Table saw wired for 220 but using a standard 3 prong plug

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the magical blue smoke out, things no work anymore"
jc
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On Sat, 23 Feb 2008 04:25:05 -0800 (PST), fourempties

I bought a RAS from an estate where the owner had wired the motor for 220 but left the original 120 plug in place, then used a pigtail adapter to plug it in to a 220 outlet.
Once I got the machine home, I changed out the plug so there'd be no confusion.
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Chuck Taylor
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No sense of adventure, eh?
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I had a an old table saw that was wired for 110. It could be wired either way, but at that time I only had 110 in my shop. I had installed a quad outlet box on it. I took it to a jobsite and set it up. Was popping breakers when ripping 8/4 oak and asked the electrician to rewire it for 220, so he did and hardwired it to the temporary loop. He told me that the outlets on that quad box would all be 220, now, so don't use them. I didn't.
One morning, I came in and the drywall guys were already there putting up drywall. They all had these brand new Makita drywall guns and were raving about how fast a powerful they were. Thats when I noticed where they had them plugged in!
They were pissed when I told them that they were running on 220, but surprisingly it did not seem to damage them. They ran fine for the rest of the job and for the several after that. I am sure that their life expectancy had been reduced, but I have no idea by how much.
After they switched over to standard power, the bragging stopped.
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Robert Allison
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It implies that there must be a 120V _outlet_ that is wired for 220. It probably wouldn't hurt a 220V saw to be briefly connected to 110, but if a 110V tool was plugged into 220, watch out!
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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wrote:

Ok.. he COULD have a 220v circuit at home with a 110v plug.. Not that uncommon, I have a couple of 220v switched cords that have 115v plugs on them.. Most likely, though, he meant that it COULD run on 220v...
I have a Ridgid TS and it takes maybe 3 minutes to check, so I'd do the following before I plugged it in to anything:
Pull the screws off the motor started plate and look at the diagram on the housing, compared to how the motor is wired.. It's a LOT easier than you'd think, because the wire routing is very different for 220/110..
BTW: a lot of things say "prewired" 220v but you have to change them anyway..
mac
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I have it wired for 110 now, but I have another problem which I started another thread for. The post is called:
Ridgid table saw motor wiring
Any help would be seriously appreciated.
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