tamarack flooring

hey fellas, i have decided to put in a new floor in my living room and bedrooms using tamarack, now my question is, could anybody tell me is between 6 & 8 % moisture decent enough drying for flooring. i have a lot of homework to do on this , as this will be my first fooring (wood) project to undertake. thanks and an input on flooring would be appreciated . fred
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd be surprised if the rest of your house was dryer than that. Stick your moisture meter into, say, some existing framing & see what the house's equilibrium is at, and then use the flooring when they're the same.
Dave Hinz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hey fellas, i posted this an hour ago but didnt make it ,not sure why.....Anyway i think i have decided to do my livingroom floor using tamarack, i have never put in a wood floor and am about to start my home work on it. the supplier of this tamarack says its kilned to 6 to 8%, is that plenty dry for flooring if so any help anyone can offer will be extremely appreciated. thanks fred
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Apparently not frequently used for flooring.
RB http://www.wood-handbook.com/wood-handbook-chapter-1-16-characteristics-and-availability-of-commercially-important-woods
fred wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RB notes:

nd-availability-of-commercially-important-woods
And an Amazon ad pops up for the whole book, hard copy, $59.95. Seems more sensible to me for those who want a hard copy to check out Lee Valley, where their version is $29.95 (and well worth it, I think: It has been repaginated so you can find things more easily--the original sectioning is a PITA IMO). And it does not seem to be much used for flooring, but with narrow growth rings and good strength, the only real worry is abrasion resistance. In a world where white pine has recently jumped in popularity for flooring use, at least a few people aren't too worried about long term wear. Having said that, I once lived in an old Hudson Valley farmhouse (built in 1839) with white pine floors. By the time I got there, they were 140 or so years old. Wear was visible, but they looked quite good anyway.
Charlie Self "In our civilization, and under our republican form of government, intelligence is so highly honored that it is rewarded by exemption from the cares of office." Ambrose Bierce
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

I have the Lee Valley offering; and also have the free version on a biz-card CD as a much more portable reference.
Somehow is seems wasteful to pay Amazon US$60 for a publication that's available for downloading from
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/TMU/publications.htm
(There's other good information there, too.)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Valley, where their version is $29.95 (and well worth it, I think: It has been repaginated so you can find things more easily--the original sectioning is a PITA IMO).
+ + + $ 22.95 in US money
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.