Talc as Rust Protection

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WoodMangler wrote:

Now let's also consider he knew what was in the FAQ before it was ever posted.
How do he keep it all straight?
UA100
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wrote:

Car wax ? bad idea. Your finishing attempts will be contaminated by silicones, yea unto the seventh generation.
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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 01:04:12 +0100, Andy Dingley

Andy-
not all car waxes have silicone. I think the trend in automotive products is away from silicone. one advantage of automotive paste waxes is that they seem (to me) to be formulated a bit harder than furniture waxes.
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 17:49:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

I knew commenting to a tablesaw wax thread was a bad idea...
I _know_ they don't all contain it. What I don't know is how to _prove_ they don't contain it. I don't even let silicone grease into the wood workshop - it's just far too much trouble when silicones show up where they shouldn't.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 02:26:05 +0100, Andy Dingley

; ^ )

read the label.

absolutely.
but the fact that it's sold for automotive use is no indicator that it contains silicone. also,don't assume that products sold for non-automotive purposes _don't_ contain silicone. I've seen it in the damnedest of places- spray cans of it for lubricating electrical equipment, for instance...
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 18:41:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

I managed to ruin a few batches of home-brewed oil finish until I spotted the problem.
I was using an ex- chemistry lab stirrer hotplate for heating my oil. At some past time, this must have been filled with a silicone oil, as a bain marie around the flask being heated. The remaining traces in the bowl were enough to "creep" into the inner flask I was using and wind up in my oil finish.
--
Smert' spamionam

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That's why I use Bowling Ally Wax or "Butcher's Wax" that is in a can at nearly every hardware store. I have a 50's era Craftsman TS which I bought used and waxed the table regularly. No build-up to speak of with this wax, which I also use on instruments. For reasons too long to mention , I haven't used the shop for several years and when I stopped I waxed the saw and today there is nary a spec of rust or anything. And our basement isn't AC, so in the summer when it's hot/humid, the floor sweats from being 4 feet below grade and the saw is fine.
--
Regards,
JP
"The measure of a man is what he will do
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I use it on climbing harness's for Navy PMS as a rust preventive, works better than 2190 TEP. You should also know it is considered a hazardous material by the military.

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Now is "it" the car wax or the talc?
Mike
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Talc is hazardous because if you get a quantity of it in the air, mixed with oxygen, it can be an explosive mixture! Just like a grain elevator. You may remember your chem. teacher putting lycopodium powder in a container and lighting it...well, talc can do that too! I'd also suppose that talc in the air in large quantities, should you drop a can of it, byt the fan in the shop for example, could affect breathing if you had no mask on, supposing the mask would stop particles that small.
That's why it's hazardous.
--
Regards,
JP
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wrote:

Like hell it can.
It's a fecking silicate ! It's already about as "burned" as you're going to get it.
Don't tell me - if the dust collector happens to suck it up, static electricity could discharge and blow the whole workshop up !
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Only if the rigid piping is PVC. ;-)
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patriarch < wrote:

And ungrounded:-) Joe
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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 13:13:51 -0400, Joe Gorman

and unfounded....
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Jim Polaski wrote:

Uh, Jim, leaving aside the fact that most of what you say above is just plain wrong, if this is the way you react to the thought of putting a little bit of talc on a power tool for rust protection I shudder to think what your reaction is going to be the first time you see somebody putting together a batch of cookies.
--
--John
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Jim Polaski wrote:

And imagine this scenario. Talc in the air, the dust collector is collecting and you went and used PVC pipe.
Makes Grandma flying jets (over the Sinai of course) while putting on make-up kinda pale by comparison.
UA100
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An old-timer once told me that he used talc on his cast iron saw table, so I tried some pool cue talc. And with good results. Talc repels moisture, but without the potential residue of oil. I've used it on all my cast iron saw tables and on my drill press table for years. It helps materials to slide on the table, it allows my cutoff sled to slide more easily in the groove of my table saw, and it has prevented corrosion. I replenish about every two months or so. I haven't tried it on the ways of the lathe, mostly because the headstock, tailstock, and banjo all slide on them. For those I use medium machine oil with good success, aside from the oil/wood dust residue that builds up. FWIW.
Max
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http://mineral.galleries.com/minerals/silicate/talc/talc.htm Chemistry: Mg3Si4O10(OH)2, Magnesium Silicate Hydroxide
I wonder if it would be too abrasive for that application anyway? I know talc is one of the softest mineral, but over time . . . . . .
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What kind* and brand* and model* of lathe is it?
Alex
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Jet 1442. I initially considered buying a more expensive lathe, but decided to invest somewhat more lightly to see if turning was for me. I'll probably upgrade some day, but for the time being, it's a great lathe at a great price. Not perfect, but it does everything fairly well and nothing poorly. It's all cast iron and weighs roughly 360lbs. with the cast legs. With the sand bags I added to a shelf between the legs it probably totals around 450lbs. Hope this helps.
Max
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