Test the new USENET VOTING SYSTEM

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TIME TO VOTE-
It is time to vote against the creation of a new newsgroup to replace misc.writing.screenplays because that group is the home of the net k00k Jai Maharaj (Jay Stevens). The new group would be called misc.writing.screenplays.moderated if it passes and it would be moderated by censorship advocate Alan Brooks. To vote, send a blank email to snipped-for-privacy@netagw.com and a ballot will be sent to you. Results will be posted to news.groups in 3 weeks.
GET THEM SOCK PUPPETS OUT OF THE DRESSER FOR THIS ONE! VOTE NO, AND VOTE OFTEN!
SAY NO TO CENSORSHIP!
ORIGINAL CFV:
FIRST CALL FOR VOTES (of 2) moderated group misc.writing.screenplays.moderated
Newsgroups line: misc.writing.screenplays.moderated    Craft/business of screenwriting. (Moderated)
Votes must be received by 23:59:59 UTC, 23 Dec 2004.
This vote is being conducted by a neutral third party. Questions about the proposed group should be directed to the proponent.
RATIONALE: misc.writing.screenplays.moderated
Over the past few years the existing group misc.writing.screenplays has become a magnet for off-topic cross-posters. In a typical day, as much as 80% of the traffic on this group is driven by a single, malicious, self-promoting poster. The proposed moderation level is simply to eliminate most cross-posts, thereby eliminating the most egregious of serial trolls. Moderation of this group will be automated and very minimal, but even this level of moderation is expected to reduce overall traffic to the group by a very large percentage and to bring the on-topic signal well above the noise again.
This change is requested only to save a beloved and well-used discussion area by creating a moderated sister newsgroup as a forum where professional screenwriters and serious, aspiring, amateur writers can discuss their craft in the public arena.
CHARTER: misc.writing.screenplays.moderated
The misc.writing.screenplays.moderated newsgroup is open to discussion of the art and business aspects of writing screenplays for feature films, documentaries and television. Specific topics may include but are not limited to:
Finding an Agent Querying Production Companies Latest formatting trends Creative screenplay writing Screenwriting software Screenwriting books Screenwriters, their skills and styles Tools available to the screenwriter Collaboration issues Tips from the pros
Moderation policies:
The purpose of the proposed moderation is not to escape from the meandering and conversational tone of misc.writing.screenplays, but to eliminate the excessive abuse of the newsgroup by cross-posters from unrelated groups. The intention is to implement robo-moderation, eliminating all cross-posts except the few that are appropriate. Cross-posts to groups such as news.groups, news.announce.newgroups and news.announce.newusers will be allowed unless these groups become the vehicle for serial-cross-posting by trolls.
The moderators reserve the right to filter posts from individuals who already have a history of off-topic cross-posting, and who simply alter their techniques to single-posting off-topic articles, or who attempt to flood the group, or who alter their posting headers to simulate approved status.
END CHARTER.
MODERATOR INFO: misc.writing.screenplays.moderated
Administrative contact address: snipped-for-privacy@panix.com Article submission address: snipped-for-privacy@panix.com
END MODERATOR INFO.
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Vote counting is automated. Failure to follow these directions may mean that your vote does not get counted. If you do not receive an acknowledgment of your vote within three days, contact the votetaker about the problem. It's your responsibility to make sure your vote is registered correctly. Duplicate votes are resolved in favor of the most recent valid vote. Names, addresses, and votes of all voters will be published in the final voting RESULT posting.
DO NOT redistribute this CFV in any manner whatsoever. The purpose of a Usenet vote is to determine the genuine interest of persons who would read a proposed newsgroup. Soliciting votes from disinterested parties defeats this purpose. Only the votetaker, the news.announce.newgroups moderator, and the proponent (if specifically authorized by the votetaker) are permitted to distribute copies of this CFV.
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DISTRIBUTION:
The only official sources for copies of this CFV are the locations listed below, the UVV web site at http://www.uvv.org /, and the votetaker's e-mail
This CFV has been posted to the following newsgroups:
news.announce.newgroups news.groups misc.writing.screenplays
Pointers directing readers to this CFV will be posted in the following mailing lists:
Mailing list name: SCRNWRIT Submission address: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
Mailing list name: STORYNOTES Submission address: snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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snipped-for-privacy@TheCabal.zzn.com (Russ) wrote in message

<snip the crap>
The fact that you people think you're so high and mighty to tell others what groups should be created crack me up. Without knowing any better, I went through the "procedure" to create a group a while back, and after all the BS that went on, I just found a guy whose usenet server allowed him to create groups created it for me.
You guys are the old sysops from the 80's and early 90's whose power has been taken away by the internet.
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Ehhh, just for the record, _some_ sysops from the early 80's don't care so much about power these days (or then, I don't think).
Dave "Been there, done that, got the 1200 Baud Hayes Smartmodem" Hinz
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"Dave Hinz" wrote in message

That was high tech, dude ... my Fido BBS was first run on a 300 baud "hayes compatible". I clearly remember when I hit the big time with a US Robotics 9600, along with 4 MB of memory in the box.
Jack Rickard, who ran "Board Watch" magazine, is who should have run for Prez in 04!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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Well, the first one was a Hayes 300 that I bought out of the back of Byte magazine for $239.00, in probably 1981. I wrote the BBS software (in Basic, of course), and it ran on a 64KB TRS-80 Color Computer with (4) 156K floppy drives (5-1/4" of course).

Always wanted one of those. White plastic case, wasn't it? But, anything faster than 2400 baud is wasted anyway, because that's as fast as you can read text.
Dave Hinz
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Dave,
Did you live in London in the 80's?
David.
wrote:

"hayes
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wrote:

No, but I did spend 3 months in St. Albans (Herts) in 1992 or 1993....??? Dave
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Nope. The white-plastic case was the 'sportster' -- came along later. The USR Smartmodem 9600 was in the same aluminum case, with the black band front and rear, as the Smartmodem/Smartmodem 1200/Smartmodem 2400 line.
But the really desirable one was the 'Courier' line. black case, slanted edges on the front 3 sides. and *expensive* On the other hand, they got you circa 14kbps, when most of the rest of the world was having trouble getting above 2400. First was the 'Courier HST', then, _as_ the standards developed, they added 9600, and then 14,400 support. Then there was an ISDN model, and finally the "V.everything".
The true top-of-the-line, however, were the Telebit "TrailBlazer" products. _started_ with 19.2K throughput, and worked over nearly _any_ kind of a phone line. trans-oceanic, satellite bounce, whatever. durn near _nothing_ would cause those units trouble. Of course, they were *expensive* -- circa $700 each, and frequently had more processing power internally in the modem than the computer they were connected to. (The Trailblazers had an internal Motorola 68030 processor, playing like a DSP.)

You can read in excess of _two_thousand_ words a minute?
I can _barely_ keep up with a sustained 1200 words/minute.
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snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

It was great to leave the speaker turned on when the 'Blazer connected. The noises they produced while analyzing the transmissions qualities of the circuit were really impressive. We used to call it "The Rhino Mating Call".
They also spoofed UUCP, Kermit, Xmodem, and maybe a few other things so they could better optimize the packet size over the phone circuit.
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Yeah, but can you whistle the handshaking tones for not just 110 and 300, but for the 1200 baud connections?
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The 110 baud and 300 baud 'carrier' is the same tone. 'Bell 103' standard. at 1200 baud, it depends on which 'standard' was being used: 'Bell 202', 'Bell 212', or 'Vadic 3400', just for starters.
I could whistle a Bell 103, or a Bell 212 carrier,
Heck, I knew a guy who could _modulate_ his Bell 103 'whistling'. Well enough that he could transmit messages that way.
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Yeah, that was it.

Heh. On my desk right now (OK, I cheated and went and got it) is a Hayes "V-series ULTRA Smartmodem 9600" (V.32). That lovely aluminum extrusion and all. I wonder if USR came out of Hayes? I don't remember that history.

We've got 3 of those in the lab here too (just checked). We need to have a cleanup day, I think.

That's the 3 we have, V.everything.

Sweet. I started out on the 6809, so I've always liked the 60xx(x) families.

I think your math is off. Hang on. OK, 2400 baud, assume 10 bits per character (stop bit, parity, plus 8 bits of ascii, right)? So that's 240 characters per second. That's 3 lines. Yeah, that's a bit much. Maybe it's 1200 baud that I could keep up with.

That's prolly it.
Dave
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Arghh!! my mistake. There was _no_ *USR* Smartmodem line. that was Hayes's _registered_ trademarked name.
Hayes and USR had no common history. USR was originally named in honor of the company that employed Dr. Susan Calvin, in the analysis of positronic brains.
The Hayes extruded aluminum 'box', *was* copied by a whole _bunch_ of people. and I _THINK_ (but at this point I'm no longer sure) that USR offered an 'in between' model in that style case. The 'sportsters' were the budget home-use line, and the "Courier" was the high-end commercial line.
USR was _very_ late in introducing a 9600 baud model in the Courier line. the early spec for the 9600 baud 'standard' had technical problems, and units built 'to the standard' did _not_necessarily_ work with other brands that were _also_ built to the standard. USR had the higher-performing and also "incompatible-with-anything-else" HST protocol -- they didn't see a need to jump on the 9600 bandwagon -early-.
They _may_ have even built on the V.32bis (14.400) standard -- which came out about the same time the 'corrected' V.32 (9600) standard was released.

If it comes time to get rid of 'em. I'd be interested in 2 of them, for my 'museum'.

Before the advent of the 28.8k (and subsequent 33.6k) modems, Telebit practically *owned* the long-distance, high-speed, modem market.
USR's Courier HST, was somewhat more finicky about line quality than the 1200/2400 baud "bell 212"-esque 'smartmodem' and equivalents. Good for across town, not so good for inter-state. and particularly not for international distances.
It was a "given", however, with the Trailblazers, that if _they_ wouldn't connect, you couldn't get through with _anything_, not even an 'old reliable' Bell 103 at 110 baud or below.
A *lot* of skull-sweat went into the DSP software in those boxes. And the way they chopped the audio spectrum up into a _lot_ of independent narrow bandwidth sections, and put a separate carrier in each section. Skipping over the sections that were 'too noisy' to use reliably.

240 char/sec, at 6 ASCII characters/word (5 'printable' plus the inter-word 'space') is 40 words/sec. --> 2400 words/min.
Note: bits/sec, and words/min have an "interesting" relationship.
*POSTULATING* 10 bits/char, it takes 60 bits (6 chars * 10 bits/char) to represent a 'standard word' for speed calculation purposes.
thus, bits/sec * 60 sec/min --------------------- ==> words/min      60 bits/word
The 'units' conversions cancel out, as do the two '60' scaling factors.
_X_ bits/sec === _X_ words/min
If the 'character' is something other than 10 bits, you have to adjust accordingly.
thus: 110 baud -> 100 words/min (11 bit characters) 300 baud -> 300 words/min 1200 bps -> 1200 words/min 2400 bps -> 2400 words/min
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Noted. What continent are you on?

Yes, that was the modem of choice for people on crappy connections.

I didn't know they were doing that, but it makes perfect sense. Is that how they're doing it these days as well? I'm not up on that side of things; I prefer 802.11b these days.

Cool, I never noticed that.
Dave Hinz
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line.
No - that was Hayes Smartmodem.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
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Yup, did that, both the 32K "piggyback", the 64K "cut & jump", and later, the 512KB mod on the COCO3.

Yup,
Not familiar with that one.

I liked that you could poke into a certain address and double the clock speed all the way to nearly 1.8 MHz, up from 0.9MHz. And it almost always didn't crash the system, if your RAM was fast enough.

I lost interest completely in computers somewhere from DOS4 to DOS5 days, didn't get back into it until the 486s were in vogue. Had to do with burnout, starting college, and a very bad boss for a programming gig (if you're someone reading this and wondering if I mean you, then yes, most likely, if you had someone named Toni working for you).

Yup. For my utility boxes, Linux is the answer. My desktop at home is an Apple iMac, which wraps Unix in a pretty GUI, and everything "just works".

Yup.
Exactly. I've found myself prototyping stuff for work, on my system at home. One is running FreeBSD/Mac OSX, the other is running Solaris, but they're both Unix and even config files transfer; just recompile the binaries. Fun stuff, this "anything other than Windows". We do miss out on the viruses, though...and the spyware...
Dave Hinz
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Youse guys and your high tech. My first modem was 110-baud acoustic coupler (you know, stick the handset in the rubber cups) connected through current-loop interface to a Western Electric ASR-33 (complete with paper tape punch/reader).
Getting that decwriter with the 300-baud AC modem was a dream.
scott
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Yup, had one of those first too. Dumped it almost immediately, because it didn't fit my phone.

OK, you win.

Damn skippy it was.
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"Dave Hinz" wrote in message

Yep ... it was damn hard getting the separate mouth piece and ear piece to stay in that acoustic coupler while you cranked the phone.
--
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Prometheus wrote:

You had ground?
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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