Tage Frid died

Here's the obit:
Tage P. Frid, 88; known as nation's 'dean of woodworking' 01:00 AM EDT on Thursday, May 6, 2004
MIDDLETOWN -- Tage P. Frid, 88, of 303 Valley Rd., and formerly of Foster, a master woodworker, a professor emeritus at Rhode Island School of Design, and a former school-committee chairman, died Tuesday at Village House, Newport.
A teacher and lecturer for 50 years, Mr. Frid had been a member of the faculty of the School for American Craftsmen, first at Alfred University and later at the Rochester Institute of Technology, before he became a professor and the head of the woodworking and design program at RISD in 1962. He retired from RISD, in the late 1980s, and was named a professor emeritus.
Still known as the "dean of American woodworking" at the time of his retirement, he is best recalled as a teacher of aspiring furniture designers and woodworkers.
His work was not limited to teaching, however, or even to woodworking. Mr. Frid had served as a consultant to the Mystic Seaport Museum, the International Mint and the former Rhode Island Hospital Trust bank, among others; as a designer of mass-produced for the Howard Johnson's and Treadway motel chains; and as an interior designer to clients including the Danish government.
He had been a partner in Donovan and Frid, a design and woodworking firm specializing in interiors and handmade furniture. He was a co-founder of Shop One, in Rochester, N.Y., a shop owned and operated by craftsmen, and ESPAN, a manufacturer of small desk accessories.
Examples of his woodworking have showcased in many publications, and added to the permanent collections of the Smithsonian Institution, the Renwick Gallery, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design.
His altars and crosses have been installed in many churches, among them, the Church of St. John the Divine-Episcopal, in Wickford Village, North Kingstown, and the Episcopal Church of Mitchell, S.D.
"When I've made it, I sell it," he said in a 1967 Sunday Journal interview. "Usually, after a very short time, I can't stand living with it." This philosophy drew the ire of his wife on at least one occasion, when during a luncheon party, the movers arrived to take away the dining room set.
Mr. Frid also was the author of a three-volume set entitled Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking, and had been a contributing editor, since 1975, to the bimonthly trade journal Fine Woodworking.
His long and productive career drew him many awards. He was named a Fellow of the American Crafts Council, for his distinguished achievement, in 1980, and was the recipient of an honorary doctorate of fine arts from RISD, in 1984; the Governor's Award of the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts, in 1992; and in 2001, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Furniture Society.
Mr. Frid completed his education as a journeyman in 1934, after a five-year apprenticeship under master craftsman Gronlund Jensen. He went on to graduate in 1940 from the Vedins School and to receive a degree in 1944 from the Graduate School for Interior Design, both in Copenhagen.
He was the husband of Emma Jacobsen; they had been married for 57 years. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, the son of the late Albert Frid and Camilla Mortensen, he had lived in Denmark and Iceland before immigrating to this country in 1948.
Mr. Frid was a former member of the Foster School Committee, and had served as the board's chairman for several years.
Besides his wife, he leaves a daughter, Ann Randall of Middletown; a son, Peter Frid of Madbury, N.H.; and six grandsons.
A memorial service will be held at a later date. Burial will be private.
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A true loss to woodworking, woodworkers and the world in general. He shared his knowledge with many and his sense of humor with a few less. Not many established masters have that special twinkle in their eye and always the hint of a smile.
A good man is gone. But his affect/effect will be around for a long time.
I still cringe a little when, on one of his tapes, he breaks out the belt sander, turns it upside down and sharpens the chisels he's about to use to cut perfect half blind dovetails. And I'm always astounded by how a does/did such delicate cuts with his HUGE bow saw!
Think I'll break out his Dovetails video tonight - and chuckle when he takes chisel to belt sander.
charlie b
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I had the honor of meeting Tage Frid when I was working at The Cutting Edge in San Diege Ca. I will always remember how kind and gentle a man he was and the willingness he had to share and pass on his wisdom. What a nice man! Heaven must have one heck of a work shop, don't you think?
Mike from American Sycamore
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Where woods always dry and straight, chisels never dull, frogs never crack - and there are plenty of 220V outlets.
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"charlie b" writes:

Think that probably comes under the heading of talent or perhaps is a measure of the time in grade required to acquire certain skills.
I've seen belt sanders used in some unusual ways.
I've also had a chance to observe some tradesman do some absolutely amazing things with the simplest of tools, not necessarily limited to wood working.
Ever watch an old time long shoreman work?
Like the concrete finisher, makes a tough job look easy.
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Thu, 06 May 2004 23:43:58 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

This is what I always loved about his writing. "Special" jigs were simple and often made on the spot. No micrometers, wonder tools, or marketing marvels.
When I first read his stuff I had already bought into magazine marketing, and didn't believe things really could be that simple. Upon TRYING the guy's methods, I found out that they can be. All it takes is some basic knowledge and lots of practice.
Barry
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RIP Mr. Frid. The woodworking world has lost a great one.
Jim

a
and
professor
designers
Treadway
Rhode
the
interview.
a
the
1980,
in
Society.
five-year
from
served
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On Thu, 06 May 2004 19:39:12 GMT, "James D. Kountz" <jkountz@(remove this)citlink.net> wrote:>RIP Mr. Frid. The woodworking world has lost a great one.
Indeed. I don't think he was the world's greatest woodworker, and doubt that many would think he was a great designer, but his ability to _teach_ the skills is unsurpassed.
If you don't have at least the first two volumes, go and get them.
--
Smert' spamionam

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<< ndeed. I don't think he was the world's greatest woodworker, and doubt that many would think he was a great designer, but his ability to _teach_ the skills is unsurpassed. >><BR><BR>
Baloney, I saw his stuff at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. His piece was alongside Maloofs, Osgoods, Knox's (Gary Bennet if you don't know), Krenov and Fortune. Maybe you can decide which was better, but then you wold be the only one.
He grew to be so well known as a writer and teacher, his abilities as a woodworker became less well known. Well, his workmanship was great.
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On Thu, 06 May 2004 18:17:53 GMT, "Mike in Mystic"

Damn!
I can't even quantify what I've learned from him.
Barry
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

I shall forever cherish the memory of Tage's seminar I was privileged to attend a few years ago at Highland Hardware.
A real gentleman, and a wonderful inspiration to myself, and many, many others.
Thank you, Tage.
Henry Bibb
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Wow. I never met him in person but still feel sad he's gone. I still get a kick out of rereading his books and laugh at his very no-nonsense commentary. The video I have is similar.
I googled his name and could not come up with a single mention of his death in their news portal. Search on "Friends finale" however and it finds almost 3,000 items...
Anyway,Thanks Tage.
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Interesting enough I was looking for info on his death and found that his grandson died last year. Of course this is assuming this is the same Tage Frid. City is the same. Check it out.
------------------- Nicholas Frid UNH student
Nicholas Frid, 18, of Hayes Road, Madbury, died suddenly on Thursday, Oct. 2, 2003.
Born Dec. 12, 1984, he is the son of Peter A. and Katherine (Oxx) Frid of Madbury.
Nicholas attended elementary school in Juneau, Alaska, and Corpus Christi, Texas. He later attended the Oyster River Middle School and graduated from Oyster River High School, class of 2003.
Nicholas was a freshman at UNH, and was on the UNH Freshman Crew Team. He was also a junior sailing instructor with the UNH sailing program. Nicholas had been part of the Oyster River Russian Exchange Program, NH Youth Chorus and was a Great Bay Rower for five years as co-captain.
Survivors include his parents, Peter and Katherine Frid; grandparents, (((Tage and Emma Frid of Middletown, R.I))).; two brothers, Oliver Tage Frid of Denton, Texas, and Erik Peter Frid of Madbury; two aunts, Ann Frid Randall and Sally P. Bloomfield, both of Middletown, R.I.; and one uncle, Gordon D. Oxx of Richmond. Nick also leaves his special friend Jennifer DeFreese of Hampton Falls.
-------------------------

a
and
professor
designers
Treadway
Rhode
the
interview.
a
the
1980,
in
Society.
five-year
from
served
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Sad...too young.
RB
Rich wrote:

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