Teflon Coated TS Blade Slipping

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I bought one of those red Freud blades that's teflon coated and I'm now having trouble figuring out how to snug it tight on my TS.
The arbor has no place for a wrench to grab and I'd really rather not try to use a vise grip to hold it. I've tried both wedging a block in back and tightening it with a wrench, but no luck. I then tried snugging it up and then pulling forward on the blade while it's wedged the other way. No luck.
I guess my next options are to get out the vise grips and a piece of inner tube or possibly make some wahser type thingies out of abrasive paper (400?). Maybe I could remove the coating from the center of the blade?
Has anyone else had this problem?
Thanks. JP
PS - A Diet Dr. Pepper can is .004" thick. Thus, four thicknesses would be .016, NOT, as you might be led to believe, .0016. DAMHIKT. <grumble>
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Jay Pique wrote:

How do you tighten any other blade?

Every saw I've ever seen has a hex wrench to fit into the end of the shaft...
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I think that says more about your experience than what is fact. My Sears saw certainly has no way to hold th arbor, in fact the end of the arbor is cone shaped.
Since the nut tightens against the saw with the rotation of the arbor, normally you don't need to tighten the nut much when putting a blade on the arbor. Certainly one could rough up the area of contact between the arbor washers and the saw blade.
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"George E. Cawthon" wrote:

Quite probably...I've avoided a lot of little hassles by being selective in purchases, no doubt.
I think I'd modify any saw that didn't to have some way to do so...
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I have three of them and have never had a problem slipping. You just hold onto the blade with one hand and tighten the nut. Loosening the nut can be more difficult, but tightening...?
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Have you tried a piece of wood dowel under the back of a tooth of the blade, jamming against the underside of the top of the TS? Stick it in a gullet and raise the blade tight against it.
It won't stop the arbor from turning, but the blade won't. at least not against a "handshake firm" tightening.
Regards.
Tom
wrote:

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"Jay Pique" wrote:

<snip>
Do you have access to the vee-belt?
If so, either pinch it together or push against the motor to increase the belt tension around the sheave on the arbor which in turn increases belt/sheave tension while you tighten nut.
Lew
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I ended up just tightening the nut by holding the belt tight and then gave it a little more by holding the blade still with a gloved hand, although it still slipped pretty easily. I fired up the saw and it cut well.
I've never used a teflon blade before so I'm not used to how easily it slips. With uncoated blades I just finger tighten the nut, pull the wrench towards me until it leans against the table top and pull on the blade a little until it's nice and snug.
Thanks for the help everyone.
JP
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Help me to understand here. Are you saying that your normal blade installation technique works with other blades but fails with the teflon coated blade? I have a freud teflon blade and a forrest blade (no teflon). I install both using the same technique and notice no issues at all with the teflon blade.
From your description, I gather the slightest hint that installing the blade may be a new experience for you.
Bob
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How tight are you trying to make it? The blade will then to tighten when run, not loosen, so don't go too far. I've got a couple of those blades and don't have a problem at all in many change-overs.
What type of saw that the arbor cannot be held?
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I notice we are all talking to air. The OP disappeared after all the comments. Maybe he's done something dastardly with visegrips and an innner tube.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

This ain't a chat room pal. JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

Dave
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You're right, but its a communications medium. Its courtesy to occasionally acknowledge the efforts of others to answer your questions.
Bob
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Firstly, I never felt the need to get the teflon coated blades, I just get the steel industrial equivalents... Ideally, nothing should touch the plate and the kerf provided by the carbide teeth should give it plenty of room.
Freehand cutting of green, pressure treated decking material that has been sitting out in the rain with a skilsaw is another matter... can't read the writing on the side of the blade anymore after a few seconds.
Anyway, I find that if I can't hand-tighten it (due to the pain caused by new, sharp carbide points) then a pair of thick leather gloves does the trick. There's also some kind of "wrench" for blade you can get
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&pQ522&cat=1,41080,41165&ap=1
if you don't have any band-aids.

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The Teflon is more for helping prevent the pitch from sticking behind the carbide teeth.
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Jay Pique wrote:

You must have a really powerful motor if it doesn't stall instead of the arbor turning in the blade! You hit the solution with the sandpaper. Cut two disks 1/4-1/2" larger than the size of your arbor washers from from 600 wet/dry sandpaper and punch holes to make two paper washers, one for either side of the blade. If that doesn't hold it, throw the blade away.
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Are you serious? You should not need to add anything like sandpaper. If anything, the paper might be create a problem, since one side of it is paper and relatively slippery. I think your comment is frivolous and inappropriate, as you're advising a guy to do something on a potentially dangerous machine.
Bob
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BillyBob wrote:

cardboard or paper as shims in a dado, cause it is dangerous right? Might be too dangerous, start a fire, spin and not cut, make two wide a cut? :)
I think everybody pointed out that you shouldn't need to do anything, so hopefully he figured out what he was doing wrong. Hey, I'm sorry I gave advice to do something on a potentially dangerous machine. How about giving advice to NOT Do something on a potentially dangerous machine. Don't get in your car and put the key in the start mechanism! You are risking a terrible accident!
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I'm sure my response seemed harsh to you and it was a bit charged with emotion at the time. I apologize but the words are already out and I cannot pull them back. I was and am legitimately concerned with giving any advise to someone concerning the mounting of whirling teeth of a table saw blade, especially when they are considering vise grips as a possible approach. If the factory mounting won't hold it, then something is seriously wrong (warped blade, arbor or flange?) that won't be fixed by adding paper, stickem, or other user created additions.
Bob
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