Tablesaw Blade General Question

I'm getting ready to order the WWII from forrest. They recommend a dampener-stiffener on the oustide of the blade. Not sure if that's what I have or not, I have the washer type thing that came with the saw that goes on between the blade and the nut.
Does a dampener-stiffener really add that much to the cut? Any cons about using one? Is the purchase of one worth the money?
Thomas
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I don't recall needing one with a 1/8" kerf blade (or 1/8" thickness blade). ask Forrest. Also don't recall ever seeing anyone with a Forrest blade suggesting that you need one. That is, I understand, the purpose of a 1/8" thick blade. I DO recomend one with a thin kerf blade.
On Mon, 04 Aug 2003 16:09:39 -0400, Thomas Mitchell

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I scanned the archives and a few years ago the same subject came up, likely numerous times. Enough people recommended one that I spent the extra $24.00. Money wasted? Dunno yet.
Lawrence A. Ramsey wrote:

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Interesting. My review of the archives on the same topic a couple of weeks ago led me to the opposite conclusion so I passed on it. Forrest does recommend it even for the 1/8" blade, but then again, they sell them. At least you know this much, it couldn't hurt.
-Jack
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My review was very quick. Two threads from 1998. Enough people said it helped them that I went ahead and bought one. Might not have been 50% but the enough for me to realize it could help and certainly wouldn't hurt, unless I needed an extremely deep cut, which is almost never.
Thomas
JackD wrote:

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A dampener / stiffener is about 3-4" round and will go on both side of the blade. This helps to eliminate vibration due to roration. Used 'em on my WWII thin kerf - great add-on - improves accuracy.
Jim

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Nope - the stiffner is a "huge washer" about 3,4 or 5" in diameter.

The prevailing winds seem to dictate "Yes on Thin Kerf blades; No on 1/8" standard kerf". The only con I've encountered is that the large diameter causes it to peek up above the table when the blade is raised near full height. It will, in those situations, often interfere with the cut.
The last question is up to you. I don't think I'd buy one if I was buying a 1/8" kerf WWII.
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With a 1/8" kerf blade it would be a waste of money. I comes in handy with thin kerf blades but then it limits the depth of cut you can make... Another good reason to only get 1/8" kerf blades.
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LOL! Send me $129.95 and I'll ship you one. Light weight - practically invisible.
Jums
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Steve, I know you are kidding but do you remember back say 20 years ago when there was a lot being said about using water to cut wood with? They were trying it out in Oregon using ceramic tipped nozzles and extremely high water pressure. Claimed it would cut down on fire probl ems, was safer, cheaper (no blades to sharpen), and so forth. Wonder what ever happened to that idea and method? Sounds like it would be even more feasible today.
Also, I appreciate your views of the Makita grinding thing. I, personally, did not like it at all. I was sharpening chisels and plane irons and jointer/planer blades for over 20 full-time carpenters and cabinet makers so I was looking for an easier way to do it. I had a LOT of hope for that thing and it did not work out. I ended up using waterstones, Lee Valley jigs and a little gizmo that clamped onto the sides of the chisels. Still looking for a better way. I did buy the Delta $39 grinding station or whatever they call it from Lowe's. It looks as though it may have some potential since it is water cooled and slow.
On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 02:59:29 GMT, Steve Knight

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I would have to guess that if you were using water to cut wood, and obviously as you stated it would be under very high pressure, the wood would become water logged and unusable for woodworking.
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Actually, I don't believe that it did or was not reported, anyway. The water was only on it a few milliseconds. I think the problem was the hoses or maybe the pump. Still, it sounds like a most worthwhile tool if someone could make it work. The nice thing was, nails, stones, rocks, tires, barbed wire and so on was not a problem. There are no blades to sharpen. So, they can't be dulled by foreign objects.
On Thu, 07 Aug 2003 13:57:27 GMT, "Leon"

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O I push my saw on waht I cut. tropicals up to 3" thick and cutting on only one side of the blade cutting three different woods with two different grain directions and other wacky things. the wwII works great with no flex. since I started using 1/8" blades I really have not seen any blade flex on the tablesaw. i used to see it in the thinner blades though.
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