tenon, back, dovetail, mitre hand saw

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On Tue, 7 Apr 2015 17:16:29 +0000 (UTC)

was concerned about the sharpening after looking at the blade closeup like to be able to sharpen them myself still leaves options though
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wrote:

There are "feather" files for that purpose. Easily available, here are some... http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?cat=1,43072,43089&p2951
Personally, I would never bother sharpening one. First of all, there are 200+ teeth; secondly, the steel is very hard and it will be a long time before they need sharpening. I still use (occasionly) one I bought 40 years ago. I have others too but it is my favorite...missing some teeth near the heel so I just don't use that part.
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dadiOH
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On Tue, 7 Apr 2015 15:02:29 -0400

I think I have one will have to look

couple seconds per tooth so let's say it takes 20-30 minutes to sharpen that's not so bad it's hard to find a person that will do good sharpening
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Since you mention this, and you also mentioned setting teeth, be aware that any saw you buy at Harbor Freight, Home Depot, etc, likely has hardened teeth that you cannot sharpen; nor can you set them (they'll break off), altho you can reduce the set as has been suggested.
(I agree with you on the price of "antique" tools, but that's because most sellers are not knowledgeable, and just copy the price they see on someone else's website for something that looks similar. That problem exists for pretty much anything antique, not just tools).
John
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On Tue, 7 Apr 2015 21:31:42 +0000 (UTC)

How do I tell if they are hardened or is the correct word here tempered

I'd likely break them off trying to alter the set

I did look at prices for completed auctions and the prices are too high for me.
There are a lot of unsavvy sellers that do those things and worse maybe unsavvy is generous
Another interesting thing I've seen on ebay is that prices for veritas things sell very close to new prices and I think I saw one sell for more
Auction frenzy syndrome
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Hardened is the correct word - in fact, I think the process used is called "induction hardening". As far as I know, all mass-production saws are made that way today (i.e. Stanley, Disston, Lenox, etc - anything you'd get at Home Depot or Lowes). The way you tell is to try filing one - a hardened tooth is as hard as a file, so the file won't cut it (or, you could on the makers website, which probably says).
John
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On Wed, 8 Apr 2015 18:01:53 +0000 (UTC)

ok so grinding will work but not filing I have a dremel somewhere
funny thing is I have some cheap turning gouges that are made with softer steel and i find myself using them more than my other HSS gouges
why because i can put a file on them or even emory cloth and keep them sharp so i can keep turning with minor interruption
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I've had better luck at flea markets and garage sales. Most recently, a pristine stanley sweetheart (manuf by Disston) 24" back saw for $10.
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in

Likewise - my favorite crosscut saw is a Disston with a cosmetically challenged handle, that came from a flea market. Even with my inexperienced sharpening, it cuts very well. According to the Disston medallion site, it's around a WW1 vintage.
I also have a 24" backsaw like yours, which unfortunately lost it's miterbox a long time ago. One of these days I'll feel up to trying to sharpen it. It's an impressive looking thing compared to a modern backsaw.
John
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I have a stanley #100 (from before stanley bought the company that made them) which works quite well with the 24" backsaw.
http://5.forums.drupal.assets.tauntonnet.com/sites/forums.finewoodworking.com/files/attach_images/152051/img_5244.jpg
Perfect for picture framing.
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On Wed, 08 Apr 2015 13:20:05 +0000, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Disstons are great saws, but they seem to be rust magnets. Not to mention they are a gleam in every collectors eye. If you find one labelled "Disston & Son" (no, not "Sons") grab it - they're rare!
Oh, about that propensity to rust. My favorite old saw is an Atkins "Silver Steel" saw. Must be some forerunner of stainless steel, because it's rare to find one with more that one or two little spots of rust. Come to think of it, it's rare to find one, period!
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On Wed, 8 Apr 2015 21:28:30 +0000 (UTC)

iron that's more pure rusts more easily, also softer approaching %99 it's not usable for tools probably lower than that

Does it have silver?
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On Thursday, April 9, 2015 at 12:43:37 PM UTC-7, Electric Comet wrote:

Silver steel is an old (or British) name for tool steel, i.e. hardenable high-carbon steel, O1 or A2 are typical.
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On Tue, 14 Apr 2015 01:38:14 -0700 (PDT)

i guess that explains the lack of rust
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Why would you think that? It's high-carbon steel, not stainless.
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On 4/15/2015 8:11 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

And FWIW certain grades of Stainless will rust too, especially those that a magnet will stick to.
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On Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:11:56 GMT snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

was a question
what's your answer
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On 4/15/2015 10:16 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Really? Looks more like a deduction.
> i guess that explains the lack of rust
Why would you think that? It's high-carbon steel, not stainless.
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On Wed, 15 Apr 2015 10:51:01 -0500

what's your explanation would like to hear it
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On 4/15/2015 11:13 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

I have no explanation. I was just pointing out what seemed to be a deductive statement, made by you, was what I thought you later said was a question. Using punctuation might have make your comments a bit more clear.
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