Tablesaw Sled Hold Down Clamps?

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I want to finally build a sled for ripping waney-edged boards on my tablesaw, and am thinking of using this style of hold down (seems more easily adjustable than the toggle clamps I had planned to use):
Two versions from Rockler:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !387&filter=t%2Dtrack%20hold%20down%2021912 and http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page "010&filter=t%2Dtrack%20hold%20down (second one has rubber tips, and is more like Woodpecker's).
And Woodpecker's version: http://www.carbideprocessors.com/products/Woodpeckers-HDCG%252dPIV-%252d-Hold-Down-Clamps -(Each).html Anyone have reviews/recommendations?
-- Andy Barss
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On 6/12/11 12:45 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !387&filter=t%2Dtrack%20hold%20down%2021912
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/products/Woodpeckers-HDCG%252dPIV-%252d-Hold-Down-Clamps -(Each).html
When you say "toggle" are you talking about these? http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !272 http://www.rockler.com/c/specialty-woodworking-clamps.cfm
I prefer these because they seem to hold better and with less pressure. You will see the newer ones have a knob instead of nut for adjustability and I find it nearly as fast as the metal hold downs.
If you decide on the metal hold downs, go with the Rocklers that have the thicker rubber pads. Bare metal with mar and dent many woods and the thinner rubber with wear off.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Personally these have worked fine for me <http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=toggle+clamp>.
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I've replaced the hex nuts on mine with wing nuts for the same reason. Not as slick looking as the knobs, but does the trick.
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On 6/12/11 7:17 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Yeah, I used knobs simply because I had a bunch of them.
--

-MIKE-

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On 6/12/2011 12:45 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !387&filter=t%2Dtrack%20hold%20down%2021912
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/products/Woodpeckers-HDCG%252dPIV-%252d-Hold-Down-Clamps -(Each).html
Been there, done it. I used the toggle lever clamps and they do need adjustments. I went cheap and screwed them to small square blocks and screwed those blocks down to the sled where needed. IIRC I only used a pair.
The clamps you are thinking about using Look to probably be a better solution however because none of the clamps actually have a far reach they will need to be repositioned closer/farther from the sled's cutting edge. Wider boards need the clamps farther from the cutting edge and narrower need to be closer.
I would suggest at least 2 rows of t-tracks to allow you more flexibility. I used the square blocks and moved them around on the sled because of that situation
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Those things are a pain in the neck. I got a pair about 8-10 years ago. I don't use them any more. I find the toggle clamps much easier.

I recommend toggle clamps. :-)
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:>Anyone have reviews/recommendations?
: I recommend toggle clamps. :-)
Do you have them mounted so they can adjust for different width boards? That was the appeal of the other type, mounting them to T-track.
-- Andy Barss
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On 6/12/11 8:03 PM, Andrew Barss wrote:

I have mine on a scrap piece of melamine. I use two screws per clamp and move it around wherever I want. This takes, possibly, twice as long as sliding along the T-track, which the added advantage of being able to use any straight scrap I have sitting around the shop.
Sometimes we try to make rocket science out of this stuff. I think it was Larry who said he uses some scrap and drywall screws... accomplishes the same thing, for virtually free. As soon as some woodworking catalog comes out with a new jig, it's like we forget how we ever got along without it.
I know a lot of woodworkers who used pocket holes for years before Kreg was around. One in particular, bought a couple Kreg jigs and found they slowed him down, so he sold them to some newbie who couldn't live without them. He does, however, use the step drill bits.
--

-MIKE-

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On Sun, 12 Jun 2011 20:28:48 -0500, -MIKE- wrote:

It's also possible to mount toggle clamps on t-bolts so they can slide in t-tracks.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 6/13/11 11:29 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 73
--

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"Andrew Barss" wrote:

----------------------------------- T-track works for me.
A 12" x 72" x 3/4" plywood piece with 3, 12", T-tracks evenly spaced on 24" centers and a 3/8" x 3/4" x 72" aluminium bar for a guide runner and you are good to go.
Lew .
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On 6/12/2011 9:30 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Lew does that work on 8' long boards also. I usde an 8' sled and use the rip fence as the guide.
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On 6/13/11 7:03 AM, Leon wrote:

I was thinking about this and realized that I have straighten the edge of shorter crooked boards by simply holding it against another straight-edged board which is against the fence, and pushing both forward, together. I wouldn't do that with a longer board.
But that made me wonder if you don't really need clamps on this type of sled. I bet a router mat (a good one, not the stuff they use as shelf liners) would provide plenty of stability. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 696
ps: I don't use Rockler for examples because I am endorsing them in any way. I use them because they have short urls. :-)
--

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"Leon" wrote:

-----------------------------
------------------------------------- Depends.
If you center the 72" sled on an 8 ft board you eng up with 12" of board unsupported which is not swift.
Most of the hardwood boards I've needed for furniture type work have typically been 54" or less.
Never tried an 8' board.
Lew
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On 6/13/2011 4:32 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

So your technique is to cut the stock close to needed lengths before straightening.. I have often considered doing it that way, if I end up with 12' long boards I will often experiment with Cut List Plus and tell it that I have 2, 6 footers or a 4 footer and an 8 footer to see how that works out. Those shorter pieces are considerably easier to handle but some times there will be more waste.
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"Leon" wrote:

-------------------------------------- Last year, took a wood working course at Cerritos College here in SoCal.
(Great program BTW).
I was taught to cross cut rough stock to length + waste allowances as the first step in stock preparation.
This was after you first cut off end cracks, checks, etc.
It was the only cut you were allowed to make using a radial arm saw.
After cutting to length it was face jointing time to get flat enough to run thru the planer. (At least 35% of total area)
(Oh the joys of having access to a 12" jointer).
Using a sled instead of a jointer does a good job as long as you don't have to salvage twisted stock.
Lew
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On 6/13/2011 9:28 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Snip
Agreed, we don't have a great supply of rough cut lumber available to us in the Houston area unless you want to take a couple hour drive. Closer places tend to be more expensive and the savings of rough cut over s2s is not significant most of the time. So, I typically will purchase s2s that is normally pretty flat. In some instances s4s can be more economical when time is a factor and you use most of the board. s2s typically has more wast material left over.
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On Sun, 12 Jun 2011 17:45:46 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss

I have used both types, and each has it's place. If the geometry of the jig allows toggle clamps, they are usually much faster to work with. Less so if have have to often adjust for material thickness.
But I think a jig for waney edge boards may benefit from the adjustibility of the t-track hold-down. The rubber tips may be a good feature, if they won't slip off.
By the way, I snap a chalkline and use my bandsaw for my first rip of a waney-edged board.

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I must be primitive. I just use a couple scraps of wood and some drywall screws and run them right in to the sled.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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