Tablesaw Safety question!

I have a Shop Fox 3hp cabinet saw equipped with an Osborne EB3 miter gauge with a stop for repetitive cutting. The blade is aligned dead on parallel to the miter slot using a calibration plate and dial indicator for reference. When using the miter guage I am advancing the miter gauge and work piece until it is cut. After the cut is completed, I retract the workpiece with miter gauge towards me, I don't pass the board past the rear of the blade and then turn off the saw. I feel kind of unsafe doing it this way because I do have a trapped piece of wood risking a huge kickback. I see Norm do it the way I described every week. I would like to have some opinions on this, how do you guys do it? What is the normal method of crosscutting with a miter gauge? Incidently, there is no play in the slot on the miter guage, Zero! TIA.......
Gene
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EugeneC173 wrote:

When I'm not using the stop I'll retract the miter gauge after slightly moving the stock away from the blade. If I'm using a stop the the stock is removed off the back of the saw or the saw is shut off with the blade stopped before I retract the miter gauge.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Ditto Nova
Jim

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I don't own a table saw, so take this for what it's worth... My understanding of kickback is that it's caused when a piece of stock, caught between the blade and fence, begins to rotate into the blade. Because the fence won't move, the stock gets pinched and the blade hurls the piece forward with great force. If the stock can't rotate into the blade, then the kickback won't occur. In the case of the miter guage with stop, you are holding the workpiece to the guage, so it can't rotate into the blade. Personally, I would not be concerned about drawing the stock back. Bruce

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Good technique suggests not drawing the workpiece back along the spinning blade, ever. You can get a kickback from cut-offs, too, even without the fence there. DAMHIKT. Tom >Subject: Re: Tablesaw Safety question!

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Bruce,
You make a very good point, the stock really can't rotate into the blade with the miter gauge behind it. Any other opinions on this?
Gene
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True. One wrong move though and OUCH the nice clean cut edge could have a big nick or so could your head.
Cutting a 1" wide piece, maybe I'll bring it back, cutting a 10" wide piece, no, I'm not going to and in fact cannot because my pawls prevent it. I'd still not do it anyway once past the blade that far. Ed
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EugeneC173 wrote:

The problem is, because you are retracting the miter gauge, it's in front of the stock due to the direction of travel. The stock can easily rotate off the gauge.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Jack,
Your method would be the absolute safest method. Thanks for your input.....
Gene
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I take advantage of a bit of play in the slot, cutting with pressure right, drawing back with pressure left. If I forget, no great sweat, as the edges of the teeth are the only possible point of contact, and they are pushing the piece into the table.
Greater danger lies in reaching to clear the cutoff.

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On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 07:31:53 -0500, "George"

Yeah. It is tempting to take away the cutoff piece. Norm gave me the willies a couple times remove the cut-off piece with his fingers. I either turn off the saw and "freeze" until the blade stops or slide the cutoff away from the blade using one of my narrow pushsticks. I keep 3 or 4 different pushsticks on my Beisemeyer fence, wher ethey are easy to use and convenient. Safety has a lot to do with working without being in a rush.
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Phisherman wrote:

The author of one of the table saw books I read uses blasts of compressed air to clear cutoffs. It is especially handy when using a pattern jig that covers the right side of the blade.
-- Mark
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On 12 Nov 2003 02:24:50 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (EugeneC173) wrote:

Not sure wha tyou are saying. "Trapped piece" is a clue that you are sliding the piece with your miter gauge with the piece sliding against the fence while passing it through the blade. That's situation should be avoided by clamping an alignment board against the fence such that the piece leaves that alignment board before the piece reaches the saw blade. Small pieces can vibrate toward the back of the blade and fly off in any sirection too. I read that a table saw blade runs at 100 MPH.
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Yeah, that's about right. On a 10-inch blade running at 3000 RPM, the tip speed works out to slightly over 89 MPH.
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No, the piece is trapped between the stop on the fence and the blade. The fence isn't in the picture.
Gene
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