Taking a 1/4 slice out of a log?

Hiya Folks, Not quite fine woodworking here but I'm looking to build a couple of dressers for the cabin. I'm planning to build the carcasses and drawers pretty much like I would if it were fine furniture but want to put logs at the corners. I'm thinking about removing a slice of the log (1/4 of it if looking from the top) so it wraps around the corners. I did this once before with a handsaw and it took a whole lotta work. I'm wondering if there is a SAFE alternative (ie. table saw or router or ???). I've been pondering a jig for either the router or table saw but haven't really come up with much that I feel safe about. Any ideas? Thanks, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry, I might add that I thought of a chainsaw but honestly, I'm not sure I'm good enough with one to avoid kickback. I'm pretty good at cutting firewood but not sure about this! Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Cubby" wrote:

> dressers for the cabin. I'm planning to build the carcasses and drawers > pretty much like

corners. <snip>
About the only safe way to approach this problem is with a gantry approach.
You need a fixxture that will clamp the part to a gantry bed while first cut is made, then index 90 degrees and repeat.
You will need a left and a right hand fixture.
As for the gantry, it would be a design and build item using a circular saw.
Probably take as much or more time to design and build as the final product, and cost about the same.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The underside of the nose won't kick, just anything north of 4:00. Keep your end of the bar low and take your time, the chain on your saw didn't come filed for ripping. You'll still need to plane the inside of the channel true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In fact - I have done exactly this. Had to notch logs to make corner pillars on my garage, and just used my chain saw.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cubby wrote:

Bandsaw
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok. How would I use a bandsaw to do this? I probably need to remove the "quarter slice" if you will, from 40" of the logs. Unless I had a massive bandsaw (and it would be huge!), I'm missing how to do this. Maybe I'm missing somthing here so let me know how you'd do it. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Cubby wrote:

I missed the "quarter slice" :(
One way to do that is with a hand held circular saw with depth of cut set appropriately. A lot depends on the diameter of the logs - gotta be small enough so that the blade at max depth will reach half way. Of course, you could do the same thing with a table saw, just gotta keep the log from rolling by temporarily nailing to a flat board.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You've got this, right: ____ ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ---- You want this: ____ ( ) ( ) ( ____) ( | ( | --|
Depending on the log, you could take two passes on the table saw. Make a jig to hold the log securely in place (remember, round rolls) and make your cuts. It might be the fastest way to do it... (but not necessarily the safest.) Maybe a circular saw would be best?
If you don't mind using a little glue, you could cut the log in to quarters, and glue the sections back together. (Actually, you'd half the log, then quarter one side.) This can be done with a band saw. (It might be a little safer.)
Puckdropper
--
Marching to the beat of a different drum is great... unless you're in
marching band.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
omcast.com:

Cut your logs a little over length and screw a square piece of plywood on either end just big enough so the log is inside the square. Then bridge between the two squares with this circular saw jig: http://www.womeninwoodworking.com/tips/startingpoints7.cfm Make the the first cut
Move your bridge to the next side of the square and make the second cut.
Trim log to length.
Have a gimlet and admire your work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the square pieces of plywood are a good idea, but why not just run it over the tablesaw? Don't hit the screws in the process.
montyhp
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Consider what would happen when the plywood passes off the back edge of the table saw.
- Owen -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A sliding sled that follows the fence seems to be the key.
How long will it be? How about you fasten a square piece on the top and bottom, and then a third reusable piece on the side connecting the two?
Then cut away the excess at the ends to hide the screw marks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cubby, I'd do it this way.
1. Using 3/4 ply, build a long narrow "shoe box" with no top, with inside dimensions large enough to hold your largest log. At the center of each end of your shoe box, drill a hole. 2. Cut each log to length so that it just fits inside the box. Drill a pilot hole to accept a screw in the center of each end of each log. 3. Place your log in the box and attach by screwing through the center holes into each end of the log. 4. Pre-drill and drive several additional screws through the end of the box and into each end of the log to hold it securely. 5. REMOVE CENTER SCREWS! 6. Place the box on the table saw with the open side away from the fence. 7. Adjust fence and blade height so that the blade reaches the center screw holes. 8. Make one cut with the table saw. 9. Replace both center screws. 10. Remove the rest of the screws and rotate the log 90 degrees. Replace the attachment screws. 11. REMOVE CENTER SCREWS! 12. Make the second cut. 13. Repeat steps 1-9 for the rest of the logs.
DonkeyHody "Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: Hiya Folks, : Not quite fine woodworking here but I'm looking to build a couple of : dressers for the cabin. I'm planning to build the carcasses and drawers : pretty much like : I would if it were fine furniture but want to put logs at the corners.
You might be interested in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HKA1mvhV5Y&feature=related

It doesn't have to do with your immediate question; it shows how to make rustic furniture with "natural" surfaces.
--- Chip
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks folks. These "logs" are only about 3"-4" in diameter so not huge. I will probably have 20-24 to do so building a jig is probably worth the effort. Plenty of ideas thrown out here so that is most appreciated. I may even try the chainsaw method as well. Thanks folks for helping me out! Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.