Tack cloth to remove sanding dust?

The saga continues...
Yes, still working on that first project (book shelf). I have everything cut to size and shape and sanded down to 220. So I'm ready for construction and glue up. That is, as soon as I get that 220 dust off the pieces.
So I hear I don't want to wipe down with a damp rag, because that will raise the grain on the wood again. Advice seems to be to use a tack cloth. I hear you can buy them (the easy but expensive route), make them (mineral spirits and a rag???), and the adult ed instructor said he just uses a rag with Endust (first I've ever heard/read of).
So what's a beginner to do?
Thanks
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Corey asks:

Yeah, well a standard tack cloth will work--cost is usually well under a buck. To make a tack cloth, get some cheesecloth, fold it about four times to make a pad about 4" on a side, drip in some of the finish you're going to use, thinned a bit. Work the finish through the cheescloth, and wipe. Store the homemade cloth in a closed container that doesn't leak air. Storage doesn't work for shellac tack cloths.
Also, Norton makes a microfiber "tack" cloth that's a marvel to use. I'm told that refills for the Swiffer also work well.
Charlie Self "When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas Paine
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 23:23:35 +0000, Charlie Self wrote:

Based on somebody's post here, I went to the fabric store and asked for microfiber cloth. The helpful clerk pointed out two kinds for our purposes; one is a moleskin texture, the other is glossy. Some tips from her: 1. Use the "front" side only. (Sewing people have a word for it.) 2. Keep it folded, front side in, in a plastic bag with a dryer sheet to inhibit static. (The dryer sheet thing sounds half-baked to me, but what the heck.)
I got half a yard. So far, it works great for cleaning glasses. Haven't had to tack anything yet.
Apparently the word is out. Photo and astro guys, and now wood, popping into fabric stores all over the world...
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


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construction
raise
about this action? Warren

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Warren Weber writes:

What happens when you build something that doesn't relocate that well? Too, moving the item back into the shop can raise dust. Further, there's always the chance of oil and water in your compressed air unless you filter it as you were using it with a spray gun.
But, yeah, I blow things off, too, but inside and wearing a dust mask while I do it. So far, no problems (but I don't do it often and I've only been doing it for 20-25 years). Sometimes in really dusty conditions, the dust partially resettles on the project; time for the microfiber or other tack rag then.
Charlie Self "When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas Paine
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I'll keep an eye out for oil coming through but so far I only get a bit of moisture adter blowing for a while. I have been blowing vs. tacking for about 15 years now.

I generally have the garage door open, blow towards the open garage door and have a fan blowing with the project between the fan and the door. Works fine for me. Fortunately the big wide door opening lets every thing get blown out.

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Expensive? I bought one a couple of weeks ago for 88 cents. It's well worth just getting one from the store, IMO. Otherwise, if they've got an air line, you could just blow it off. (Just make sure there isn't water in the compressor first by blowing it against the table or something)

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: : Expensive? I bought one a couple of weeks ago for 88 cents. It's : well worth just getting one from the store, IMO. Otherwise, if : they've got an air line, you could just blow it off. (Just make sure : there isn't water in the compressor first by blowing it against the : table or something) :
Agree on both counts. If I'm lazy and using air, I deflect it off the back of my hand - I do so by holding the nozzle straight down and direct the airflow accordingly. Sometimes I can feel a bit of moisture on my hand but usually not. Caution: do not hold it too close to your hand!
-Brian
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On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 05:23:58 -0400, "Cherokee-LTD"

I just blow it against my hand, too- but not knowing the situation of the person posting, I didn't want to suggest that too readily. Some people find compressed air painful and/or damaging.

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On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 19:46:04 -0500, Prometheus

I've heard that getting an air bubble in your blood stream is not fun.. Sort of extreme, but you never know how much PSI some folks may be running..
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The only air I have used to blow dust is a leaf blower. Not sure what the psi would be on that. It does the trick on getting grass or sawdust off me though.
wrote in message

by
Caution:
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----------- Sure beats rubbing yourself down with a tack cloth.....
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On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 02:23:49 +0100, "gandalf"

well, the jury's still out on that one... depends on who you can get to handle the tack cloth for you..
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I make tack cloths by putting a little varnish and water on a piece of folded cheesecloth. They keeps for years in a glass jar. Very tacky, very cheap! Dave
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I'd suggest that you spend a few bucks on a 3 pack of tack rags... not only will it do the job for you, but you'll see what they are and how they work.. IMHO, it's hard to duplicate or make something that you've never used... kind of asking someone to make brown paint when they've never seen brown before...
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There are some pretty thorough instructions at this site. YMMV.
http://www.klownhammer.org/tackcloth
Humbly submitted, O'Deen
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Hi Corey,
Well, maybe I'm too late.
My background; Did my first install and countertop in 1969. My first full kitchen and install during the Watergate trials. In the late '70's, Alan Park, then the president of Rudd paint put on his overalls and came into the finish booth with us for some advanced instruction. Been a Firefighter for many years but I have recently gone back to working in the cabinet shops. Have built most of the fine furniture in our home along with several guitars. I am currently spending many of my days off in the spray booth in a cabinet shop.
That's the background, here's the recommendation.
Tack cloths leave more than they pick up.
You didn't mention the type of finish but here are a few guidelines.
Use a high quality sandpaper. The new foil backed gold papers are very expensive but have a long life and are worth the price. Sand to 120# when staining, 400# to 600# when dyeing, but don't use carbide paper as the rounder particles will burnish rather than abrade. After applying the dye resand to 240# for surface finishes. Sand to at least 240# for Walnut. All veneered panels should be block sanded only, never with a power sander. Don't use oil based stains under surface finishes. Change your sandpaper very often...it's easy to polish and burnish and the staining will be blotchy.
Been planning on a finishing video but not a lot of time to do that. Even the pro's do some occasional stupid things when prepping to finish, and the video would help out in the shop I'm in.
Might be of more help if I knew the wood, stain, dye, and type of finish.
Hope this helped. -Rick
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