table saw wax?

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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

No problem
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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Yeah, Doug. Get with the program.
*NOBODY* on the Wreck makes that kind of mistake.
Better send JOAT a piece of wood as penance to get your posting privileges back.
;-)
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Definition: USENET "open mouth, insert foot. Echo Internationally."
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On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 20:59:17 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Hell Doug, if that's the worst thing you do this week, you'll be way ahead of me.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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<<Next, you need to find a paste wax that does *not* contain silicone (which does baaad things to wood finishes). Three brands that are known to be silicone-free are Johnson's, Minwax, and Butchers.
Then, you need to find a place that actually sells one of those brands.>>
You can generally find one or more of those brands in a paint store.
Lee
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On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 04:10:46 -0400, "Lee Gordon"

Even the BORGs here in CT carry those brands, in the paint dept.
I have Trewax from a local paint store and it works well.
Barry
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Barry ...
<<Even the BORGs here in CT carry those brands, in the paint dept.>>
As a matter of fact I was at the Borg in Newington this afternoon and saw both Minwax and Butchers in the paint department. I have a spray can of stuff I bought at Coastal (CRC Table Guard) which I have sprayed on my table saw and my (formerly your) jointer.
Lee
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com says...

Johnsons. The Trewax seems to last longer. They claim (or at least they used to) that they have more carnuba wax than the others, thus making Trewax harder.
I think I bought mine at an Ace hardware last time, but it's been a while since I bought two cans then and have only a half can left.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 09:30:36 -0700, Larry Blanchard

I did! <G>
Barry
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Now go to a real hardware store. One that says 'Ace', or 'True Value', or 'Do it Best' on the front of the building. Or look for someone behind the counter who experienced the Eisenhower administration personally.
What you're looking for comes in a can, with a pry-off lid. Johnson's Paste Wax. Butcher's. Minwax. Briwax. Liberon. Something your grandmother would have used to polish a floor. Usually a mixture of carnuba & beeswax, with a solvent of some kind used to make it smearable.
Rub on a very thin coat, with a clean rag, as though you were polishing a pair of good leather shoes. Let it dry to a slight haze, then, with another clean rag, buff it off, rubbing hard to generate a little heat. What you're trying to end up with is a thin, slippery coat on the unpainted portions of the table. The idea is to reduce friction, and keep moisture from gathering, which invites rust.
Do this once a week or so, whether you think it needs it or not. The thickness of the wax will not build beyond what is required. Takes maybe 5 minutes. While it dries, check your blade for crud build up, your splitter for function, and make certain offcuts, chips and sawdust aren't where they shouldn't be.
Now, having thumped on the BORG, I give you permission to go back, if you must. They sometimes have what you need, but you will have to look. It's not a high volume item for anyone, anymore. Even busy woodworkers are unlikely to purchase very many cans in a hobbyist career.
Welcome to the fraternity of tablesaw owners. Enjoy your purchase safely.
Patriarch
ps: Get a copy of Kelly Mehler's 'The Tablesaw Book'. Trust his wise guidance.
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nice saw....enjoy!

Not surprised about that! Did they not know what mineral spirits is? :-) You can use any good automotive paste wax -works well for me. I'm sure there is a dedicated "table saw wax", but probably just automotive stuff at a higher price.

Never waxed a surfbard. ???????

Any good auto parts store should have an endless selection.

YW
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Newshound
DO NOT use automotive wax, they contain silcones that can rub off on the wood and cause finishing problems
Floor waxes like Johnsons/BriWax/etc are what should be used on on woodworking tools/tables
John
wrote:

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Yep, I agree, don't use an automotive wax with silicone. May have to look around (avoid the "easy" stuff), but there are plenty of automotive waxes that do not have silicone in them.

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This is true. Silicone became popular in car waxes when they came out with the liquid and soft waxes. It enabled them to be soft and easy yet still work. BTW, Johnson's works great on cars.

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Newshound responds:

Not a good ide aunless you're absolutely sure the auto wax is free of silicones.
Charlie Self "Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost." Russell Baker
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NO NO NO NO NO!
Automotive paste waxes frequently contain silicone, which *will* rub off on the wood and interfere with various types of wood finishes. To avoid finishing problems, you *must* use a silicone-free wax.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Frequently but not always.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 16:23:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

meguiar's deep crystal paste wax does *not* contain silicone. it's also formulated a bit harder than furniture wax, which is a good thing for the table saw top.
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I contacted Meguiar's about their waxes back around the first of the year, and they would neither confirm NOR deny the presense of silicone, but DID rather explicitly say that THEIR wax products were NOT appropriate and NOT recommended for used on cast iron woodwooding products
John
On Sun, 08 Aug 2004 10:53:43 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

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I've used it for years. it's worked well for me....

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