Talk to me about templates, routers and double-stick tape

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I really am having a productive weekend, by my standards anyway. Yesterday I cut some project parts using a router template that I made, a first for me. Today, another new adventure.
As suggested by Swingman, I redesigned my kitchen shelf unit using stopped dadoes.:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12861854444/
My task for today was to figure out a way to make them. I don't have dado blades, chiefly because I don't have a saw to put them on. I make dadoes with a router and a jig I built a couple of projects back. I decided to try to modify the jig with some sort of "stop". Here's what I came up with:
I made a stop that would fit in the channel of the jig out of scrap:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12861854444/
The "tab" is to support the stop above the work. Note also the screw in the end of the stop:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12889939033/in/photostream/
That was to provide some fine adjustability. The screw butts up against a fixed block that I screwed in at the far end of the channel. I used one of the shelves that will mate with the stopped dado to set the length:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12889847285/in/photostream/
I screwed the whole jig into the work surface and screwed in a "fence" to the left of the jig for the work pieces to butt up against (for repeatability). Too bad I could only "repeat" twice with that setup; the other two pieces had to be mirror images, requiring me to reconfigure the "fence" on the other side.
I also (re-)discovered what I assume is an unavoidable part of woodworking. I spent the better part of two hours thinking up, building and modifying the jig. Then 2 minutes actually making each cut. I guess that's a good thing; it means the setup was easy to use. Here's video of the brief, most rewarding part of the process:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
…HD7VJFnCk&feature=youtu.be
Hey, you can even see me almost make a big mistake. :)
Next up: squaring up the ends of the dadoes.
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On 3/2/2014 5:41 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Cool. Welcome to the wonderful world of jigs, and now you will find out how quickly your space will fill with them :-0
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There is certainly nothing wrong in doing that but there is no particuar reason to do so as whatever goes into the dado can hide the minor gap if the dado end is left rounded.
Personally, I leave them rounded, would rather do something else with the time it takes to square them.
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On 3/3/2014 7:48 AM, dadiOH wrote:

thus the corners are rounded with a 1/4" radius. Unless I notch the ends of the shelves (which seems like at least as much work as squaring the corners), the gap will be visible.
Here's the design:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12861854444/in/set-72157641733510634
The stopped dadoes hold the small lower shelves.
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On 3/3/2014 9:05 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

It's generally quicker to cut a small rabbet in the end of the shelf than to clean up the end of the dado...all it takes is a dovetail saw and the perhaps a quick cleanup/pare to line w/ a (sharp) chisel. This is all outside work as opposed to squaring up the dado with all chisel work. If the size of the piece isn't too large you can also cut them out on the tablesaw.
But in the end, it's your choice...
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On 3/3/2014 10:05 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

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As everyone else said, right, that's what one does.

It's not, a moment or so with a dozuki or other similar and you are finished. An added benefit is that you can gain some wiggle room viv a vis the dado and what's going into it...dado too long?, notch covers it...dado too short?, cut a longer notch.
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On 3/3/2014 3:02 PM, dadiOH wrote:

(lengthwise) to cover it the way you suggest. But your way would have made it easier to set up the dado. Thanks for the tip.
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I also just leave them as is most of the time; an alternative is to round over the portion of the board that fits in the dado. A rasp works well and quickly.
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[Oops, the previous post had a bad link]
I really am having a productive weekend, by my standards anyway. Yesterday I cut some project parts using a router template that I made, a first for me. Today, another new adventure.
As suggested by Swingman, I redesigned my kitchen shelf unit using stopped dadoes.:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12861854444/
My task for today was to figure out a way to make them. I don't have dado blades, chiefly because I don't have a saw to put them on. I make dadoes with a router and a jig I built a couple of projects back. I decided to try to modify the jig with some sort of "stop". Here's what I came up with:
I made a stop that would fit in the channel of the jig out of scrap:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12889846435/
The "tab" is to support the stop above the work. Note also the screw in the end of the stop:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12889939033/in/photostream/
That was to provide some fine adjustability. The screw butts up against a fixed block that I screwed in at the far end of the channel. I used one of the shelves that will mate with the stopped dado to set the length:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/12889847285/in/photostream/
I screwed the whole jig into the work surface and screwed in a "fence" to the left of the jig for the work pieces to butt up against (for repeatability). Too bad I could only "repeat" twice with that setup; the other two pieces had to be mirror images, requiring me to reconfigure the "fence" on the other side.
I also (re-)discovered what I assume is an unavoidable part of woodworking. I spent the better part of two hours thinking up, building and modifying the jig. Then 2 minutes actually making each cut. I guess that's a good thing; it means the setup was easy to use. Here's video of the brief, most rewarding part of the process:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
…HD7VJFnCk&feature=youtu.be
Hey, you can even see me almost make a big mistake. :)
Next up: squaring up the ends of the dadoes.
--
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On 3/2/2014 4:49 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Well done!
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Actually, templates don't HAVE to be square. It is nice if they are but as long as the template has a continuous diameter/shape for the bearingto ride on, you are good to go...it is going to follow the most outward part of the template, isn't going to wobble in and out if the template isn't square. That assumes you are keeping the router flat and not tipping it.
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On 2/25/2014 7:59 AM, Swingman wrote:

See the "eWoodShop - Whiskey Barrel Base" just posted.
Was thinking about your original post when I was making the jig to do the curved bottom on profiled trim for the sides of the whiskey barrel bases, so added a couple of extra photos illustrating the above:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopWhiskeyBarrelBase?noredirect=1
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Got this in FWW's email letter this morning:
SUBJECT:Ultimate routing jig
Not that I necessarily think this is, as they say in their email, the "ultimate" pattern routing jig; and I can say with certainly that I don't think it is all that "clever" for a number of reasons - lack of adaptability to size and provisions for backing up edges to prevent tearout are a couple - nonetheless thought it was definitely germane to this discussion and might be useful to have in your bag of tricks:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/video/pattern-routing-jig-is-safer-and-faster.aspx?&lookup=auto&V18=&V19=&V20=&V21=&V22=&V23=&V24=&V25=&V26=&V53=&V54=&Taun_Per_Flag=true&&utm_source=email&utm_medium=eletter&utm_content=fw_eletter&utm_campaign=fine-woodworking-eletter
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On 6/7/2014 12:07 PM, Swingman wrote:

sets of pattern-routed parts. But it wasn't that difficult to simply remake the jig in my case.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/gdguarino/14316360681/in/set-72157644207411490
I made my MDF templates oversized, with a generous margin around three sides. That made it easy to simply screw in the fence pieces from underneath. I did need to countersink them, which added a step, but it was still very quick.
Here are my (relatively uninformed) concerns about the Fine Woodworking jig.
1. The toggle clamps are at a fixed distance apart. In the picture on this page
http://www.finewoodworking.com/workshop/article/smart-jig-for-pattern-routing.aspx
the clamps look too close together for the span of the piece, at least to me. I'd worry about something moving as the grain changed. Since they have the clamps on blocks, rather than on a continuous piece of wood, they'd be a drag to move. If I were to make something like this, I think I'd make the clamps more easily movable.
2. There's no "end fence". It seems to me that you'd get more repeatable (or at least quicker) registration with an end fence of some kind rather than lining up the template and the work by eye.
3. The router bit has to protrude further from the table. Does this matter? Or, more personally, does it matter if your router table setup is less than top quality? I'm not sure.
4. You can't see the work, without a mirror, anyway. I'm not sure why, but I liked seeing the work piece itself, at least the top edge, as the router did its job.
Having said all that, it does give me some interesting ideas. Thanks.
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On 6/9/2014 12:58 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

If I understand your question.
Not so much how high above the table, but how much the bit is not in the collet to get the height you need.
Best to go to longer bits, and 1/2" shanks and collets, if you need to get excess height, as you stand a better chance of less flex and run out causing problems, not to mention the danger of a bit coming loose.
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On 6/10/2014 7:59 PM, Swingman wrote:

Exactly the things I was wondering about. Someday I intend to build a router table and get a better router to put in it. But for now, it's 1/4" collets. I think I'll stick with my jig method for the moment.
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On 6/11/2014 6:29 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

For years I used an insert, in a flat piece of plywood, between two sawhorses to pretty good effect.
The biggest factors in doing it that way are time and precision.
If you have the time to futz with settings to get the precision you need, than it is certainly an option to get you started on using a "router table".
Two most important things for me, and the way I use a router table, are the rigidity and stability of the top and insert; and the ability to easily dial in the bit height.
Thus, and after finally having one, for me a "router lift" is an absolute necessity to get the most out of a router table setup for what I use one for.
With those two parameters taken care of, you can always build the actual table later.
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Tape is a temporary fastener. Expect just that when using it for a router hold down. The transfer of energy from the router (cutter) to the work varies with cut ter engagement and traction. Get inside tight curves, against grain, full thickness, and the cutter trac tion goes way up and the work goes its way. It's spontaneous and often unex pected for the novice. More on how to hold the work and minimize surprises. http://patwarner.com/templates2.html *****************************************
On Monday, February 24, 2014 10:07:16 AM UTC-8, Greg Guarino wrote:

saw and finish up with a template (maybe plexi) and a template bit on a rou ter table. I've seen videos where people affix the template to the work wit h double-stick tape. Would this work in my application? What kind of tape, exactly? How much of it? As another option, I was thinking I could leave th e piece a little long on one of the non-curved sides and screw the template into the wood in the "waste" area; cutting it off later. This seems less c onvenient, but perhaps more certain to work. --- This email is free from vi ruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active. http://www .avast.com
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On 2/24/2014 10:07 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

It works quite well as long as you have the following.
1. double sided tape 2. a smoothly sanded template 3. the correct router bit.
(1) Cheap carpet tape from Lowes or Home Depot. Use just a small amount, using too much will make taking the template almost impossible.
2. Make the template as smooth as possible because any lumps,bumps or imperfections will be shown in the finished piece.
3. You will end up needing a bottom or top bearing bit. In some cases, both types of bits are needed.
You can also buy a bit that has both a top and bottom bearing which can be fairly handy.
Browse through this list of bits to see some options.
http://www.freudtools.com/index.php/products?c=Router_CNC&cat=Trim_Bits&page=1
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