technique for banding hardwood floor

I need to lay the floor in a new house. I would like to have something like black walnut as a band around some of the floor at about 6 inches from the wall.
When the banding material goes in the direction of the flooring - just lay in a walnut board. When the banding goes crosswise to the flooring I am at a loss. Cutting the flooring 6 inches short, placing in the walnut crosswise, and then putting in a bunch of short pieces from the walnut to the wall seems very tedious, and will probably show some alignment problems.
I thought about putting in the flooring as usual and then routing a dado for the walnut. Probably make the rout .5 inches deep. That would leave the original .75 inch oak boards intact. However, I could then put a .5 inch thick piece of walnut into the dado. How do I attach it. If I glue it, I will get the classic cross grain problem. If I nail it, they will show. I though about puting a groove at the bottom of the dadoed sides and then sliding the walnut (with rabbets on the edges) into place. However, that seems to require a trick sequencing problem for laying the boards out.
How do the pros do it?
Len
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Yup.
It adds some time, sure, but you get the benefit of having tongue and groove joining between all the boards to keep things all together. The field will then have two end-cuts on each row, for mine I chose to biscuit them together but that's probably overkill.

Sounds like more screwing around than just laying the border, filling the field, and then using the cutoffs/scrap from that to do the edges. In a 30' room, I was off by about 1/8" by the time I got to the "top" of the field, so I took 1/32" off of each of 4 boards to even things up. Not noticable, even though I know where it is.
Dave Hinz
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First of all I don't claim to be an expert. When I did a room like that, I started at the center and ran both ways as far as I needed, leaving the ends run wild past the border to be. Then I took a Circular Saw with a straight edge and cut the ends to length all at once. Then I used a Flooring router bit to router a groove in the ends, inserted a new tongue, put in the border and then the remaining boards. Hope this helps!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (ToolMiser) wrote in

That is one way, but I've found that to be more time consuming than this method.
The poster doesn't have a typical border described and I recommend he consider doing a standard 9 3/4"(4 board) or 12"(5 board) border. Lay 3(or 4) boards around the perimeter with corners either mitered or log- cabined(easier). Best to lay the border square and backfill where the walls are not square. Install tongue-out. Follow with the feature strip and then another strip of oak. This will put you either 9 3/4" or 12" from the wall(+ expansion space!!) Then start to lay your field, preferably routing a groove at your ends. If you cant route your ends, you will have to chisel the border tongue at the end cuts. It goes quickly after awhile, set up the chop saw and router right on the floor where your end cuts are. The less you have to walk, the faster it goes with the least effort. Hope that was clear enough, Ill be back in a couple of days if you have more Qs.
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