table saw surface

I am looking for recommendations on how to maintain a cast iron table saw surface. The saw will sit in the garage where dampness is an occasional problem.
Thanks,
John
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Table Guard mfg. by CRC chemicals, can be found at: http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com/product.asp?3@89 . The beauty of this product is that it does not have to be removed before use and is innert to wood and it's very slick.
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when you aren't using it on a regular basis spray on Boeshield T-9 (don't wipe off).
when you are using it clean off the residue and apply a paste wax such as SC Johnson's and buff when dry. don't use anything with silicone in it.
dave
John wrote:

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If using the saw and not thinking STORAGE
Clean it good and apply several coats of either Johnson's or BriWax pastewax, OR a commerial table top treament like TopCote
Reapply either treatment frequently John
wrote:

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John Crea wrote:

I only had rust on my top once, after I stupidly left a piece of fresh pressure treated lumber sitting on it. What can I say? I was young and stupid. I'm older now and smell bad, but I digress.
I cleaned the rust off with steel wool and WD-40, cleaned the residue off with brake cleaner, and then applied a couple coats of Johnson's Paste Wax. I've never had a bit of rust on it since. Nor have I had to reapply wax all that often.
FWIW, the saw sits in the garage; I live in North Carolina where we have plenty of humidity in the summer.
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John, All those things mentioned by the others will work fine... but here's what I do. I keep a small bottle of Johnson's Baby Powder in the shop and occasionally sprinkle a little on my saw tables, especially after I clean it. I rub it in well and then wipe off all excess. The only difference is that I use my saw almost daily. If it truly will sit for long periods, then a wax or chemical might be better.
Larry
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Why not Silicone based products?
Rich

saw
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searcher1 wrote:

The silicon will migrate onto your project. It then buggers up any finish applied. Not good.
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Yea.... what he said.
Rich, The only silicon stuff I have in my shop is pure silicon spray that I use for lubrication. I've never bought any Boshield (sp?), SlipIt, or other products for table tops and I've never needed them. Now, on my Inca jointer, I use Watco satin wax because the beds are made of some kind of aluminum. But on my Delta, and on the saw and bandsaw tables, I use baby powder. When I'm stupid and set my coffee cup down on my saw table, and when it spills, and when I don;t get to it right away, I clean up the ring later with a PC 330 vibrating sander and wet/dry paper. Then I blow it off well, and add the baby powder.
We all use what works. I use baby powder. It works.
Larry -- Americans snipped-for-privacy@totacc.com

occasional
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John wrote:

Boeshield and Top Cote come to mind as the Wreck's usual answer to this question.
I've got a shiny new one myself. I don't have any of the above stuff, so I'm using Johnson's paste wax on it. I also have a cheap box fan on LO, pointing directly at it, and running 24/7 to keep the air moving and discourage condensation.
So far so good, but only time will tell. Good luck to both of our saws. I'm going to be a sad Silvan if this thing starts to rust.
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Running 24/7 is a bit much. It is only during times of big temperature change or humidity change that will make a difference. Or when you heat the shop after it has sat for a cold week. .
If it ever does rust, Top Saver is fantastic for removal. I put Top Cote on it after cleaning and it has been looking as good as when new. Tried wax, but I did not have great results with it. Maybe I just did not have it on heavy enough or often enough. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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