tablesaw outfeed

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jean forand wrote:

Rollers, if they aren't perpendicular to the saw blade, can be down right dangerous as they will pull the stock away or towards the blade (dependant upon their alignment to the blade).
If you insist on having something that rolls look at ball casters. These can/will be expensive depending on how many you feel you need.
Having said that, neither is necessary and both are a waste of money. All you really need is a surface at the back side of your table so the stock doesn't want to come up and meet your chin once it's gone past the blade. Also, the rollers/casters render the outfeed useless as a work surface should you choose to need them as "extra" work surface for the shop.
UA100
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wrote:

I made my own of MDF and plastic laminate. I prefer a solid outfeed vs. rollers because I can use it as an addition assembly surface when needed. If you don't like MDF, use birch ply under the laminate.
For my dollar, MDF is great stuff for outfeeds, infeeds, assembly tables, router table tops, shop cabinets, etc... Just because it's cheap dosen't mean it's not usable.
Barry
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My "working bench" in the shop is 4'x3' on wheels, built to be 5/8" below the table saw height. When I need outfeed, I wheel it behing the saw and top it with a piece of plywood. I guess I could incorporate a roller into it but have never seen the need.
in message

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===============I have nothing against either Laminate or MDF...except neither look like wood... and my shop is a woodshop...
My outfeed table (15 years old now) is Birch plywood... with a finish of poly....trimed with scrap Cherry ...looks great...functions great...and has lasted all these years ...
IT just looks like it belongs in a Woodshop ....
Bob Griffiths
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December 03 issue of Fine WoodWorking has plans for a shop made roller, along with a review of 5 or 6 different models.
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www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
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The HTC rollers work fine in my experience. But remember that they are designed as a space saver and as such have limitations. One improvement I would make is to add support at either outboard side. With the single center support they tend to be tippy especially with large sheet goods. You could add an auxiliary roller stand if needed or simply prop up the corner with a stick. The rollers are parallel and I have not noticed that they skew your work one way or the other.
However if you have the room make yourself a permanent outfeed table as others have suggested. It's easy and cheap and much better. I prefer a laminate surface.
Mike
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I just got the Jet contractor saw with cast wings. After the delta benchtop it's like going from a yugo to a Trailblazer. Anyway what's the best way to make the miter slots in the outfeed table so they align up with the saws slots?
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Mike S.
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net
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make a straight true stick that fits snugly in the miter slot, long enough to fill the miter slot and extend as far as you want the slot in the outfeed table to go. you might need to cut relief in the bottom of it to get it close enough to the outfeed table at the extreme end. with that stick in place, set a couple of sheets of something- plywood or mdf or whatever- up against it and clamp them down. pull the stick out of the middle and use the resulting gap as a guide for a top bearing router bit.     Bridger
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Bridger wrote:

I made a similar jig but the 3/4" piece was 1 1/8" high and set into the slot only at the table. This was then sided up with two pieces which were then bis-qwiked into the piece sitting in the slot. This left me with the 3/4" "open" which was then routed with a pattern (bearing on bottom/'tween the cutter and base) bit.
Two slight problems to watch for.
When slotting, be sure you stop away from the cast iron. Don't Ask Me How I Know This. The tit that's left isn't much to take off with a file or 60X backed up by a hard block.
Next, I'm not sure if the table moved or I got some seasonal fluctuations but about six months later the outfeed slot was off by enough that a sled runner would run in it. It was only a matter of re-installing the jig and shaving off the now offending "extra".
Which brings me to this. Just how long should you save a one off jig?
It is semi-impressive to have a 3/4" (OK, make that 3/4" heavy in my case) slot when you are done and not one of those 1" wide slots you normally see.
UA100, whose 3/4" heavy isn't detectable by the neked eye...
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wrote:

see, that's why my jig is better than yours. ; ^ ) when I was done I simply returned the parts to stock. no one off jig to store.
that said, I do have a number of "one off" jigs that have been in use, modified and yes, stored for years.....     Bridger, whose 4x8 outfeed/assembly table has a heap of old jigs under it.....
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Mike S. wrote...

Keeter and Bridger made their extension table slots match the tablesaw slots... Got a question for you guys. Why make it fit? Is it a testosterone thing? (G)
Mine are slightly oversize (Ar-ar-ar!) but the technique was sort of similar to Bridger's. I butted the outfeed table up to the tablesaw, marked the slot outline, moved the outfeed away from the tablesaw (forgot this step, eh, Keith?), clamped a pair of scrap fences a tad more than 3- 1/4" away from each pencil mark and routed the slot. The 3 1/4" is because I used a 1/2" straight bit and my router baseplate is 7". The sled runners do their guiding in the tablesaw slots; the slots in the outfeed table are just for clearance.
Cheers!
Jim
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Jim Wilson wrote:

That and a generous dosing of pride. I mean, any hack can make 1" wide slots.
http://www.newyankee.com/tour2.shtml
There you have it.
UA100
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Heyyyy... what if your slots are 1" ????
Like this one:
http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-639331.html
Unisaw A100 wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote...

http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-639331.html
That yours, Pat? Looks like a unisaur under there. Mine (34-450, Nov '68) only has 3/4" slots....
Jim, feeling decidedly undersized now (G)
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http://home.att.net/~mboceanside/wsb/html/view.cgi-photo.html--SiteID-639331.html

Oh no, that there is a 12/14 that Pat, umm, "lucked" onto.
Go ahead, sharpen the goad and ask him what he paid for it.

I've got a pitcher of my Unisaw with O'Deen in the background and he makes it look like a CompacTool key chain table saw (similar to a Ryobi table saw for anyone not interested in bad vintage machines).
UA100
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Unisaw A100 wrote...

Aw, man! I don't want to know.

I bet! That one shot of Paddy with a -- what was it, a #7? -- made it look like a #1.
Jim
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wrote:

it was an 8, IIRC.     Bridger
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Jim Wilson wrote:

The great "Chucklehead" shot? That was a No. 8.
A'yup, him a big boy and I heard he's still growing.
UA100
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Unisaw A100 wrote...

The missus says that about me from time to time. "Yeah, he's still a growing boy!" Only problem is where she points when she says it...
Jim
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The 34-350(The saw that the Unisaw wanted to be) is the bigger boy in the family. It was built in 04/66 in Tupelo.
The average Unisaw comes in at a dainty 380 lbs, while the 12-14" comes in at 830 lbs. The 12-14 has a cast iron table that is 38"x48". The miter guage comes in at 15lbs. The motor is a standard 3hp single phase and it hits the scales at 120lbs.
The saw was purchased at auction last January for $165.
It ran the day I plugged it in with no additional work.
Any questions ???
Jim Wilson wrote:

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