tablesaws

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Unisaw and Powermatic [unless Jet, the new owner of Powermatic, is changing that situation]. harrym

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If you have $$$ to burn, get anything but Griz. I would bet that you will be very happy with the Uni, PM, or Griz. MOST people won't be able to tell the difference IF there is one. IMHO, all tablesaws probably come from different corners of the same building anyway :-) I've turned out some nice product out of my griz, the same as others have turned out fine product from theirs. Probably a Ford Vs. Chevy kind of thing. I have found that it isn't the tablesaw that limits my ability to make a good product, but my learning curve. For the price of a Unisaw or PM, you can get a great Griz & maybe have enough left over for that bandsaw and/or a small jointer.

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Don't you mean Woodtek here, not Griz? Woodtek is the brand distributed by Woodworkers Supply Inc. Have never seen one, but I do buy frequently from the company. harrym

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: hey everybody i am going to be in the market for a new tablesaw in a : couple of months. it is either going to be a delta unisaw or woodtek. : i have heard plenty of things about delta but nothing of : woodtek.anybody out there with a woodtek.
Get the Jet cabinet saw, which is a terrific machine and priced enough below the Delta to pay for a really good couple of blades.
    -- Andy Barss
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or the 15 roller outfeed table, or mobile base
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On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 01:18:16 +0000, Andrew Barss wrote:

Well, let's see here. On Amazon, a 3HP left-tilt Unisaw with 50" Biesmeyer fence goes for $1595. For that you can get:
Grizzly 1023L 3HP left-tilt w Biesmeyer clone fence: $895 Griz Bies clone rail extensions (to match the unisaw fence): $149 Griz 1182HW "low-end" 6" jointer: $325 Forrest WW II blade: $100
Flowers for when SWMBO sees the checkbook: $30 Dinner for after SWMBO sees the checkbook: $50
And still have $50 left over to start buying wood with.
--
Joe Wells

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On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 10:21:46 -0500, V.E. Dorn wrote:

I figured that shipping, taxes, etc. would be a wash. I guess the Griz combo would be more to ship because of the jointer, but then I live close enough to their Springfield, MO store to just pick it up. ;^)
-- Joe Wells
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Normally it would be a wash...but IIRC Amazon often offers free shipping.

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But considering a wash, your points were all clearly valid even if the wife only gets fine furniture vs. roses and dinner. ;~)

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wrote:

Many saws are available in left tilt. This is not feature unique to the PM66 .
Barry
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"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote

Yes you are correct. I was pointing that out because the Unisaw tilts to the right. With that information "russ" could make a more informed decision on what I think are the top 2 saws readily available. Then he could decide between the more common and easier to find accessories for Unisaw and the safer (only in the mode of cutting between tilted blade and fence ) PM66.
Just MHO. Just trying to help. :-)
Dan
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----- Original Message -----
Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Sent: Friday, July 18, 2003 7:27 AM Subject: Re: tablesaws

Most extended fences are to the right of the saw blade. Try cutting a 40" X 40" square with one edge against the fence and the other edge under your saw blade. It doesn't take much imagination to figure out the possible results.
Not misinformation! Dan
Sorry for sending reply directly to you Mike. I hit the wrong button.
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"Bob G. " <wrote
there is NO SAFETY issue between the two... in 99 point 9 percent of the cuts
I said something like that
moving the fence to the left of the blade on a right tilt saw is NOT a big deal...
Mike said that
Dan trying not to get misquoted
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[snip]

Are you saying that cutting from the right of the blade w/ a right-tilt TS is a manageable safety situation -- i.e., it can be done w/ relative safety?
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One fallacy with your explanation. If you are cutting bevels on both sides of a panel that is larger than the left side rip capacity of your right tilt saw, you end up cutting the bevel with the fence on the right side of the saw.
That said, the advantages IMHO of a left tilt far out weigh those of those of a right tilt especially when cutting bevels on both sides of a board or panel, narrow or wide. You dont have to worry about the first bevel cut sliding under the fence then cutting the second parallel bevel cut on a left tilt saw if you leave the same side down or up.
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Well, I suppose if you make a lot of large panels with beveled edges, then maybe a left-tilt will be better for you. How many people actually do this? Seriously, I'm curious, because I never have and can't really forsee needing to either.
What I do a lot of, however, is to use stacked dado blades. Not having to worry about adjusting my measurements due to the addition of a stacked blade when referencing the fence scale is of much more utility to me than being able to cut the one bevel in 5 years that I might need to cut. I cut dadoes or rabbets tens of times on almost every project. And the whole deal about access to the motor is valid, but that really isn't an issue either, since I only get in there maybe 2x per year. The only really good thing about a left-tilt is that you have more shelf space under the right-side table.
Mike

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I hope you are correct as I just placed an order on a right tilt, thinking that many items in the long list of reasons for a left tilt are either overstated or are un-important to me.
-Jack

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I think you'll be thrilled with it, Jack.
As I said before, the only really good reason to get a left-tilt is if you plan to do a lot of large panel beveling. I honestly don't think this will describe very many woodworkers, but, as always, I wouldn't be surprised to find out I'm wrong. But, if you asked yourself the question "which features are more important to me?", then you should be very happy with your choice. That's what I did and a right-tilt was the clear choice. I'm extremely happy I bought it.
Mike

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Mike in Mystic wrote:

Mike,
I had a right-tilt 9" Rockwell many years ago, something never felt right with it even though for what I was asking it did just fine, I gave it to my dad about 20 years ago and it's still running. Since then every saw I've purchased (3), including my jobsite saw, has been a left-tilt. This deal about having to deal with a dado blade is a wash, it's a piece of cake to handle and shouldn't be blown out of proportion. Personally, I like to know that I can make all of the cuts I want with my fence on the right of the blade. A left-hander might feel differently..and that is when I, if I was in that situation, would make the decision to reverse the mounting of the fence to get the same features.
JMHO, Scott
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LOL... well too late now.. I'm sure you will be happy with it and be able to work around any thing that may come up. In a professional setting the differences may nag at you when you are on the saw for many hours a week and were used to the opposite tilt.
BTY, you have seen the long list of reasons to get the left over the right and I agreed most are strictly personal preference but when you compared the long list of reasons to get the left tilt vs. the reasons to the right tilt, what reason on the right tilt list swayed you to choose the right tilt? I don't know if you have seen my "rubber stamp" answer to choosing one over the other but it gives you the little things to think about if you cannot decide which way to go and I may add your reasons to the right tilt reasoning.
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