Table saw wired for 220 but using a standard 3 prong plug

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Just bought a Ridgid TS that the guy said is wired 220 but has a standard plug on it to use in a regular 110 outlet. He said it works fine this way and he used it all the time like this. Any thoughts? I have not turned it on yet.
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Did he say it *could* be wired for 220? most contractor saws can be wired either way by switching a couple of connections in the motor housing (usually detailed on or in the housing), but it involves changing the plug.
jc
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Nope- he said it IS wired for 220.
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Open up the motor and check the wiring diagram against what's connected.
It is possible (though inadvisable, certainly not code, possibly illegal in most jurisdictions) to run 220V through a 110V plug (there are enough conductors). I had a friend who's crimson-necked brother (a redneck amongst rednecks) did this because he didn't want to spend money on a new plug and a new outlet. But in his mind it was OK since a) he knew about it and b) he sprayed red paint on the outlet and the plug. A few years later his wife or kid plugged some non-220 item into the red outlet and it didn't go well.
hex -30-
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I suspect he erred. Unless he has some very non-standard wiring in his shop, you're not going to get 220 out of a 110 outlet, regardless of plug type, motor wiring, etc. If he has non-standard wiring, then indeed he could have had 110V outlets (standard duplex outlets) wired up so that they delivered 220V - all it takes is to put the neutral on the other pole of a 220V breaker. In that case, he could indeed use a 110V plug/outlet combination for a 220V saw. That's the only way you could get 220V out of a standard 110V duplex though.
Plug the saw into a 110V outlet. If it comes right up to speed, it's wired for 110. If it does not, then it's wired for 220V. Or... take off the motor plate and inspect the wiring, comparing the internal connections to the wiring chart that is most likely right there.
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Joe wrote:

Changing the plug isn't technologically required--any plug that has two prongs can pass 220. But it is certainly advisable as is using 220v receptacles instead of 110 on 220v lines, even though the 110v receptacles will actually _work_ just fine as long as you don't plug any 110v equipment into them.
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it. I gotta stop doing that.
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Make certain yourself by looking at the wiring diagram for the motor before you plug it in.
He might well have been running it on 220 circuit with a 110 plug, although it is exceeding stupid/dumb/foolish to wire a 220 circuit so that it will take a 110 plug, so don't make the same mistake ... verify, verify.
Myself, don't think I would purchase a saw with firing it up ... if you've already paid for it, just hope it's not a ruse to put the blame on you for an already fried motor.
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"Swingman" wrote

That should, obviously, be "without" firing it up ...
(Can't be too damned careful in matters 'electrical' around here) :)

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Ah- but I didn't say I had not fired it up. It fired up in his garage, but I don't know what his electrical set-up is, and I don't know much about electricity anyway. I am just wondering what will happen if I plug it into a regular outlet and turn it on, or if I need to try and wire it for 110. Smoke? Fire? Running at half-speed? Fry a circuit? Trip the breaker? Nothing?
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"fourempties" wrote

Sorry, sure sounded that way ...

If the saw is wired for 220 and you plug it into a 110 circuit that is _properly_ wired, more than likely it just won't run at all and there should be no damage.
The other way around and you'll likely let all the smoke out.
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ROTFL I just had to picture of all these saws with a built in smoke canister just ready to blow in the event you hook it up wrong. Can the smoke be replaced or do you have to get a new canister? ;~)
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"Leon" wrote

It'd be toast at that point ... burnt toast! :)
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Unfortunately, it is _magic_ smoke that makes all power devices run.
Creating replacement magic smoke is generally beyond the capabilities of the typical mortal.
One usually needs to take the device in question to a practicing thaumaturge (one specializing in alchemy and transformations), whom, after sufficient groveling on your part, will consent to transform an inordinate amount of your money into the requisite magic smoke for the particular type of device and emplace same in the device.
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wrote:

;~) Having been in the automotive business for many years and having a close association with the Oldsmobile factory rep he could never explain a question I have had ever since I was 23 years old. I replaced the submerged, universal electric motor fuel pump on my car. Wondering how that little cylinder shaped pump worked I cut it opened and to my surprise found that the gasoline passes through the middle of the motor and keeps every thing inside perfectly clean including the brushes. Now I know that the brushes will not spark when they are submerged however there are times that you run out of gasoline and air is surely introduced into the mix. Why no big bang?
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wrote:

I worked as a Metrologist in a fuel pump test facility for one of the big US car companies for 10 years, so I might have the long sought answer to your question.
The somewhat simplified answer, without going into all kinds of details is:
When you run out of fuel there are still a lot of vapors in the tank. Fuel vapors are heavier than air and so they pool in the tank. That leaves an oxygen lean environment.
The chances of getting a combustable mixture into the fuel pump and then a hot enough spark from the brush at the that instance are extremely unlikely.
I suppose it is possible for that big bang to happen but probably only likely on a full moon, during the vernal equinox, South of the equator.
Then you'd have to put the magic smoke back in...
You are correct that the fuel provides lubrication and cooling for the pump motor. We had some guys take old fuel pumps and try to use them to pump water and they don't last very long nor do they pump well. Water conducts electricity a lot better than gasoline...
Lloyd Baker
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I'll take your word for it as it is indeed beyond me and you seem to have the credentials to back up the explanation. BUT while it seems like it would be a once in a blue moon condition that may lend itself to an explosion these type pumps have been used for decades concerning GM cars. It seems likely with the millions of cars produced during that time there surely would have been several once in a blue moons occourances. I have never heard of that happening.

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Hi Leon,
There are some other safety features designed in that take the probability of a major thermal event occuring to near zero. I just didn't want to go into them all.
The commutators and brushes are positioned and selected to provide a minimal spark magnitude to further reduce the likelyhood of combustion. The area inside the pump where any combustion would begin is very small. It would be a little bang so to speak. The pump body is a heavy steel and there is a check valve to prevent any flame from the little bang from escaping the pump body and getting into the tank.
Further because the fuel vapors are heavier than air it would take a long long time for them to escape from the tank and allow enough oxygen to enter and form a combustable mix. The car would likely have to sit out of gas with the gas cap off for months or years. The pump would have to pull the air mix into the brush chamber. That would again take a long time to draw the air in because the fuel pump isn't designed to move air. So it would take a long long long time to get the right conditions for combustion.
I add that I was not a fuel pump engineer so there are more things that I am forgetting about or probably don't even know about. I designed calibration systems to ensure that the measurements made by the fuel pump testers were accurate and precise, so I was somewhat on the perifery of the fuel pump's inner workings. I spent some time on a team trying to solve why ethanol was destroying the early electric fuel pumps and got to know the inside of a fuel pump pretty well from that experience.
And ethanol comes from plants and wood does too, so now we're back on topic...
--
Lloyd Baker



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Thank you LLoyd, those comments above, especially the one about the check valve are probably what I was looking for in an explanation.
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Glad I could help. I rarely have enough expertise to contribute much on this group but I really enjoy reading and learning from all of the others.
I hope someday to be able to escape the high tech rat race and have time to woodwork again for fun.
--
Lloyd Baker



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