Tailed Vs Stumpy Drills

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I promised the missus a (melamine) cabinet for the laundry, but to allow for shelf locations I needed to drill lots of holes. Since it has been a while since I last used my electric drills I dragged them out and gave them their day in the sun.
I'd forgotten how much faster and more powerful they are than the DeWalt 12v, which, although a useful tool, isn't close to being in the same class.
Another thing I noticed is the finish quality of the hole (using the same bit). The Makita drill repeatedly left a crisp edge whilst the DeWalt chipped the edges. I think this is due to the 5mm bit needing the speed of the Makita, which the DeWalt can't match. Even my heavy duty Pentagon left crisp, effortless edges.
Although they are convenient, the results of the cordless drill don't come close to the pow-whirred variety so, I think I am going to drop back to having cords everywhere for a while.
Greg
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Convenience has overcome sense in a lot of ways, that's for sure.
I used to tell the kids at the shop that tailed were drills, the battery operated were drivers.
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Snip

Agreed, IMHO the corded ones are still better for many applications where speed or power is needed. They certainly make more since economically. If only they had a multiple speed gear box like the cordless and an electronic brake.
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It's the braking which makes me prefer the cordless. My Bosch VSR, even though it has a two-speed gearbox, takes too long to wind down. For high speed and sudden stops, I use an air drill. NOT a Festool *LOL*, but an off-shore 30 dollar jobbie. Keeping it oiled, it has plenty of torque and speed for all-day use. It's been great for 5+ years. I use yet another airdrill with a mixing attachment to mix up my laquer and keeping those arc-ing brushes away from the fumes.
Rob
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Yeah BUT does it have a keyless chuck??? LOL
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*G*..Busted. Nope, it doesn't...doesn't have 'reverse' either...or 'variable speed' for that matter.... I use a 5/16 braided rubber hose, no air coupling on the drill but there is one about 4-feet from the drill and that hooks up to a normal air hose. Very handy for tight corners, and very light weight.
I had one summer-student convinced that the drill's output is 5HP because the compressor motor is rated at 5 HP. *G*
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wrote:

I discovered long ago that the step drill bit for my Kreg jig works a lot better in a corded drill than the cordless. It's all in the speed. Even in high range the cordless doesn't turn fast enough to make the quick, easy hole that the corded drill does. I'm not ready to forego the stumpies entirely; they are far too useful and convenient; but there certainly are occasions when I prefer the tailed boys.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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I discover that in the owners manual. IIRC the rep at the show recomended a higher speed corded drill.
It's all in the speed.

IMHO corded drills lag way behind cordless when it comes to finessing a screw into wood.
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On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 14:52:12 GMT, "Leon"

What's that? Is that like directions? I have a box full of them somewhere.

No question about it. That would be one of the activities in which I prefer the cordless.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 15:54:12 +0000, LRod

unless you're building a fence... my neighbor has a corded screw gun that kicks ass... when we did my fence, he did all the screws on 130' of fence in about 7 hours... we figured later that between the stringers and pickets, he drove about 1,300 2 1/2" screws that day..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Yabbut, now you're talking apples and oranges. I have a corded DW deck/drywall screwgun that as you say, "kicks ass". That nose piece for adjusting the head depth is there for a reason. I took mine off once for some reason, and sunk a 3 1/2" screw most of the way through a tubafor before I could pull away or get off the trigger. Used it for the drywall during recent remodel at Daughter's house, and it was great. Consistent head placement, where the cordless with a torque clutch would do just OK, sometimes not setting the head, sometimes setting it too deep.
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 09:20:34 -0500, "Norman D. Crow"

I've seen a few nice cordless screw guns, but can't imagine how many batteries you'd need charged to do a fence.. sometimes it's better to just run an old fashioned extension cord..
mac
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DeWalt makes a gun that I'm saving up for right now that uses the drywall gun actuation (motor runs but bit doesn't spin until you press on it) but a slip-clutch like most cordless drill/drivers. Apparently, sheet-metal guys use them all the time. I've been framing heavy gauge steel studs lately, and the old B&D cordless isn't really up to the task. Hence the clutch-type gun, which spins slower and has more torque. For general application, *that* screw gun beats a drywall screw shooter. However, they don't call it a DRYWALL screw shooter because some other tool does a better job. Personally, I think that the DeWalt people, in some crazy scheme to make money, are manufacturing a whole store full of tools that I cannot possibly live without :)
-Phil Crow
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"Leon" wrote in message ...

I agree, my comments were in relation to drilling only. For driving, I use a Metabo "zucchini" driver which is without peer.
Groggy
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wrote:

Hi Greg, Is that the 4.8v 'Powergrip'? Looked at one as my old B&D is getting tired. The Metabo is a bit pricy here but the size seems ideal for getting into small places as opposed to the long B&D. BTW How is the saw?
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 06:09:37 +0200, Phil Hansen

Howzit Phil!
Yes, the Metabo is a Powergrip.
<http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pricing=INC&pf_id 564&lkidX&cid=ONVBSPQYMMLCCIGTEQ63ZJ3DZRGYXKP9>
One of the things I like about it most people would probably think of as a drawback - it can't be used as a drill. Unless you are desperate of course. I particularly wanted a dedicated driver due to the fact every time I had to drive a screw I had to replace a drill bit first, I found it took a lot of time to fiddle around, hence the dedicated driver.
This thing has incredible torque and, once you get used to the funny feel of it, it seems to be able to get into just about anywhere. Cabinet work is great with it. I got one as a retirement gift to myself a while ago (before I started a new job - hehe). I can't recall needing to recharge a battery during the day, and I always put one on charge once it is cold (usually first thing in the morning). If you can, get the holster and toss the torch (flashlight Keith).
<http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pricing=INC&pf_id 576&recno=3&cid=ONVBSPQYMMLCCIGTEQ63ZJ3DZRGYXKP9>
BUFF the new saw is the best thing I have bought in years, Just being able to rip a large panel perfectly square first go is such a time saver. Miters are perfect 45 deg and it has so much power I am treating it with a lot of respect. I would have preferred a left-tilt (since that's what my previous saw was) but I am getting used to BUFF's way of doing things. Dust collection isn't perfect but I am working on it, it still spits a bit out in the 7 o'clock position.
I now have GP, plywood (300mm) and dado (250mm) blades.
cheers and Happy New Year
Greg
PS Did SA get any large surges from the tsunami? I only saw minimal activity on the north west shores (I wonder what the effect will be on temperatures in the coming years).
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wrote:
Thanks for the update on the saw.

Haven't heard of anything serious. There were reports of a few abnormal tides but the experts say it may or may not have been an effect. The news is more concerned with our cricket results <G>. Just doesn't get any better.
Cheers and happy New Year.
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On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 06:09:37 +0200, Phil Hansen

Howzit Phil!
Yes, the Metabo is a Powergrip.
<http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pricing=INC&pf_id 564&lkidX&cid=ONVBSPQYMMLCCIGTEQ63ZJ3DZRGYXKP9>
One of the things I like about it most people would probably think of as a drawback - it can't be used as a drill. Unless you are desperate of course. I particularly wanted a dedicated driver due to the fact every time I had to drive a screw I had to replace a drill bit first, I found it took a lot of time to fiddle around, hence the dedicated driver.
This thing has incredible torque and, once you get used to the funny feel of it, it seems to be able to get into just about anywhere. Cabinet work is great with it. I got one as a retirement gift to myself a while ago (before I started a new job - hehe). I can't recall needing to recharge a battery during the day, and I always put one on charge once it is cold (usually first thing in the morning). If you can, get the holster and toss the torch (flashlight Keith).
<http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp?pricing=INC&pf_id 576&recno=3&cid=ONVBSPQYMMLCCIGTEQ63ZJ3DZRGYXKP9>
BUFF the new saw is the best thing I have bought in years, Just being able to rip a large panel perfectly square first go is such a time saver. Miters are perfect 45 deg and it has so much power I am treating it with a lot of respect. I would have preferred a left-tilt (since that's what my previous saw was) but I am getting used to BUFF's way of doing things. Dust collection isn't perfect but I am working on it, it still spits a bit out in the 7 o'clock position.
I now have GP, plywood (300mm) and dado (250mm) blades.
cheers and Happy New Year
Greg
PS Did SA get any large surges from the tsunami? I only saw minimal activity on the north west shores (I wonder what the effect will be on temperatures in the coming years).
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I know you are speaking from experience. I'm confused by the factory specs. In the Dewalt line, the corded drills actually turn slower than the cordless. In fact, the fastest drill made by Dewalt that I could find was their 1/2" heavy duty cordless (3 speed with top speed range 0-2000 rpm). I've got a Dewalt 18 volt drill and its always seemed as fast on its highest speed as my 3/8" corded drill. Maybe the lower voltage drills slow down under load?
Bob
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The older 2 speeds don't spin all the fast. Mine is 400 on low and 1100 on high. I'm sure the 3rd speed improves the speed. IIRC my corded drill spins at 2200.
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