Tape measure in Tenths of an inch

Page 2 of 2  
wrote in news:1161539089.540990.280170

You can teach that in theory and suggest they try it on homework (Ooh, story problems!) You can even require they use that method on the homework and take off points if they don't. (Give them points for a correct answer if they use another method, but not all the points.)
John measures a board's thickness and it's 6/8". He wants to add a 1/8" thick border around the outside. How thick will the final piece be?
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper wrote:

3/4"
Adding a border around the edge of a board does not change it's thickness.
If three frogs are sitting on a log and one of them takes a notion to jump off, how many frogs are left on the log?
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One. The other one is right on the log.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

Correct.
One frog took a a notion to jump off, he didn't actually do it.
I'm taking a notion to get back to work now...
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
:)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The quesetion can't really be answered with the information provided. WE know that three frogs were sitting on the log to start, but the question asks, how many are left on the log? Since we aren't told how many frogs are on the log that are NOT sitting, the question cannot be answered.
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote in

Actually, I took it to mean: 3 frogs ------- (a)log
and it's still missing a crucial piece of information!
Also, these are obviously not Shrodinger's frogs, as you've already observed them and determined their value.
:-)
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in news:1161539089.540990.280170

But you can't "fail" them if they don't do the work.
In truth, though, I had more than a few who picked up their basic concept of fractions a few years late in IA class. Little Physics and Chemistry, too. Didn't have to listen to those whining "what are we ever gonna use this for?"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Puckdropper wrote:

Yes, that was my point. For comparison, it is much easier to work with a common denominator. Driving it home to _always_ reduce fractions whether useful or not is the part I question.
This is also an advantage to using binary fractions instead of decimal. It is easier to chose a base unit appropriate to the work being done.
For fine cabinetry 1 mm is too course and its too fine for framing. 1/32" may be about right for cabinetry and 1/64" surely is. For masonry and framing 1/8" may be about right.
You can measure or round to the nearest 2 mm or 3 mm, but the tape or rule isn't likely to have extra long ticks every 3 mm. No doubt the guys who have been using SI for construction all their lives handle it fine, but I'm far from convinced that it is better than binary fractions.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My observation has been that for the usual quality of construction work, 1/8" and 1/10" would be interchangeable. :)
--
No dumb questions, just dumb answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm still trying to figure out what the big deal is with reading rules and tape measures. Wouldn't 5 minutes with a guy who can't do it fix the problem? If it doesn't, why not set him to stacking lumber or carrying shingles until he learns, or just can him? Way I see it, if a guy can't read a tape measure, he has no business putting up a building. That's Framing 101, IMO.
As far as your initial comment goes, that's fine enough. I've worked with crews that use the same method. But personally, I've always felt that things hould be as accurate as possible for the long-term duribility of the building. Never liked 1/16" gaps all over- seems like years of shaking in heavy winds and storms would weaken things considerably, as well as allowing crap to collect in the joints and speed up the fasteners' corrosion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

104 tm (tiny marks)
Like those convenient metrics where dimensions up to a meter are reported in mm, I guess. There are a couple measurements in between, but seldom used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

...
Evidently he prefers decimal fractions to binary.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I got one from Lowes.

Mike Alexander PP-ASEL Temecula, CA See my online aerial photo album at http://flying.4alexanders.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.