Talc as Rust Protection

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Kinda Interesting:
I was unpacking my new Powermatic 54A Jointer yesterday evening and noticed Powermatic's suggestion for table rust protection. Sprinkle talcum powder on the table and rub it in with a blackboard eraser. They say the fine powder fills pores in the metal and blocks moisture intrusion. Should be done weekly.
Anyone else heard of or tried this?
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Never Tried it but I have been using WD-40 on my lathe bed and I have not had a problem with rust so far. My lathe is about 2 years old and no rust.

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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 09:54:47 -0400, "Steven Raphael"

WD-40's rust prevention lasts about three days. Just ask anyone who's ever worked in a bicycle shop where customers use it as chain lube. <G>
Would you have had rust if you'd used nothing?
Barry
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wrote:

You do realize that the WD 40 does not last on a chain because it gets slung off. I use on 3 bike chains when putting the bikes up for extend periods of time. No Rust.
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 21:32:57 GMT, "Leon"

It dries quickly, there's nothing to fling off!
Don't you live in Texas? You probably wouldn't get rust if you used cooking oil. <G> Here in the Northeast, metal can rust if you look at it wrong, and all the chains we get that were "lubed" with WD-40 are rust buckets.
The only part of a chain that needs lube are the internal pins, within the bushings. Chain manufacturers, like Shimano, Sachs, and SRAM, install a grease when they assemble the chain. WD-40 will remove this grease and leave nothing. If you really want to prevent rust and lube the chain, without buying expensive "bike specific" products, use chain saw bar oil or air tool oil. Wipe as much as you can off after you apply it. The film will last a good long time. Even better are the dry lubes and wax based lubes sold for the purpose.
Anything left on the outside of a chain simply attracts dirt, which grinds your expensive chainrings and cassettes away.
Your chains may not rust, but they're no longer lubricated, either, if you're using WD-40.
Barry Who puts 4-5000 miles a year in a bike saddle, some of it off-road.
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I learned to use ATF on my bike chains almost 35 years ago. Once I clean them off I soak them in a tin can and heat the ATF on my stove at a very low heat. ATF is flammable so you have to be very cautious when doing this. After the chains have soaked overnight I hang the chain vertically and let if drip back into the same can until all the excess has drained. The lubrication is good for several months of hard riding.
Bonehenge wrote:

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Weekly? Sounds more like a minimum preventative method. IMHO there are much better methods.
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Well, that's what I thought. I have been using Slipit for a couple of years with pretty good success, but thought this was kinda interesting. Works on you feet, works on your jointer.
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years
on
Good for man or machine!
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Yep - and machines are good for the man!
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RonB wrote:

Well, if you can find talc powder. Most of what we call talc powder seems to be marketed as 'baby powder' and is actually largely corn starch if memory serves.
Talc powder is finely ground soapstone I think - not sure I'd want that getting into my bearings and such. Think I'll stick to waxing the surface of my machines...
...Kevin
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: RonB wrote:
: Well, if you can find talc powder. Most of what we call talc powder : seems to be marketed as 'baby powder' and is actually largely corn : starch if memory serves.
And a good thing too, as a lot of talc contains asbestos.
    -- Andy Barss
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Andy Barss

And talc is in crayons.
UA100
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On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 21:13:21 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss
No, this is quite unreasonable scare mongering. In no possible way does "a lot of talc" contain asbestos.
Talc and asbestos are both amphibole minerals (a whole lot of minerals are amphiboles - if it's a calcium / magnesium silicate, chances are that it's an amphibole). _Some_ talc deposits have associated asbestos deposits with them. _Some_ talc minerals have been mined from these deposits, leading to contamination with asbestos.
In _ONE_ infamous case, a study of the talc filler used for making children's crayons was found to contain a miniscule, but detectable, level of asbestos. Cue instant hysteria from the "Think of the _CHILDREN_" brigade. This trivial and insignificant case has been blown up out of all proportion ever since.
If you're selecting talc to make cosmetic grade talcum powder, you didn't use these deposits anyway. You wanted something that milled finely, and the last thing you need is some tough old fibre in there.
Got any houseplants ? Any of them potted with vermiculite (those white spongy granules, to improve water retention) ? You'll get more asbestos exposure from those than you will from talc. In the waords of that great sage, John Otway, "Be careful of the flowers 'cos I'm sure they're gonna get you, yeah"
Now flame away. I'm so chock-full of asbestos I'm fire-proof.
--
Smert' spamionam

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On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 01:14:54 +0100, Andy Dingley

I fear that Mr. Barss may be putting lots of that crap into poor, unsuspecting students' minds on a daily basis, to their detriment. I have at least 4 of his emails in my killfile and just added another one this week, when he came back with a new one. His info seems as valid as that of BAD and Joe Woody Woodpecker's. <sigh>

More info here: http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/fs012-01/fs012-01.pdf
We all now know that inhaling organic substances into our lungs is muy peligroso, but the USGS points out that inhaling large quantities of asbestos fibers is even more dangerous to smokers. (People who are already killing themselves. Doh!)

Another dire hazard in working with plants is the exposure to another deadly chemical: Dihydrogen Monoxide. Scary stuff, and it's more deadly than asbestos. More here: http://www.dhmo.org/

MOST installed asbestos is not the deadly type, nor is it in everyday contact with anyone's lungs, but the guys testing for and removing it are making MILLIONS. What a scam!
Other famous and current scams in the USA: WMDs, Santa, Tooth Fairy, Sandman, Easter Bunny, Welfare, Social Security, Homeland Security, Shrub leadership, Global Warming, Gun laws, War Against Drugs, It's For The Children, Fair & Balanced Media.
Can -you- add some to this list?
============================================================= Like peace and quiet? Buy a phoneless cord. http://www/diversify.com/stees.html Hilarious T-shirts online =============================================================
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"Larry Jaques" wrote in message ...

It ain't the first time.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/04/04
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<snip>

Larry, the one on Global Warming is unfortunately mis-classified as a scam. It is happening. And, no, it's not "junk science"- as if "W" were familiar with either. Science _is_ the search for the truth, after all.
Regards, John
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You are partially correct. Science should be the search for truth. The whole global warming issue is too politically charged to be treated as such. There have been some recent studies that question the leading research into global warming. Of interest is the Mann et. al. study that introduces the "hockey stick" graph showing that in the last century temps have been rising dramatically. Other researchers using their data and computer code have found that regardless of the data fed into the model, the graph has the same shape.
If you are interested, start here: http://www.technologyreview.com/articles/04/10/wo_muller101504.asp
--
Al Reid

A government big enough to give you everything you want...
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Science searches for fact. "Truth" is a philosophical concept.
Science answers the question how. Philosophy (or religion) tries to answer why.
That said, I wouldn't let SWMBO sit on any talc-protected tool. http://www.bcaction.org/Pages/SearchablePages/1997Newsletters/Newsletter042F.html

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Several years ago I was at a meeting at which it was suggested that the long-haired researchers in attendance be care to not say "Global Warming" instead they should say "Global Change."
Makes sense, especially for the ones studying plate tectonics.
--

FF

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