Table saw table smoothness

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Hi, it's me again.
I've found that another difference between the expensive saws and the Delta TS350 (the one I bought) is the smoothness of the cast iron table. Ony my table you can easily see the grinder marks and it has a few slightly rough spots where wood doesn't slide so easily (even afer waxing). I was thinking about going over it with 600-grit wet/dry sandpaper. Any thoughts?
Mike
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Like sanding a dining room table, sanding just the rough spots on the table saw would likely leave you with a table with low spots... unless the rough spots happen to stand proud (which seems unlikely). For a do itself fix, assuming the rough spots are causing a material problem, and are not only rough but generally below the rest of the surface, filling the area with epoxy body filler and then dressing to match up with the rest of the table would be the way to go. Alternatively, having the surface planed by a machine $hop is also an option. And of course, if the machine is under warranty the company may make good on it if the flatness is out of spec.
John
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I'm just wondering if I have a legitimate gripe with Delta. I put a straight edge to it and I can't see any high or low spots and I can't measure any with a feeler gauge, but I'm guessing the more expensive saws get a polishing wheel treatment where this one didn't?
The whole right side of the table is really smooth once I applied Johnson's Paste Wax. Things slide very nicely over that part of the table. It's just a 3/4" band down the left side of the throat plate opening; not gouged, but definitely not smooth. I could probably file my fingernails on it.
Might just be the downside of a $400 saw. This is my second TS350, because the first one had to go back to Lowe's because one side of the housing had a big dent in it.
Mike
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On 14 Jan 2006 10:24:32 -0800, upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Nope. I once wrote here about my Unisaw and its cast iron extension wing, "If I ate enough Wheaties I could turn this thing upside down and use it as a wood rasp."
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upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

There is absolutely no reason not to go over the rough areas with 600 grit wet or dry paper. You will have a hell of time taking off any significant amount of metal without power tools. Even if you did take off 1/1000 inch, it would never make any difference to your wood cutting. All you need to do is slightly round edges which is about all you can do with 600 grit hand sanded. But, you definitely want it smooth enough not to catch on wood.
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He wants to sand cast iron, with 600 grit, not maple with 240 grit! He can sand all day long with 600 grit and do little more than sand off the nubs left over from machining the top. Greg
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My comment was directed towards the notion of sanding just the rough spots rather than thinking about the top as a whole. I don't disagree with the slowness of iron removal where hand sanding or Speedbloc type sanders with 600 grit wet/dry papers are concerned... However, apply power via a belt sander and/or switch to emery cloth in coarser grits to speed things up and damage can happen quick... up to and including ruts. I've got a particular chuck of damaged cast iron in mind as I write these comments...
John
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A little food for thought here and Laguna Signature series backs up my thoughts on the subject.
While the more expensive saws do have a smoother surface IMHO this is not a plus when sliding wood over the top. I currently own a Jet Cabinet saw and it has a very smooth table surface. It replaced a Craftsman contractors saw with a cast iron top. The Craftsman surface is similar to what you described. You could basically see and feel the grind marks. The Craftsman when coated with TopCote had much less resistance when pushing wood over the surface than my Jet coated with TopCote. Basically there is more contact with the wood on a smoother surface that creates drag. Laguna demonstrates how the tops of their saws are kept in storage until it is to be attached to a TS. At that time they surface the top and etch the top so that it is not glass smooth. The reason for doing this is to cut down on surface friction so that the wood pushes more easily over the surface. Try TopCote or the Empire product to protect the top from rust and to cut down on friction. Personally I never was impressed with wax after using a product specifically formulated to prevent rust and reduce friction.
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On 14 Jan 2006 09:11:09 -0800, upand_at snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'd be careful here. What is most important is having a flat table. A light hand sanding with 600-grit might be okay.
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harm to the top. I have sanded ALL may cast iron tables when I first get the tool home. Wonderful difference. Greg
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Anybody here other than me actually take sand paper to metal?? Metal is some hard stuff! Trust me your arm will be tired long before you will do any damage with a sanding block and 600 grit!! Greg
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Greg O (in snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com) said:
| || Hi, it's me again. || || I've found that another difference between the expensive saws and || the Delta TS350 (the one I bought) is the smoothness of the cast || iron table. Ony my table you can easily see the grinder marks and || it has a few slightly rough spots where wood doesn't slide so || easily (even afer waxing). I was thinking about going over it || with 600-grit wet/dry sandpaper. Any thoughts? || || Mike || | | Anybody here other than me actually take sand paper to metal?? | Metal is some hard stuff! Trust me your arm will be tired long | before you will do any damage with a sanding block and 600 grit!! | Greg
After the flood of '93 I loaded up my SpeedBloc with 220 grit sandpaper and sanded for hours and hours (and hours!) to restore the much-rusted top of my Unisaur. The sanding did remove the rust; but not much of the grinder swirls.
As far as I can tell, it's better than (and as flat as) new.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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"Greg O" wrote in message

I think some folks may have a tendency to use a ROS or other powered sander. I can see where that would get you into trouble if you got to aggressive.
That said, I use Sandflex blocks on my CI tops whenever it becomes necessary ... good stuff.
--
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Rockler has a piece of Bubinga setting out for you. Its about 2"x30"x42". Only,,,$980.00. :~)
Also I bought a pair of Rockport XCS water proof shoes at Famous Footware across from Bearings Hardware at Bissonnet and Weslayan. On sale for $69.99 from $129.99. They had 1 pair of 11D's left, if you are interested. ;~) Moccasin toe however. I think the XCS's are discontinued and are being replaced by the pair you have on order. Geeez, I never thought I would be telling a frined about a shoe sale. Damn.
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"Leon" wrote in message

I saw it ... AAMOF, just left there a few minutes ago with some ceramic guide blocks for the BS. I plumb wore out the old cool blocks and decided it was time to tune-up the BS while I had nothing pressing going on in the shop.
I am applying for my own personal key on their damn cash register.

Next time you're that close, stop by ... I was just down the street, four blocks away, overseeing the mud slab being poured in a new crawlspace foundation.
On sale for $69.99

LOL ... hell, you've got my cell phone in case you see any deals on underwear, dearie. ;)
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Have you had one of those days where things just do not click? I thouht of you when I was buying the shoes but did even think of how close I was to your house until I got home.

Ohhh..
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wrote:

Me.
I've also put Scotchbrite pads and a little kerosene under a ROS.
I'd do it again... <G>
Barry
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Second that. The scotchbrite pad sticks nicely to the velcro on the ROS. However, the addition of kero (or in my case, WD-40/Galoot Aftershave) does make a big old mess when it's spun around. Don't wear your sunday best, and definately wear some kinda eye protection. Oh, and don't plan on kissin' the missus without showering first, cause you'll have a fine coating of rusty petroleum on you.
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And don't connect the vacuum hose. <G>
I dial the speed down and keep the pad on the table when starting and stopping. This will keep more of the lube on the table.
Barry
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Greg O wrote:

Yes, stupid woman putting wet things on the table saw. I always cover it with a piece of cardboard or she would screw it up on a regular bases. I mentioned that there was no problem in another response. Try hand sanding out some water rust marks. It takes forever.
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