Thanks for your tips

Hi All,
Over time I have picked up many of the tips that you fine people have posted to this list. And your tips have led me to take on the following woodwork project. A farm tractor, out of Red Oak. About 11 inches long.
See
Http://www.barr-family.com/wood/tractor-r-side.jpg
Http://www.barr-family.com/wood/tractor-left-side.jpg
Http://www.barr-family.com/wood/tractor-front.jpg
Http://www.barr-family.com/wood/tractor-back.jpg
It took the use of most of the power tools, as well as hand tools. Lathe, band saw, drill press, Scroll Saw, Radial Arm saw, Jointer, resawing, Dremel, Router, Power sanders, and Air Brush with Shellac. And a whole lot of advice which you ladies and gentelmen have given.
Thank you for all the help that you have given me, without that help, this project would not have been accomplished.
Zap
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zap wrote:

Wow, that is very nice. How long did it take you to do that.
Love the old John Deeres. Dad has an old A.
You did well.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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other woodworking projects. The clock is definitly a winner! I hope to be able to make one of those some day (gotta get more tools first - scrollsaw).
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How did I make the tires?
Each rear tire was made in two halves. I did not have the routers that was suggested that I use, so I turned both halves of each wheel on the lathe. Having both half of a wheel glued together with paper between for later separation. That kept both half at the same size. the inside ridges simulating the rim were turned at that time but leaving the center in place for removal at a later time. I enlarged the center hole to 1/4 inch to fit on a jig which I made for cutting the groves in the tires for tread. The jig was made to hold the wheel half at 45 deg to the 1/8 inch dado blade on my Radial arm saw. The half was rotated on a 1/4 inch shaft. At each 18 degree of rotation of the wheel half, a cut was made 1/4 in deep, the wheel rotated another 18 degrees and the next cut made. After both half of the wheel was notched, one side angled one way and the other side angles the other way. a 1/8 in piece was inserted and glued into each slot. Then they were sanded flush at the center of the wheel and at the outside edge of the wheel. Then a dremel grinder with a sanding wheel was used to finish shaping each of the lugs. finally both halves had the center cut out on a scroll saw, and a groove routed on each tire half inside edge to take the center of the wheel. Then the wheel was assembled, the two tire half and center fitted and glued together to form the finished wheel.
That was a challenge. I was wishing that I had a table saw to cut those tire groves, as that overhead spinning Radial arm saw blade scared the heck out of me. I was not happy with my hands that close to the blade.
Hope that helps.
Zap
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