Tenoning Jig

Anybody ever make their own Tenoning Jig for a table saw? Got Plans? I noticed there is some pretty frugal people in here so I thought I'd ask. Dave
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yes
Yes, can you read .dwg files? It uses your fence as a guide tather than your miter slot and you must modify deminsions for your particular fence. You will need to also add a clamp to hold the wood.

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Leon, I often send drawings to others that don't have cad software. PDF is the way to go. Actually, It is rare that I will send a dwg almost always a pdf. I use PDF 995. Works well and it's cheap.

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Thanks CW, Is PDF995 cheap as in free? I agree that PDF is truly the way to go if you have a way to convert.

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Leon, send it even if you can't convert it. I'll find a way to convert it on Adobe Acrobat Reader, which is free btw. Thanks a whole bunch! Dave
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Actually, thanks To CW I am able to convert to .pdf format also now. I'll send you a .pdf file.

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Yes, I made my own tenoning jig. Sorry, I don't have pictures but I will describe the process:
I have an older table saw with a very accurate miter gauge and hold-down and I used the miter gauge as the foundation of the jig. I had a straight scrap of hard maple about 7" wide and 18" long. I cut off one piece and turned it at right angles to the other and glued and screwed them together. I added a stiffener to the top of the vertical piece (fence) to keep it from twisting or warping and affixed a stop strip along the back of the fence to keep the workpiece oriented viertically. I also added a stop block to the horizontal piece so the fence (and thus the screws) could never come into contact with the blade. For added assurance I always cut the cheek farthest from the fence and flip the workpiece over to make the other cheek cut.
I don't have micro adjustment capability -- I have to loosen the miter gauge hold down and reset the jig -- but that has not presented much of a problem except some increased setup time. I have one of those accu-cut disks on my saw's table and it makes it very easy to gauge the cut line on the workpiece. I usually cut my tenons a little too thick on the first pass and "sneak up" on the final dimension. That assures me of a nice snug fit.
A caveat: I happened to get my fence perfectly vertical on the first try but the cut line was off a fraction. I had to re-do it to make the cheeks perfectly parallel to the workpiece sides.
Work slowly and carefully with a framing square (preferred) or speed square of proven accuracy. Test your results by making a stub tenon on a scrap and fitting it into a groove plowed into another scrap. I did this with nominal 1X4 material. Just using the saw blade, I set the fence, plowed a 1/8" wide groove 1/2" deep, flipped the test piece end-for-end and finished the groove. That gave me a 1/4" groove perfectly centered in the stock. I then laid out and cut the tenon making the shoulder cuts first then the cheek cuts. This procedure will show you quickly and very graphically if your jig is accurate.
Good luck...work safely.

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http://www.woodworkingathome.com/Mag/0001-WaHM.htm
I did that one... Simple, straight-forward.
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