tablesaw outfeed

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Ok I want to buy an outfeed table/rollers for my unisaw. I have seen both the delta table and the HTC rollers. Are their others
HTC roller are not all parallel to each other. Some or up to 1/8 higher or lower to the one infront
Delta table is made of cheap MDF and Angle iron So which do you recommend?
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here's some links to pictures of what I did:
http://pages.cthome.net/logmanworld/outfeed1.jpg
http://pages.cthome.net/logmanworld/outfeed4.jpg
http://pages.cthome.net/logmanworld/outfeed5.jpg
I used ideas from Al Amaral (http://members.aol.com/Alamaral/Outfeed.html ) and Jim Becker (http://www.sawsndust.com/p-outfeed.htm ).
I think you can make a better one than you can buy (not to say that mine is an example of this), and it will certainly be cheaper. I've been using mine for about 9 months and it has been indispensible.
Mike

the
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I pretty much used Al's and Delta's factory outfeed table for ideas on my own too. I used 4'x4' piece of 3/4" melamine, a piece of piano hinge and a couple pieces of 1/8"x1" angle iron for support, and a couple of 1" square tube for legs. Greg
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Dude - make your own.
It just kills me when ppl ask - which (insert whatever here) should I buy?? When you can make your own to fit you need for cheaper in 99% of the cases.
I mean what do you plan on building w/ the tools anyways? If you cant build an outfeed table - or a router table - or a drill press table - or what ever - why would think that you can build a piece of furniture or whatnot?
Use your skills at those items first - and like Tom Platman says (and I think of this almost anytime I build anything now after seeing his website) learn to think - once you know how to do that - you can build anything.
-R

the
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I don't mean to gloat, but I have a retired hospital gurney to which I added a plywood top covered with laminate. I can crank it up and down, thus matching the table saw top. It normally sits behind the saw, but if I need a really long outfeed table, I turn it long ways. It also serves well as an assembly table!
Cheers, Rich

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That's a really good idea. I'm always on the lookout for adjustable height devices and a gurney sounds ideal.

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On 7 Dec 2003 05:58:01 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@iximd.com (Richard) wrote:

Sounds perfect, and very versatile.
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Rob V wrote:

I agree..here you sit with a Uni and you're too damn lazy to build your own OF table for it. Hell, I built one for my lowly 64A and even documented it for anyone else that might need the info. Not too sure that I'd be asking you to make something for me if you can't even do this.
Scott
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"jean forand" wrote ...

Buy a sheet of 3/4 inch MDF and a couple 2x4's and make your own. You can even get creative and add a couple hinges so it folds down. Search Google for folding outfeed and you should get some examples of others who have done exactly that.
I used some leftover MDF and a couple of 2x4's and mine has been in service for 8 years. I wouldn't spend a lot of money on one and those rollers aren't all they are cracked up to be. I would rather have a solid surface.
--
Cheers,
Howard
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On Sat, 6 Dec 2003 21:55:55 -0800, "Howard Ruttan"

I've been using a Record adjustable roller stand. The rollers are better than nothing at all, but I need to build an outfeed table for my PM66. I like the hinge, 2x4's, and MDF idea. I'd like to hear what others have done, and what they would have done different. I need a design that keeps the DC port easily accessible.
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I have a PM66 saw and popped for the HTC outfeed table for it with the rollers. Being by myself it would be impossible for me to rip a 4x8 sheet of anything withoutand outfeed table but I hate it. Their design is lousy. It folds down nice enough to keep it out of the way when not in use and it was easy to fasten to the saw but it is not sturdy enough to keep from tilting ever so slightly and that causes the rollers to pull the sheet goods away from the fence as it rolls ahead. The rollers make it easy to move the sheet over the saw but the sheet then has a mind of its own and fights you off as it attempts to pull away from the fence because the rollers are functionally crooked when the table tilts. I can loosen the mounting and align it but it won't stay in alignment and only if perfectly aligned will it work right. Rollers are simply the wrong thing for the job.. If you do mainly sheet goods and want something slicker than flat table, consider using a matrix of swivle balls so that there is no ability for them to pull the sheet goods in any direction. I keep telling myself I am going to rectify this problem one of these days but usually I just fight it and make do. What I really need to do is take the HTC roller table and see how well it would float in the nearest river.

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rollers are fussy.they must be perfectly square to the blade or they will pull the material in whatever directionthey are skewed in. table are much better. I just installed a new beismier fence system to my unisaw and built a side extention table for it. I used corian cause i had some. if i can get some more when i do the outfeed table i will use it for that too. skeez
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Howard Ruttan wrote...

I second.

IME, the rollers tend to pull the stock laterally, which can be a bear to deal with. The ball roller types are better in that regard, but they mark up soft stock and have gaps which introduces a new problem. A flat, smooth surface is much better.
The only thing I'd add to Howard's suggestion is to do something to reduce friction on the outfeed surface. You can shellac and wax MDF for a cheap but effective solution. Melamine is another option, but it will also need to be waxed eventually; how soon/often depends on the woods you work with and how good your dust collection is. Best solution IMO is MDF+laminate. In this case, make sure to provide a good flat substructure, or perhaps laminate both sides. Otherwise it will want to warp with changes in humidity.
Jim
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"Jim Wilson" wrote ...

I thought of that Jim, but I'll just add a further 2 cents worth. My side feed table is MDF with a laminate on top and I find it too damn slippery. I like a little friction as some plywoods are slippery enough on their own. I find it gives me a bit more control when cutting up a 4x8 sheet. I wax the hell out of the bottom of my crosscut and other sleds and I run them over the saw table before it dries. I think, although I have no substantive proof, a little wax gets transferred to the MDF but not enough to make it too slick.
--
Cheers,
Howard
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Jean, I have to go with the majority. . .build your own. Far more rewarding and cheaper. Pictures of mine can be found at: http://www.amiigas.com/outfeed/outfeed.htm
-- Ed. O. My woodworking projects at: http://www.amiigas.com Remove the NAIL from e-mail to reply
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"high tech leveler"? I like the high tech hinge myself! ;-)
BRuce
Ed. O. wrote:

--
---

BRuce


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On Sun, 07 Dec 2003 08:37:52 -0500, BRuce <BRuce> scribbled

Hey, I use the same high tech leveller, except I've got metal legs (on the outfeed table, Keith).
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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Ed, I noticed in the picture of your TS you have a splitter built in to the blade insert. Does that work well? It seems like a clever idea. I have a stock Unisaw and would like to do the same. I assume you made the insert yourself? Thanks, Mark
Ed. O. wrote:

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Mark, Yes, make all my own inserts and that is a built in splitter. A piece of angle aluminum will do the trick. Got the idea from Kelly Mehler when we visited his shop in Berea, KY. He showed us how to add a piece of hardwood same width as the slot. It works and I won't argue with a master. Ed
-- Ed. O. My woodworking projects at: http://www.amiigas.com Remove the NAIL from e-mail to reply
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wrote:

Yup, I agree. I have a workbench on the far side of my TS that's the same height. Everything slides off the TS and onto the bench and I've yet to find anything that I can't handle that way.
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