Tablesaw does not start.. have to upgrade power

Folks,
I just bought a Jet table saw and plugged in yesterday night. I tried to start but then the fuse went off. I know i have 110 v line, but do i need to increase amps?
any good suggestion on how to do that? I am thinking of hiring an electrician.
regards, D J
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Dunno... what does JET say the saw requires? And what do you have now? 120V, sure (not 110V, by the way), but how many amps? And what gauge is the wire in the existing circuit?

Without knowing the answers to the above questions, any suggestion (other than to hire an electrician) is premature.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Fuse in panel indicate an older house and perhaps some funny wiring modifications through the years. Unplug saw and make sure blade and motor spins freely. Find the shortest circuit run to the panel, remove all other loads from that circuit, connect directly to receptacle without an extension cord and restart the TS again.
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You also don't mention whether anything is on the same circuit (lights, air conditioner, etc). You haven't given enough information for anyone to help you.
To summarize some of the other posts: 1) Read the amp rating from the manual or plate on the motor, and post back. A model number at minimum, since Jet makes a few tablesaws. According to the manual for a Jet SuperSaw (model JWSS-10CS, http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com/Shop/index.cfm?navPage=4&iid `53088), it says that you're supposed to have a 30 amp 120V circuit if you're running 120. That's not a usual circuit. Makes me wonder why they bother saying it can run on 120V, if that's the case, since you'd still have to re-wire everything from the panel to the outlet, so you might as well just do a 240V circuit. Some of their other saws don't say how many amps, which would be frustrating. But the motor should have a plate on it, regardless. 2) Try the tablesaw without an extension cord, and try to make sure that no other things are on the same circuit 3) Do you have a fuse, or a circuit breaker? A fuse (to me) implies older wiring that may or may not be "up to snuff". If that's the case, good luck.
Clint

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Depends on what model saw you have. If it is the contractor model with 1 1/2 hp, you need a dedicated 20A line. It may run on a 15A if there is nothing else on that circuit, but there is going to be too much drain and you may not have full power and you may cause overloading. Can also cause motor overheating.
Best bet is to get an electrician to run a new line just for the saw. While you are at it, convert the saw to 220 for better starting.
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Hello Everyone,
Thank you so much for the answers this quick. Really appreciate it.
I took a look at the saw and that says 1.5 HP, 18 Amps, 120 V.
Next thing I wanted to check is the gauge of the wire to see if I can really run more current in the same line if required to. Any good suggestion on quickly checking the gauge? Sorry I am all new to electric, never done in past.
Last time when this happened, I had TS running on an extension and that was draining power very much. only one other bulb was running since it was night. Then I directly tried to the outlet and same result.
If required, probably running a separate line may not be a bad ideas, but that will be expensive to me, right? My Garage is detached and the line to garage goes underground at least about 100 feet. I have circuit breakers in the garage as well as the house.
Regards, D J
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

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You need a minimum of 12 gauge to run a 20A circuit. I've never seen a 15A that used more than 14G wire. Look at the sheathing on the wire and it may state the size.
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Well, 18A is too much for a 15A circuit, so I think you've found your problem.
But do you have a sub-panel in the garage? Sounds like it. So you may just be able to rewire in the garage, rather than having to rewire from the house. That would be much easier, obviously.
As far as checking the gauge goes, take the plug out (after shutting off power to it via the circuit breaker) and see if you can see a gauge on the wire attached. If the outer sheath has been stripped all the way back to where it enters in the box, you may not have much luck with that. If you can see the wires running out of the sub-panel in the garage (assuming you have one), you can check to see if any of them are < 14 gauge. I think you need 12 gauge to run a 20A circuit. But just checking at the panel or the plug may not be enough; you don't know if all the wires in between are the same gauge.
If I was you, I'd run a 240V circuit for the saw from the sub-panel in the garage, and call it done. Hire an electrician if you're not comfortable doing it yourself.
Clint

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D J wrote:

If your garage has a subpanel, you should be able to add a 20-amp circuit that will power ONLY the table saw. But if you are not familiar with house wiring, DO NOT attempt to do this yourself - get a licensed electrician to do it for you.
--Steve
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