That wacky Nahm

Okay so I was watching NYW and our buddy Nahm was making a small table with a round top. I stepped out of the room for a minute, and when I come back Nahm had the table top, maybe somewhere in the 20" diameter neighborhood, on the lathe at a very slow speed and was using a router to make it round and then do some grooves on the face of it near the edge. With a router. On a lathe.
I love the fact that Norm shows multiple ways of doing the same thing from one episode to another, but what was he smoking before this episode?
He then put an edge profile on it at the router table, and rather than using a starter pin he attached this whole circular fence to the regular fence.
-Leuf
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So what's the problem?

Watch a bit closer and you will see that there was no place for the bearing to ride. What would you have done?
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I missed the setup to this so maybe you can fill in what he said his reasoning was. For now I am sticking with crack pipe.

That's not how I saw it, but I was only half watching. I thought he said the bit had a bearing but there was nowhere to start the cut. If that's the case then make a template, stick it on with double stick tape, and use a starter pin.
-Leuf
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wrote in message

The part had a rather thin, flat bottom. Lot easier to get good results with the router. While your there, might as well do the outside too.

In addition to being able to see it, he stated this before he ever did it.

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Leuf,
I think it is you that is using the crack pipe. Several years ago "Norm" did a show on bowl turning. He visited a professional wood turner up in Friday Harbor Washington (yes there is such a place) who turns very large, great big, I mean humongous bowls. He uses a modified WW II aircraft parts lathe to turn the bowls. For turning tools he uses Porter Cable router bodies. He turns some chunks of juniper that require a fork lift to move. So yep turning using a router is done.
--
George H Hughes
Warner Robins, GA
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George H Hughes wrote:
> He visited a professional wood turner up in > Friday Harbor Washington (yes there is such a place) who turns very large, > great big, I mean humongous bowls.
J R Benford, the yacht designer, as well as a lot of sailors also call it home.
Lew
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Take a look at Tom Plamann's lathe. http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/lathe/view.nhtml?profile=lathe&UID 012

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I bet he could make some really nice pens with that! <g>
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Yes, I can see the advertising now. "Fine writing instruments for the Jolly Green Giant".

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On Sat, 10 Feb 2007 23:49:28 -0500, "George H Hughes"

I see so because some dude has a very specialized need it makes sense to build a whole special lathe contraption instead of some simple circle cutting and template work.
-Leuf
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wrote:

I'm a bit puzzled by the hostility. Nobody says that _you_ have to do anything that way. If you have another method that works for you then by all means use it.
There is no "right" way to do woodworking. As long as the piece turns out the way you wanted it to and nobody got hurt you did it the "right" way. Don't confuse conventional practice with some kind of ideal.
If Nahm's thinking outside the box and coming up with a novel setup to do a job that you might do by some more conventional approach, well, more power to him. Might be that somewhere down the line you'll run into a situation where his approach will make your life easier and having seen it you'll know how to go about it.
There's also the matter of what you have in the shop. He's got a mighty shitload of stuff in his shop that most of the rest of us don't--some of it store bought and some of it leftover tooling and jigging from earlier projects. If recycling a piece of that makes his life easier then I don't see any point in putting him down for it. If he's already got all the pieces to do it his way then it's not "building a whole special lathe contraption", it's "using the whole special lathe contraption that was built ten years ago and put on the shelf after it was used for whatever it was needed for".
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Oh, Good Grief!
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wrote:

You confuse sarcasm with hostility. Part of my reaction is from, as I have said, walking in the room and there's a table top spinning around on a lathe with a router involved without seeing any setup. I was a little shocked.

I started out in the original post saying I love the fact that he shows different ways of doing things. They should make sense for the intended audience though. So I criticize him for using things like the Timesaver and the industrial pocket hole machine. And now apparently for wacky router/lathe hijinx. I don't generally criticize him for personal choices like finishing and whatnot. I do blame him for singlehandedly perpetuating the idea of always running grooves down the middle of a board by flipping it around to center it and then doing the same thing with the tenons. If you do that and your boards aren't EXACTLY the same thickness you end up with a bunch of grooves of varying width and a bunch of tenons of varying thickness and you are completely and utterly screwed. Reference surfaces, Norm. REFERENCE SURFACES!
Phew, I feel better now. But seriously, it took me a long time to unlearn that.

If you get to the point where you're needing to use a router on the lathe I think you're way past anything Norm has to teach you. Not trying to put him down, he's better than me at most things. But how many novices are now out there thinking they need a giant lathe and a router to make a circle? How to do that top with just the router and without putting a hole on the top side would have been a good lesson.
I've thought about it and I'm still not sure what the best way to do the groove near the edge would be. Temporarily attach a piece of scrap in which to drill a center pivot and use a circle cutting jig, or cut out a circle template and try to follow it? You probably need to mark the center on both sides of the top. To do that accurately you probably need to glue up the top as a square, rather than using shorter boards at the edges, so that you can use the diagonals. Or is there another way of marking the centers? My point of all that being that there's a whole host of little things that would go into it that which I could have taken away from watching, versus something I'm never going to use.
-Leuf
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Well, the point of the show is "education" -- granted, a novel concept.
I didn't see the show, but sounds interesting and if one were privy to the whole process of the preplanning for the project for the show including Norm's thinking about what to do and how to do it, I suspect the idea of using/demonstrating novel techniques would be a significant portion of the decisions.
That it might be considered "overkill" for a particular project doesn't lessen the value in seeing techniques that, with some thought, could be totally new ideas for many viewers and lead them to solutions for their own problems that would otherwise not occur to them...
If "Nahm" were to take such criticsm for showing something other than the same old "pin it until the glue dries" to heart, there might as well never be a new show taped...
imo, ymmv, $0.02, etc., etc., etc., ...
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Leuf wrote: > Okay so I was watching NYW and our buddy Nahm was making a small table > with a round top. I stepped out of the room for a minute, and when I > come back Nahm had the table top, maybe somewhere in the 20" diameter > neighborhood, on the lathe at a very slow speed and was using a router > to make it round and then do some grooves on the face of it near the > edge. With a router. On a lathe. > > I love the fact that Norm shows multiple ways of doing the same thing > from one episode to another, but what was he smoking before this > episode? > > He then put an edge profile on it at the router table, and rather than > using a starter pin he attached this whole circular fence to the > regular fence.
I have watched this project twice, courtesy of some travel around the country recently.
If you study it for awhile, think you will find that it is rather complex project.
Using the lathe spindle as a rotary shaft, was probably about as straight forward as it gets, IMHO.
As far as the jigs and usage of the router table, his explanation was very straight forward, again IMHO.
Lew
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