Tall bearings for bearing guided bits?

I should probably rig up some sort of pin router, but I'm curious.... I'd like to make some custom trays for a rolling tool cart I just built - the kind that have profiles of the tools themselves cut into them so the tool doesn't slide around and it has a nice cozy home. Rather than trace the tool onto the wood, and then cut out the hole, I'd like to make it much more difficult on myself. What I'd like to do is use the tool itself as a template for making a template to cut a tool sized hole into a piece of wood, which will then be flocked and hopefully the tool will fit like a (well cut) tenon sliding into it's mortise. Sooooo....I'm looking for a 1/4" flush trim bit with a really tall bearing. Or a pencil and some patience.
JP ********************************************* Please ignore this disaster of an idea.
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Jay, This reply is as far out as the idea but here goes: How about a tall router bit with the same size shank as the cutter. A little johnson's paste wax will lube the shank that will rub against the tool to be patterned. I know I'm at least a half bubble off center. Will post pics of a vase I cutout to accept a nameplate this way. 1/4" masonite was the pattern and it was not hurt at all. No damage to the shank either. Used a variable speed router (M12V Hitachi) with a fairly slow speed. Good luck Lyndell P.S. I forgot to tell you the hard part...........the tool will have to protrude thru the wood being cut so you don't hurt the bit or tool.

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Pics posted @ ABPW . Listed as pics for .......I somehow stopped typing . Also hit send twice. This is not my day. Just trying to help. Lyndell

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it may not be as crazy as all that.
you don't say what thickness the trays will be, so I'll assume 3/4", and assume that your router bit will make a 1/2" cut. so do this: lay the tool in the location where it will go, maybe even stick it down with a dollop of hot glue. cut some 1/2" plywood into strips perhaps4 or 5 inches wide. chop those up into lengths that correspond with the sides of the tool. lay them down next to the tool, just touching the tool, and pin them down with brads. for tools with curved parts, you might want to cut some curved pieces for better fits. now make a sub- base for your router that is at least twice as long as the longest direction across this whole assembly. set the bit to extend 1" from the sub-base, remove the tool and run the router around the inside of the space where the tool was, and hog out the field. a little sanding and you'll be ready for the flocking.
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On Mar 1, 8:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'm not sure if I thought of this or not, but I saw a show the other night where they embedded a mirror in a pile of GreatStuff and was thinking maybe I could somehow take a casting of each tool or something. I think I read something about doing something like this somewhere, maybe here.
JP
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wrote:

You're in the right place then.

I think you need something more like a soft foam or rubber rather than wood. If it's the tight fit you want how are you going to get your fingers in to get the tool out if there's no give? And I think you could cut it out with an exacto knife, or at least much faster with a saw than cutting wood.
-Leuf
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15-18K RPM router bits whirring up close and personal to my tools? Not in my workshop. I don't care how tall the bearing is.
Lay your tool down on a flat piece of hardboard. Trace outline of tool onto hardboard. Cut out center of tool tracing with coping or jig saw, then clean and shape any curves with a file. Use hardboard as a template for a bearing guided flush trim router bit. Hog and chisel out waste as necessary, flock, and be proud of your French Fit.
J.
Jay Pique wrote:

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I would deffinatly be more than a little jittery with a router bit running that close to my tool
1/4" Flush trim bit around tool will still give you a recess 1/4" larger than tool all round. Why not build or buy a pantagraph setup for your router. A bit of playing around to build a good one but should be usefull for other projects in the future. If you use a 1/8" straight cut bit and 1/8" guide in pantograph will leave you 1/8" (about 3/32" by the time you flock) clearance around tool which stop tool from moving around too much and still allow enough freedom to remove tool easily.
Another option which would also work would be a router carver which there was a thread about a few weeks ago.(can't remember the name of it) Scan image of tool and away you go, should even be able to profile the bottom of recess....... that is as long as you have $4000 (I think) to spare.
HTH

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Jay Pique wrote: | I should probably rig up some sort of pin router, but I'm | curious.... I'd like to make some custom trays for a rolling tool | cart I just built - the kind that have profiles of the tools | themselves cut into them so the tool doesn't slide around and it | has a nice cozy home. Rather than trace the tool onto the wood, and | then cut out the hole, I'd like to make it much more difficult on | myself. What I'd like to do is use the tool itself as a template | for making a template to cut a tool sized hole into a piece of | wood, which will then be flocked and hopefully the tool will fit | like a (well cut) tenon sliding into it's mortise. Sooooo....I'm | looking for a 1/4" flush trim bit with a really tall bearing. Or a | pencil and some patience.
The easy way with a CNC router:
I'd use a bit of double-stick tape to hold the tool in position on my router table and use a 3" length of 1/8" drill rod as a probe to determine coordinates on the tool profile (1/100" point separation is usually good enough).
Once the tool profile has been captured, the points can be imported to a CAD file and massaged (rotated, mirrored, etc) and saved as is or pasted along with other tools into the tray drawing. I think I'd add finger accesses so that I wouldn't need a strong magnet to lift out the tools - then use a 1/8" bit to cut and clean out the area inside the probed profiles and cut the finger accesses with a 1/2" round-nose bit.
Much easier than the pin router approach. No bearing required. Best of all, it keeps whirly sharp edges away from the tools.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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[snipped for brevity]

Would that be an approach for making the cut-out for an undermount sink? Take the sink, and trace it? Is there enough Z to get a sink under, or could one make a hole in the table and do it that way? Many sinks come with paper templates which can be scanned at a blue- print shop, then digitized from there? The sink-cutouts would be a primary justification for a ShopBot... NOT the 'toy-value'.
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Robatoy wrote:
| [snipped for brevity] | || I'd use a bit of double-stick tape to hold the tool in position on || my router table and use a 3" length of 1/8" drill rod as a probe to || determine coordinates on the tool profile (1/100" point separation || is usually good enough). || || Once the tool profile has been captured, the points can be || imported to a CAD file and massaged (rotated, mirrored, etc) and || saved as is or pasted along with other tools into the tray drawing. | | Would that be an approach for making the cut-out for an undermount | sink?
This method works well for irregularly-shaped objects. For more regularly-shaped (ellipsoid or rectangular) it's usually easiest to make a few measurements and type in the program.
| Take the sink, and trace it? Is there enough Z to get a sink under, | or could one make a hole in the table and do it that way?
You can have as much Z as you're willing to pay for. <g>
There's no real reason you couldn't make a hole in the table - but by the time you've built and surfaced a table, I'll bet that you won't be eager to chop it up...
There's really no need (I'm guessing) to get your spindle /over/ a sink. Just turn it upside-down and trace whatever contour you're interested in. If that contour is too high for your Z, then turn the sink right side up.
| Many sinks come with paper templates which can be scanned at a blue- | print shop, then digitized from there?
You can. I'd just take a photo and import the JPEG into my CAD package and trace over the image - then delete the JPEG and save my drawing as a DXF (which the ShopBot software can understand)
More and more manufacturers are making DXF files available for the asking. I've got CD's on my desk from DeStaCo (clamps) and Charlotte Pipe and Foundry - with both 2D and 3D drawings. Check with your favorite sink/faucet manufacturers - they may have already done the work.
| The sink-cutouts would be a primary justification for a ShopBot... | NOT the 'toy-value'.
Yeah, sure. <eg>
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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