraded to a Delta. I thought the Crapsman was adequate until I got the Delta. The difference was simply astonishing.
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On 11/9/2010 1:00 PM, Just Wondering wrote:

For the original poster. You said you have an older table saw, but you gave no details.
Don't confuse the comments on the recent Craftsman table saws with the 10" Craftsman saws of the 50's and 60's. If you do it is like comparing a Walmart special to a Delta.
If you have a 50's or 60's table saw it will serve your purpose and probably have less plastic than the current expensive saws.
I have a 1968 10" Craftsman table saw that I inherited. My father inlaw was going to a lot of woodworking and bought the best they had. I aligned it once, and have not had to make any adjustments since.
Do have to keep a good coat of wax on the cast iron top, but it looks like new.
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Having recently had a minor windfall, I decided to splurge and finally round out my budding shop. I have a budget of about $4K, and the entries below add up to about $3K. The rest will go on odds and ends, lumber, and anything that I may have missed.
My shop is half of a two-car garage. I already have a table saw and miter saw (both poor quality), a decent router, and some small hand tools, including a decent 4-set of Irwin chisels and a few Avant planes.
Projects will range from small items (pens, jewelry boxes), ranging up to furniture, and guitars if I get brave. I want to develop a range of skills involving hand tools and power tools. This is very much a personal enrichment hobby.
The tools I've chosen are intended for the long haul, so I'm definitely trying to get these picks right the first time. Any suggestions or comments on my selections below?
Bandsaw Grizzly G0555 14” 1HP 425 Shipping 74
Planer Makita 2012NB 473
Jointer Grizzly G0586 8” 575 Shipping 139
Lathe JET JML 1014VSI 10-Inch-by-14-Inch 350
Drill Press DELTA DP300L 190
Dust Collection DELTA 50-760 1.5HP 1,200 CFM 371
Tenoning Jig Grizzly H7583 77 Dado Stack Oshlun SDS-0842 84 Belt Sander UNDECIDED ???
Marking Gauge Rockler 21 Clamps Bessey KRK2450 160 Coping Saw Robert Larson 540-2000 Coping Saw 17 Water Stones UNDECIDED Square Empire Level E250 12-Inch Combo Square 12 Lubricating Paste Minwax Paste Finishing Wax 12 Mineral Spirits 6
Total Current Cost: $3000
Might I suggest you keep the money tucked away in a nest egg and buy the equipment as you need it. You may find that you excel or want to go in a particular direction with your wood working and might want to put a larger amount of money towards a higher quality/versatile piece of equipment. As it appears now, you are trying to get as many pieces as you can for the amount of money you have to spend. You might be better served by getting a much better quality than "poor quality" table saw. The table saw is probably going to be used more than all other tools combined especially if you have a good one. With most quality tools you may find that you use them more often if they are up to the task.
I have been a serious woodworker for about 32 years and I make money at it. I consider some of the items listed above not necessary as I have not had the need for them in all of my years of woodworking. Those items include the jointer and tennon jig., YMMV
Good Luck!
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On 11/9/2010 8:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I believe you are missing a rafter square which is a solid metal triangle with a wide edge such as the Empire 7 In. Magnum Fat Boy Aluminum Rafter Square at Home Depot. I find this tool to be invaluable in setting things up when working on the table saw, drill press, checking the square of you small assemblies, etc.
While most people will say it should not happen these squares are sturdy enough to survive being wiped from the bench onto the floor and not have its accuracy effected.
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Hope it is more square than a Speedsquare. Never got ahold of one of them that was square.
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On 11/9/2010 12:04 PM, CW wrote:

setting up the table say to cut the miters on picture frames, where you have 8 cuts in the 4 corners.
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The tools I've chosen are intended for the long haul, so I'm definitely trying to get these picks right the first time. Any suggestions or comments on my selections below?
CLIP
You mentioned the "DELTA DP300L Drill Press."
I would suggest either the floor model DELTA 17-950L or DP400 (discontinued?) or a Grizzly G7944 or G7948 machine. If you have three phase power in the shop, consider the G0521 drill press as it is a pretty amazing machine for the money with a quill stabilization notch and even self-reversing features for tapping holes (not likely needed in wood, but one never knows!)
You can still get the "L" lazer add-on for the other DELTA machines but I'm not sure about the Grizzly.
Here are links to the Grizzly machines:
http://grizzly.com/products/12-Speed-Heavy-Duty-14-Floor-Drill-Press/G7944
http://grizzly.com/products/12-Speed-Heavy-Duty-14-Floor-Drill-Press/G7948
http://grizzly.com/products/12-Speed-Heavy-Duty-14-Floor-Drill-Press/G0521
Often times, people find they wish they had a larger drill press... Why not plan for one now at a few extra $$$?
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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So lets save you some money and spend it better.
Get a larger bandsaw... more horse... wish I had gone higher than 1hp. Planer get the dewalt... Drill press go to Tractor supply and get the full floor standing model. I paid 129 its now 169.. very good for the price. Not comercial quality but I consider it a good unit for the price. maybe replace the belts with linked belt.
Tenoning jig.. Woodcraft goes on sale for 59 on occasion. Dust collection ovoid the Delta. over priced. Delta doesn't rule anymore. Cheap crap.. so get something else, and save some money. But make sure it is good to 1micron at least.
If you look around for used stuff you will find some excellent bargains..
Good luck... look for some cabinets that are being thrown away I modify them cut the kick panel out , put a full skirt on top (to raise it up) and put wheels on the bottom 2 fixed and 2 full locking. They make excellent tool tables and move around, and hold all the items you need for the tools. I make wedges for the fixed wheels since a concrete floor is rarely level for all 4 wheels, to lock the one floater to the ground. Always try to wedge the fixed wheel.
On 11/9/2010 8:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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I second the **FLOOR STAND*** drill press. The table top one will always take up resented room on a work table sowmwhere and collect chips. The prices are not much higher and deeper throats are easy to afford.
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message wrote:

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On 11/9/2010 9:56 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Might as well budget for cutting tools while you are at it.

Budget for (carbide) forstner bits?
I agree with the suggestion you received to mostly let your projects guide some of your major purchases.
Bill

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wrote:
Here's my $0.02.

Pretty small if you get the bug. I have the non-VS version of the mini-lathe, but find I use the full size more (Jet 1236). Not heavily into turning though.

Spend an extra $15 and get the Freud dado set. I bought one used a few years back, and liked it so much I bought one for my son for Christmas the following year. Terrific dado set for the money. $99 at the orange Borg, probably cheaper on Amazon.

I realize money is no object in your case, but take a good look at Scarey Sharp. A buck's worth of glass at the thrift store and you can buy an awful lot of sandpaper for the cost of those waterstones. No flattening, soaking, etc. required. Buy a jig though. The $12 one everybody owns will do fine after you tune it.

Get a Starrett and keep it in the plastic bag and cardboard box when not in use. This is your reference square. Get a second Starrett for daily use. I got a used one for $25 off the Bay, and it lives on the bench.

Johnson's Paste Wax. Been around for almost 100 years. Works great. The Johnson company sponsored Fibber Magee and Molly for 20 years on the radio, and kept mint record copies of the shows in their vault for 50 years. They released these to the public domain back in the 80's so people could enjoy the shows. Some 700 episodes still exist, most in extremely good sound quality. They deserve to be supported for that act of generosity alone.

Rob suggested a Good table saw. I agree,. Put a Forrestt Woodworker-II on it. If you keep your old saw, still upgrade to the WW-II blade.
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On Tue, 9 Nov 2010 05:03:09 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Just remember that you'll grow into and out of machines as you work, and your workstyle can change drastically from what it is now, or is perceived to be in the near future.

Or larger, for resawing or cutting larger workpieces?

Looks like a nice li'l planer.

G0586 is no longer made. Why not a nice spiral jobber? http://www.grizzly.com/products/8-Jointer-with-Spiral-Cutterhead/G0656X

If you ever turn table legs, you'll want something in a longer bed.

A Griz floor model is much more handy and doesn't take up bench space, while taking up very little floor space. http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-Speed-Heavy-Duty-14-Floor-Drill-Press/G7944

Why not lower-maintenance, 2hp, 1,700cfm Griz? http://www.grizzly.com/products/2HP-Canister-Dust-Collector/G0548Z (I installed three new 240v 30a outlets in the shop for my new tools when I moved here. Total cost was a day of my time and less than $100 in materials.)

1" and 6" belts come in handy, as can oscillating sanders.

Don't forget a striking knife. Cheapie: http://www.chipsfly.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?page=W/PROD/34-330 or exotic: http://knight-toolworks.com/?page_idG8&category=3&product_id=3 (I have an original Knight, before he teamed up with Chester.)

Add about 50 variously sized HF Pittsburgh bar clamps (about the same price on sale) and you'll have a shop's worth.

2x6" 600 and 1200 grit diamond plates, preferably DMT. and a handful of various finer grits of wetordry sandpaper for ScarySharp(tm)ening things.

Precision squares are a better value.

Briwax and Renaissance are much better.

Gallons of denatured alcohol, lacquer thinner, and acetone are always handy in the shop, too. $10 a pop, can last years and years.

Congrats on your windfall and prospective new tool purchases!
-- Education is when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get if you don't. -- Pete Seeger
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wrote:

I missed the one-car size the first time. These are very good points. Make sure that anything and everything you get is on good casters, preferably locking. I have been using these for several years, and have 5 tools/carts rolling on them. They are excellent, and even on sale until late in the month. I've found that 4 swivel casters work better for me than two fixed and two swivel in most cases.
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2001989/3723/3-Caster-Double-Locking-Swiveling-with-4-Hole-Mounting-Plate-414-Tall.aspx?ss öfa0e8d-b3a7-41e2-a771-191b86426ba7
Tinyurl: http://tinyurl.com/26vgc7b

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Did you know that shopping carts in European supermarkets (and Borg equivalents) have four swivel casters? I couldn't count how many times have I've ohad to lift the fookin' back of the cart to move it out of the way of someone going by. The four swivels allow you to just push it in any direction. We certainly lag behind in some areas.
R
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