Teak resin

Anyone have an effective way to remove/ prevent teak resin from building up on a bandsaw blade? I have been using 'easy off' oven cleaner. It works, but messy and not ideal . TSP is not as good. I may try coating the band with a silicone spray for prevention, but concerned about possible slippage on the wheels.
All realistic suggestions appreciated.
regards......Ken
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Well... they suggest Acetone to cut the oil on woods before finishing so maybe it would work well. Use good gloves and a respirator.
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PS. Don't allow Silicon into your wood shop. You really don't want it getting anywhere near wood that will later be finished.
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calmly ranted:

Simple Green removes most gums and tars from blades. If you don't overheat the blade very often, plain old Johnson's wax helps prevent buildup.
----------------------------------------------------------------- When I die, I'm leaving my body to science fiction. --Steven Wright ---------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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In my New Year's quest to tune up and de-clutter the shop, I cleaned up three of my tablesaw blades this morning. It was really too miserable to work in the garage/shop. It's looked and felt colder than Portland the last two weeks. Simple Green and a 3M scrubbie thing did the trick.
I used Dricote afterwards, although I've used paste wax in the past.
The biggest variable seems to be the wood going across the saw. Some stuff gums up a new (read 'clean') blade, no matter what.
Patriarch, wondering when spring is coming...
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RE: Subject
Somebody wrote:

My suggestion is don't waste your time trying to clean blades used to cut good teak, not the imitation crap.
Good teak will dull a good carbide blade so fast it will make your head spin.
If you are going to work with teak, dedicate two (2) blades to the task.
One in the table saw, the other at the sharpening shop.
HTH
Lew
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"....Ken" wrote:

I would not use silicone spray. Try spraying "PAM", the cooking spray, on the blade and see if it prevents the build up. It works to reduce blade friction.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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I use carb cleaner..don't inhale too much of the spray or it'll clean you ! but the resin runs off.
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