Taking apart and rebuilding


Hi,
Im interested in creating a stand similar to the following: http://www.tameshigiri.com/make_a_stand_2.html
However, I need the base to be separated from the post. The only problem I foresee is it's "strength" as I will have to take it apart (to transport easier) and set it back up repeatedly. Using screws or lag bolts would be ideal but after a few times I'm sure I'll have to redrill new holes. Does anyone have any suggestions for making this more sturdy for the repetitious setup and takedowns? I was thinking some bolts to go all the way through the base and post to other side and using wingnuts or something. Maybe metal plates at the base to prevent the holes from widening? I'm pretty handy, but just don't do much woodworking to know all the tips and tricks you guys have. Thanks for any insight!
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On 17 Aug 2006 13:57:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Just off the top of my head, if, as you say, you're going to be taking apart and reassembling repeatedly, what you want to do is avoid having the connection devices (bolts) also function as the locating device(s). I'd be inclined to add dowels and holes (two) in each piece to locate the part and then use through bolts (now the bolts can be as sloppy as you want, which, by the way, aids assembly/disassembly).
Each pair of bolts will clamp two opposing base arms. Obviously you'll need to have two of them located in a diagonal arrangement and the other two parallel to the floor (so they don't interfere with each other), or some arrangement of your own choosing that will do the job. All four on the diagonal won't work.
I like the bolts and wing nut idea. Get some of the plastic handled "fixture" nuts--much easier to work with than hardware store wing nuts. If you tried to use carriage bolts, you'd eventually, as you suspect, jimmy the holes.
Another thing to consider: when you first assemble this thing, all four of the legs are going to sit nicely level on the floor. Over time, the locaters might not keep everything perfectly aligned, and the stand may develop a wobble. You can counteract much of this by relieving the four legs so that there's a "pad" out at the end. The downside of this is that all of the weight on the post will then transferred through the joint at the bottom and out to the feet. That adds a lot of stress to the joint where the legs meet the posts. Might not be worth the modification, but being aware of it means it won't be a surprise when the wobble does develop and you'll have a...er, uh, leg up on a potential solution.
Good luck.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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What about hanger bolts? Will not have to be removed from the post. Only disadvantage would be the bolts sticking out, and keeping track of the wing bolts ans washers.
If this will not work try removing only 1 screw and pivit the leg up for storage and transport.

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Add a threaded (nut) to the base and a bolt to the post. See http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID058
Watch wrap
Dave
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On 17 Aug 2006 13:57:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Try these:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product.asp?pid606-BI-D
Then you can use a knob with a bolt that fits the insert as well, and you don't need any tools. It helps to use a drill press when installing the insert to keep it straight- if you don't have one, they're common enough that a friend or neighbor probably has one somewhere.
Wingnuts can work- but I used that route on my router table fence, but it's a pain for a few reasons. First, the wing nut will tear up the wood if you don't have a washer under it- not a big problem, but they are easy to lose if you are assembling and disassembling frequently. Second, the threads on the bolts will ream out the hole over time with repeated assembly and disassembly, eventually beginning to look ugly, and finally making the hole large enough for the head of the bolt to pull right through (This can go the other way as well- if the holes are too snug, it's very difficult to tighten a wing nut until they wear out a bit) And third, if you don't offset them properly, you're going to have bolts blocking each other- not a big problem if it's a big stand, but it'll be a pain if you're using 1.5" stock or something.
The threaded inserts are really the way to go- they'll cost a little bit more (a couple of dollars, tops,) but they're a whole lot easier to work with in the long run.
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Prometheus wrote:

Ok, i'm liking the threaded inserts idea. I was about to buy some the other day when i noticed they had 2 types, brass and umm..steel? (gray metal like screws). I know brass is probably softer and used commonly for plumbing items but would it be too soft for taking apart and putting up repeatedly? I guess my questions is do I go with the "metal" ones or the brass?
Also should I use a glue or soemthing to give it extra sticking power before putting the inserts in?
THanks!
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T-nuts will work too.
As others have stated there will likely be a problem with wobble. Leveling feet on the toes would be one solution.
Another way to solve the problem is to use a trangular post rather than a square one.... A three-legged stool never wobbles. If I were to do that, I would pitch the legs downward slightly to that the stand always stood on it's toes; you can still have wobble with 3 legs flat to the ground.
-Steve
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