Temporarily dried up

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On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 23:29:28 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Lot to be said for that. Several good friends are turners. Their mistakes are art. My mistakes are junk.
Frank

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<snippage>

My mistakes are creative firewood. ;-)
Patriarch
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Awww, now Frank.... come on....
You never had a shelf turn out to be a cutting board in the end? You never had a small chest wind up with a couple of less drawers, or maybe the end result a little smaller because of a setting you misfired when setting up your saw or jigs?
Do you have any idea how many small flower vases are turned into Christmas ornaments on a lathe every day? Or how many bed post finials are turned into mallets, or baseball bat blanks that are turned into chopsticks? More than anyone would admit.
I don't believe an engineer would give up on a project that didn't meet the original specs - I thought you guys called those things field design modifications! ;^)
Robert
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*snip*

A misteak becomes a design decision when you document it. :-)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 22:22:17 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Sure, but those are brand new projects. I intended for them to end up that way :~).
Frank

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LOL! Absolutely.
"That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!":
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Some of the best chopsticks / hairsticks on the planet are made from ash, I'll have you know!
Bill
--
I'm not not at the above address.
http://nmwoodworks.com
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: That's the fun of it as there really

What about "Keep the nose of the skew out of the wood."?
;-)
Bill
(Who just turned 10 spoons this week 'cause he didn't feel like turning a slab of box elder into the shallow bowl he originally had in mind when he cut the log.)
--
I'm not not at the above address.
http://nmwoodworks.com
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Nyet! Nein (sp?). Non. (french?), "horizontal squigley line with two dots above the right end of the squigly line". Uh-uh - Bubba. (Bushistic) Fraid not old chum (English). Oh HELL no! (rap). Farkin' roo shit! (Oz) Blarny (Irish).
(Qualifier: Keep the nose of the skew out of the uphill side of a cut. Downhill works just fine, especially acrossed end grain)
Though the illustrations on this page are for a single bevel chisel or an actual bedan, the cuts are the same, starting the cut with either the down side corner of the chisel or the long point of a skew chisel.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/Turning/Turning15.html
If you think about it, it makes sense/ Starting a cut with the long point - "the cut" being either a rocking slicing cut acrossed the grain to cut a line. which is actually a narrow V groove, or rolling a bead, initiating the cut with the point means basically a single point of contact with the wood, as opposed to a small section of the skews "sweet spot". The less contact with the wood the less apt it is for one of those nasty Spiral Cuts.
It seems that everything you think you SHOULDN'T DO with a skew is actuall what you should do. And, conversely, what you think you SHOULD DO with a skew - you shouldn't. Maybe because it doesn't look like a gouge it developed a contrarian attitude. Could be the reason I like the tool so much.
charlie b
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Snip-eroo

Hey.... I mastered those spiral cuts just about the first time I used the skew. I can do them just about anytime without warning now. They are the most reliable cut I make with the skew!
I can use the skew to plane, use it (end of the long point dropping in at about 1:00) to cut beads, grooves and coves, but that's about it. I use my Christmas ornament turning time to practice some with the skew.
But we aren't friends, and I wish we were. I like the "cut smooth" finish the skew leaves. Ahhh.... but control.... I just can't get it. So I wind up going back to my custom ground spindle gouges and even my stumpy little three point tool to do the things I should be doing with the skew. It simply takes too much time for me to do things with it.
And then of all the stupid things to do I watched one of Raffan's videos on using the skew, and that sombitch uses the same skew to rough out the bark off a log as he does to shave the end fibers on a chuck held piece of hardwood. He can make shavings like I do with a bowl gouge, or tiny little corkscrews like the ones that come off my spiral cut coffee grinder.
On a good day I can detail with the skew, but I haven't ever had anywhere near the confidence it takes to face off the end grain of a 6" diameter piece of hardwood.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

"Those who live by the skew, die by the skew ..."
Or something like that.
My first few cuts with a skew were anything but controlled ... but now it is my favorite tool for most cuts.
When I was turning a spoon the other day I got a spiral cut on a decorative finial end. No problem ... I hand-carved it deeper and colored it in. ;-)
Bill
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wrote:

Not a problem here. The biggest surprise about retirement is that I don't seem to have the time to do all the projects I want to do. So many of them are going at once and the challenge becomes finishing something.
Now let's see
1. finish the shop expansion 2. finish the china cab and side board 3. finish the bedroom furniture for bedroom two 4. finish the kitchen remodel. 5. repair the facia and soffit, paint the house. 6. finish the double bass repair (oh, finished that last week) 7. finish the lighted mailbox and driveway post (Oh, finished that last week too, feels good to actually be finishing some things). 8.start the bateau fast skiff 14 or indian river skiff. 9. Start the hall tree 10. start the ......I'm sure by the time I get here there will be something by this number.
However, you can take up some other hobbies.
Frank
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I'd have been exhausted just making up that list! I should have mentioned that I retired due to a heart attack and energy is a premium commodity these days. Ergo, I save it for something that I feel is something that will give me creative satisfaction . . . or something like that.
FoggyTown Most of my projects' best features began as mistakes.
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FoggyTown wrote:
| Wow. Retired life is a bitch when your only real hobby is | woodbutchering and you can't think of a new project that feels | interesting or is even uninteresting but necessary in the home. | Bummer. I suppose I could go and get some new thingjimmy (like a | scroll saw or mini lathe) and play around with it until the Wood | Muse blows in my ear again - but I don't have the room to add any | more shinies. I've already tidied up my shop. NEXT!!!!
OK. Not sure I have a cure, but you're welcome to follow the links on the page below to look at some of the little side projects I've worked on to see if any of them strikes a resonating note...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/interest.html
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Your drawer/box clamp looks interesting. I'd like to work on the design somewhat so that it provides pressure from four directions instead of (unless I missed something) two. But if you have already thought of that and dismissed it for some reason, I'll go with just the two.
FiggyTiwn Most of my projects' best features began as mistakes.
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FoggyTown wrote:
| Your drawer/box clamp looks interesting. I'd like to work on the | design somewhat so that it provides pressure from four directions | instead of (unless I missed something) two. But if you have already | thought of that and dismissed it for some reason, I'll go with just | the two.
NO! Four directions would definitely be an improvement for some glue-ups. Go with your instinct. The reason I put the pictures there was to provide a _starting_ point - *not* an _end_ point.
Please send/post photos!
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Like I tell my kids, boredom is a luxury! Load up your shop and bring it here help rebuild SE MN. We'd be happy to have you!
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