tablesaw switch questions

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Well, my vintage 1938 unisaw seems to want to keep running now that it's started being used again. It simply won't shut off.
First time it happened, I flipped the switch to off, and the saw kept running, but I immediately flipped it to on then off again and it stopped. Thus, I thought maybe I imagined the whole thing.
Happened a couple more times and then, last night, it simply stayed on. Had to unplug it. Plug it in, and it's off and running. Unplug it to stop. Whilst I'm gluing up the cabinet, I hear a <click> from the direction of the saw (~4' behind me) but it's only noted in passing. But, when I next use the saw (say 10 minutes later), voila, it turns off via the switch!
Anyhow, I guess it's time for a new switch, non? I took the cover off and there was nothing notable that would seemingly interfere w/it's operation.
What was the click?
I'm thinking of simply running out to the nearest electrical supply place (no, not home depot) and getting a replacement. Any reason not to go this route vs the fancy, expensive one from Delta?
Thanx Renata
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wrote:

Voltage?
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On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 08:27:47 -0600, Frank Boettcher

220V
R
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Renata wrote:

The fancy one from Delta is magnetic. It requires electric power to stay in the "on" position. If the power goes off, or you trip a breaker while it's on, it won't re-start accidentally when the power is restored, even if you forget to turn it off.
The click you heard was probably the switch releasing itself to the off position after it got tired of having fun with you.
An electrical supply house should be able to fix you up with an appropriate switch without going to Delta. Take the information with you from the motor identification plate (voltage, starting amps, running amps, etc.).
DonkeyHody "We can't all be heroes, because someone has to sit on the curb and clap as they go by." - Will Rogers
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wrote:

I am unwilling to take a part my 1948 Unisaw switch, but I would think that the contacts in the switch itself maybe sticking, it maybe due to connection resistance causing heating and swelling, or dust clogging mechanicals. As to what is the best replacement for the old style switch with bullet motor, that will be information I need to file away for future use. Hopefully someone will be along shortly.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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One of the maintenance procedures is to exercise switches every few months or once a year to prevent it from sticking. Use it or loose it philosophy. Sounds like its just sticking and needed to be cleaned and lubed.
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Mark...
I also have a 1948 Unisaw which has been fully restored and upgraded although it still has the original bullet motor (runs like a champ). I've added the Biesmeyer, table extension, and a few months agao, I decided to retire the (working) OEM switch and I installed a Craftsman large paddle safety switch over on the left. I think I paid $50 for it from Sears parts... whatever. What I did was rewire it with a longer power in cable, and after removing the old switch, simply connected the switch-out cable inside the old Unisaw box. I then made an .080" aluminum plate to match the rounded-corner box and covered up the connection. I'm sure you could get by with a less-expensive switch, but after a few months of actually using the paddle switch... I love it. Its a a big improvement over having to hunt for the OEM switch if you've got 5" of Biesmeyer steel extending the profile of the saw.
And no... I'd never consider selling the OEM Delta switch, switchplate, or dust door. All carefully stored away.
Mike
On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 08:31:17 -0600, Markem

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You may want to look into a "new" type of switch that is safer. The newer designs are easier to hit in an "emergence"
Renata wrote:

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Renata wrote:

Not just a switch, but a proper no-volts-release motor starter.
Also add yourself a knee-paddle off switch.
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Renata wrote:

You're going to need lots of wood! <G>
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I had a very cheap plastic rocker switch get filled w/ sawdust. The sawdust physically prevented the conductor inside form moving to engage/disengage the alternate position on and off the electrical conductor points. I had to flip it on/off like craxzy, and it may or may not have done anything. After a while it burned the conductors away by flipping it. It was dangerous as far as there was no way to tell when or how it would recieve power. I do not know the schematics, or if there was any other serious electrical hazard.
-
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I was actually able to take it all apart (outer housing/wires//switch/rocker conductor/gasket) to the basics, while the housing was still on the saw. Cleaned it up, and re-assembled with e- tape everywhere. I could re-use it only b/c it was a 110/220 and had duplicate rocker conductor spring bridges to the points, though one was fried, it still had spring function for the click rocker action. Just moved the outer wires from 0-110V to the 111-220V side. |_ to _|
if yours is different, magnetic, I know nothing. Be thinking of price, and if it is expensive, you may have options.
-
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it is common for switches to be plugged with sawdust, and can be aggravated when the sawdust is wet. The tiniest holes allow it in. It is like cleaning out a shaver of whiskers.
-
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with mine, it had to be taken apart, all the air for all the time in the world wouldn't work; elbow grease and a fine paint brush.
-
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Renata wrote:
> > I'm thinking of simply running out to the nearest electrical supply > place (no, not home depot) and getting a replacement. Any reason not > to go this route vs the fancy, expensive one from Delta?
Good game plan.
Look for the Allen-Bradley distributor in your area.
They tend to serve the industrial rather than the contractor segment of the electrical market.
Doubt you will find an exact replacement due to age, but you should be able to get a functional replacement with no problem.
Lew
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If you'd be so kind as to lend a wee bit further assitance...
Got an Allen-Bradley 600 Type 1General Purpose enclosed switch. Here's what the box says: 1HP 277VAC 1PH max 3/4 HP 230VDC MAX 2 Pole
Should I read that as appropriate for 1HP for AC and 3/4HP DC?
Is this the switch correct? The counter guy seemed a little lost (and it wasn't even a HD!); think he was new.
Is there a better option?
Thanx Renata
On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 20:35:38 GMT, Lew Hodgett

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Renata wrote:
> If you'd be so kind as to lend a wee bit further assitance... > > Got an Allen-Bradley 600 Type 1General Purpose enclosed switch. > Here's what the box says: > > 1HP > 277VAC 1PH max > 3/4 HP > 230VDC MAX > 2 Pole > > Should I read that as appropriate for 1HP for AC and 3/4HP DC?
Yes.
> Is this the switch correct?
> The counter guy seemed a little lost (and > it wasn't even a HD!); think he was new.
It should do the job; however, it sounds like you have a unit that comes with it's own NEMA 1 enclosure.
You should be able to get an "open" version (no enclosure) that will mount in the existing opening on the T/S.
Probably save you a few $.
Have fun.
It's the holiday week, about the only people working are the rookies.
BTW, they put every rookie on the counter to start, then ask them to take care of the good looking women who walk in asking, "Can you help me?"<G>
If they survive, they're off probation.
Lew
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Renata wrote:

No reason you need a delta switch. Probably better off with a good magnetic motor starter anyway. Much better than that old toggle switch.
Just curious though, since Delta only began selling The Unisaw in 1939, how did you get one from 1938.
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On 27 Dec 2006 18:16:31 -0800, "A.M. Wood"

-snip-
That's my little secret and if I tell you I have to...
I assumed (silly me) that since the serial number starts with "38-..." it meant 1938 plus the production run #. Guess I'll have to look it up, maybe on OWWM.
Renata
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wrote:

That would be 1945 model from OWWM serial number list.
Mark (sixoneeight) = 618
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