Template Sanding with OSS

I'd like to be able to make parts identical to a template, like you would using a router and flush cut trimming bit, only I want to do it on an Oscillating Spindle Sander. I figure I'll have to bandsaw roughly to shape anyhow, and with a solid OSS I can both finish the piece to size and have it sanded smooth in one step.
On the drill press I've seen a disk that goes below the sanding drum that guides the template. However, on an OSS the spindle goes up and down into the table. Where and how can I mount a 1/4" diameter disk with which to guide my template? Maybe I just haven't thought it through yet...
JP *********** Slow today.
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    Greetings and Salutations....
wrote:

or so smaller in dimension than the finished piece size. Then, mount the work piece on the template, and, place the pin RIGHT next to the drum.     Alternatively, simply use the template to mark an outline on the work piece, and, free-hand it. Should be easy enough to do with an OSS. If you need a couple of pieces to be "identical", then stack them up and sand them to final size at the same time.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Jay Pique wrote:

that does what you're looking for. Check it out. The bearing was a little too undersized for my taste and I replaced it with one that I made via trial-and-error with a circle cutter.
Having said that, doing template work with a sander is the *LAST* thing that you probably want to do. It's like scrubbing your kitched floor with a toothbrush. I make solid body guitar bodies from templates all of the time and wouldn't consider doing it with my OSS or drill press alone. Here's what I recommend (and use myself):
1) Go to Woodcraft and ask for a Whiteside solid carbide spiral flush trim bit with bearing. Don't go with the standard straight flush trim bits, even though they're cheaper, especially if your template pieces are thicker than 1/2". Routing thick template pieces by hand on a router table with regular straight bits is *dangerous*, especially when you hit places where the grain changes direction radically. The solid carbide spirals w/bearing are pricey but they're a bargain compared to the cost of new fingers.
Spiral cutters also eliminate chatter and give you a very smooth finish.
2) Mount the template to the piece and and bandsaw as close to the template line as possible.
3) Route using the template and spiral bit on the router table.
4) Clean up anything needing cleanup on the OSS.
Tim Henrion
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