Temperature Related Finishing Problem???

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Thanks for the input Mike. I don't have a humidity problem where I am now... Just a dry heat. I think another poster may have found the problem, and that is since I store the finishes indoors (cool) and I apply them to a work piece in the garage (hot) I'm getting condensation and muddying everything up. I've got a test piece cooling down indoors, and I'll do a quick application of Danish oil before going to sleep tonight.
Brian.

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I think I would find a better varnish unless you may be exagerating about having to wait for below 65% humidity. I live in Houston TX where the humidity is rarely below 80% and I don't have those problems. Granted dry time tends to be a bit longer but it certainly does not prohibit applying a varnish of any kind.

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Water does not have much effect on the finish when used on scraps and does not have much effect if you are using a water based varnish.
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Christ is in our midst.

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The more moisture the has wood absorbed the more likely the Seal you use will fail.. It may not fail ASAP on a piece of scrap wood, but it will fail.
Failure is caused when the water that is placed on the wood eventually finds an exit. This will cause the surface of the wood where the water was applied to shrink whick causes tiny fractures in the Finished Surface and will lead to a costly re-finishing job..
I am sure you've seen these fractures on a finished surface.. The same will happen if you use wood with high moisture content. But eventually the finish will chip or floof off the surface of the wood turning your finish into dust. This is why I suggest that if you wish to see how the wood will appear before you add the Finish Sealer, use Mineral Spirits.

I've tried the water base Polyurethane once and was not impressed and went back to the Oil Base Finishs.. They last much longer.
God Bless, Michael
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IMO your water comments need to be qualified a bit. Nearly all wood has some water in it, and the amount slowly changes during the year. Finishes slow down but do not stop the exchange. Look at design aspects that take into account wood movement. Also include the common technique of spraying with water to raise the grain before finishing. What you're describing take an awful lot more water to cause those issues. As you mention, the wood moisture content is your best guide. GerryG

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Christ is in our Midst!
God Bless Gerry,
The next time you spray water to make the grain raise, do not spray the ends of the wood.. Only spray the surface and look at the ends how deep the water has penetrated the wood.. I've seen ARC absorb a light spray of water on the surface of a piece as much as a 1/4" and that was only what I could see.. I've seen Black Walnut and Red Oak absorb a light spray of water as much as 1/8" to a 1/4" into the wood.. The more porous the wood the deeper you can see a fine mist go into the wood. And if you can see where the moisture has gone 1/4" into the wood, you can add another 1/16" to an 1/8" to the most porous places on the surface you just sprayed that you can not see.. Now after you wipe the water from the surface of the piece and apply your varnish, that water is trapped under the surface of the wood and when it finds a place in your finish to evaporate, and it will, the wood will shrink under the finish causing what I call "Microcracks" to form in the finish which will allow the wood to breath better and absorb the moisture it lost.. The process of evaporating, microcracking will continue until the microcracks will weaken the bond between the varnish and the fibers of the wood allowing the varnish to chip or fluff off until you have a re-finishing job and a PO'ed customer wanting you to refinish the piece.. I have seen this MicroCracking occur on pieces within 2 years. Which is why I always use Paint Thinner (Mineral Spirits) to raise the grain of a piece I am getting ready to finish.. The added oils in the mineral spirits tends to help the finish by resisting humidity and curves the need for raising the grain with water that is absorbed by the wood..
Please forgive me, sometimes I will comment on something assuming it is a well known concept and feel no need to go into great detail.. I will try and mend my ways on future comments.
God Bless, Michael
www.cedar-art.com
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Michael, I think we'll have to just disagree on the degree here. Jewitt and other finishers don't seem concerned, and I haven't seen an issue from this in several decades of working with wood.
Now, you spoke about "added oils" in mineral spirits? Do you mean if I let some dry on a piece of clean glass, I'll then see an oil residue? I don't think so... GerryG

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Mineral Spirits or as sold by EXXON as VARSOL is an oil base product and definitely will leave an oil residue as will most oil base paint thinners. Laquor thinner, MEK, and others will leave a powdery ash which is less desirable.
LLL
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Say what you will but I have several pieces of furniture that proves your thoughts wrong.

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Christ is in our Midst!
God Bless Leon,

As you wish.. It is not an important issue to me.. I know what I have experience with my own eyes..
God Bless, Michael
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Lest we forget, the first rule states: No single rule will always apply.
Many people have seen different problems and issues, and some have solutions, but may not realize that both the problems and solutions are often dependent on a bunch of detail that may not be obvious. That unless you can repeat them under many other conditions, you do not have a general rule. Add to this the "...in the eye of the beholder", and arguments often end up with more personalities than facts.
Michael, I don't doubt what you've seen, but suggest there are other factors involved and this is not an often seen issue. GerryG

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Christ is in our Midst!
Gerry, I couldn't agree more.. But from here on out when someone asks for help, I will be very leery about giving them my opinion.
God Bless, Mike
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Christ is in our Midst!
Look Leon, you said your were having a problem with your finish I assumed you were asking for advice.. I gave you advice based on my experience and instead of thanking me for my efforts or simply not heeding the advice and letting it go at that you have created an entire thread and seem to be more interested discounting the information I have given you which I have learned over the years via experience.. I thought I left the ingrates in REC, but apparently a couple went over the fence. So here are two last bits of advice I will give you.. This ain't REC.. If you want to argue, go there and argue all you want.. I left REC for this very reason and came here.. And the last bit of advice, don't hold your breath until you get anymore help from me! Just got no time for arguing over things I know to be true.. Got no need to convince you of anything. After all you're a big boy, figure it out yourself.

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