Tapping machine threads in wood

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On 4/7/2015 11:52 AM, krw wrote:

Having installed probably close to 100 of these inserts, the correct size and depth hole to begin with pretty much assures that the insert will end up in the right direction. The holes are typically much larger than the rod that will thread into the center of the insert so the rod extending past the end of the insert, for guiding purposes, will be of little help. Just use the correct drive tool to begin with and the matter is handled.
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I'll respectfully disagree with this. The slotted kind of insert in particular have very little lead before the start of the screw, and it's quite easy to start them crooked. Depending on how off from straight you are, it's possible for them to cut threads and seat off line (which will then make the machine screw you're trying to screw into it bind).
The hex kind usually have a little more lead before the start of the thread, and tend to start straight without needing quite as much care, altho there's still a level of skill to it.
John
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On 4/7/2015 4:24 PM, John McCoy wrote:

If you use the right driver tool and drill, with the slotted insert, it is much easier. The trick is to not use a screw driver and instead use the drill mounted driver. The driver mounted to the drill gives you a lot of leverage for starting it straight. Here is what you want.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/page.aspx?pp791&cat=3,41306
EZLOK makes many different drill driver bits for specific sizes.
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On 4/8/2015 10:45 AM, Leon wrote:

FWIW, no pictures here but this vendor lists the proper/appropriate power drive for the particular insert you are using. There are 6 different drivers listed for the slotted brass inserts that they offer.
While the drivers are a bit pricey but worth it, the insert pricing is pretty reasonable, given quantity purchased.
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On 4/8/2015 10:52 AM, Leon wrote:
This might help.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/121/3304/=wnwp6f
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I originally mentioned a threaded rod (or bolt) to Greg as a better way of inserting them rather than using a screwdriver, not as a guide. If one needs mechanical help in inserting them straight, chuck the rod in a drill press. Cautionary note: turn the chuck by hand, not power :)
--

dadiOH
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On 4/7/2015 2:11 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Yes and that is fine but you certainly do not need the threaded rod to be a guide leading the insertion of the insert. ;~)
And with the proper driver bit a hand drill will work just fine. It is easy to hold the drill perpendicular to the hole while you let the drill do the driving work.
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On 4/5/2015 10:44 AM, woodchucker wrote:

Yeah, I think the slot is for driving. If you needed to remove the insert it would be next to impossible to remove with out the slot being on the outer side when inserted.
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On 4/6/2015 8:11 AM, Leon wrote:

Actually,,,,
http://www.mcmaster.com/#90016a007/=wmtvbm
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On Saturday, April 4, 2015 at 7:22:18 PM UTC-7, Greg Guarino wrote:

It's unusual to use machine threads in wood, because (1) wood moves, and (2) a little corrosion, sap, wood movement, and age will lock the screw in just like glue. Looser thread fits are used, I believe, when wood is threaded, than for metal. Conventionally, tee nuts, barrel nuts, and other metal threaded inserts are employed, with oversize clearance holes in the wood, and it's always assumed that takeapart later will be easy.
Field-expedient tee nut substitute: a hexagonal mortise and a hex nut.
Experiment away, though: that's the best way to find new things out.
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On 4/5/2015 1:15 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Not really. I have quite a few that work fine. I have used both steel and nylon screws, never had either rip out. Know which wood to use.
--
Jeff

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On 4/4/2015 9:22 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I use inserts and bolts all the time to attach upper cabinets to lower cabinets.
I in particular I use these which are relatively inexpensive, and can be easily driven with the power driver listed beside each insert size.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/121/3304/=wmtsri
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On 4/6/2015 9:15 AM, Leon wrote:

It looks like the hex shape carries all the way through the insert, leaving threads that are discontinuous inside. Is that correct? Does that cause the machine bolt to thread in less smoothly?
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On 4/6/2015 11:55 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

No, the hex is only about 3/16" deep. At leas with the flange style that I use. The machine bolts actually start threading more easily when aligning pieces together as the hex beginning section is slightly larger than the bolt.
The power driver goes in your drill and fits inside the hex section. The poser driver is pretty HD. Works much better than expected.
Click on the link to see the driver and the inside of the insert. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/
Simply predrill the appropriate size hole and then use the power driver to screw the in insert. Be sure do order the appropriate driver and while pricey it is easier drive inserts in with a drill rather than power it in with your wrist.
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wrote:

The ones I've ised are only broached for the hex about one thread diamer deep.
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