Table Saw Safety & The CPSC

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These folks tell you where to lodge your opinion. I Know you have one.
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/submit-your-comment-on-proposed-table-saw-rule?et_midR7805&rid "301377
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"The US Consumer Products Safety Commission is considering new safety regulations for table saws, based on a petition asking for a requirement that table saws should be equipped with a device to reduce or prevent injuries."
Gosh, I wonder what company could have filed that petition?
I actually love my Sawstop but I have heard the guy behind it is a lawyer (and a jerk) and part of the reason nobody licensed his technology was he was to greedy. Oh well, he got my money. P.S. I have not met him or have any personal knowledge os his ahole-ness just passing along what I heard.
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On 11/30/2011 4:43 PM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/submit-your-comment-on-proposed-table-saw-rule?et_midR7805&rid "301377
This is a lawyer law. Safety regulation should be based on facts.
How many fingers have been cut of per year per table saw in the last 100 years of their existence.
I suspect that the cost of the saw stop far exceeds the cost to society repairing cut of fingers. Cost of the saw stop must include cost to put it on the saw plus the cost of repairing the saw after the emergency stop.
The more safety device the more people assume there is no danger in using the tool, so since people will assume they are safe with the saw stop there will be more accidents with the saw.
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"knuttle" wrote in message
On 11/30/2011 4:43 PM, Lobby Dosser wrote:

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/editors-blog/submit-your-comment-on-proposed-table-saw-rule?et_midR7805&rid "301377
This is a lawyer law. Safety regulation should be based on facts.
How many fingers have been cut of per year per table saw in the last 100 years of their existence.
I suspect that the cost of the saw stop far exceeds the cost to society repairing cut of fingers. Cost of the saw stop must include cost to put it on the saw plus the cost of repairing the saw after the emergency stop.
The more safety device the more people assume there is no danger in using the tool, so since people will assume they are safe with the saw ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Germans were hesitant to issue parachutes to their pilots because they thought that if pilots had a way out, they wouldn't try to save the plane. stop there will be more accidents with the saw.
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knuttle wrote:

When I worked for the Exploration and Production laboratories of Shell Oil, we had a pretty loose consideration of safety rules, relying mostly on common sense. Then we got a new Vice President, recently reassigned from Shell's other lab on the west coast. He was absolutely nutty about safety.
He implemented a rule that all gas bottles had to be chained to the wall!
Sure enough, a fellow pushing a cart with two dewars of liquid nitrogen passed a stack of gas bottles, the same stack he had passed every day for years.
He hit the stack with his cart.
Even though the bottles were chained, he knocked one bottle of nitrogen loose. It fell and knocked off the valve. Like a torpedo, it went through the wall and into the parking lot.
Safety rules vs. being alert. Which to choose? Let me think...
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And how many more bottles would have done the same if they hadn't been chained up?

Both!
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Stuart Winsor

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I recall that when ABS brakes were installed in police cruisers, collisions increased for just that reason.
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Woodworking and more at <http://www.woodenwabbits.com

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On 12/4/2011 12:18 PM, Dave Balderstone wrote:

And why most of the driving population today, who have no idea or respect for the engineering principles behind braking an automobile because they were never taught the basics, including that brakes FAIL, see no problem with driving five feet behind the car in front of them at 80mph.
I swear, younger female drivers appear to be the worst of the bunch. My own daughter, as much as I fuss, will drive 30 mph up to a stop sign and put on the brakes at the last possible moment.
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"Swingman" wrote

As some one who has had two major incidents where my brakes did fail, I can relate. I obsessively look for the emergency brake in each vehicle I drive. I was always safety conscious. I can not imagine what would have happened if I wasn't. Nothing like a near death experience to get the safety religion.
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On Sun, 4 Dec 2011 13:56:04 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

I was doing about 75 in a rural area, half crocked, when my master cylinder bypassed. After the third time my foot hit the floor with the pedal under it, I dropped into third, then second, then missed my turn. I had to go over a deep swale where the other road was a straighter shot than the 70 degree turn I had wanted. Just before I hit the swale, I popped the wheel to the left, then quickly right, and shoved the tail over a foot and a half to the left, aiming at the hole between two lines of parked cars. I bounced over it and stayed between the cars until it slowed down a bit. I think I hit that 15mph bump at at least 45. Thank Crom for the Javelin's strong rear leafs, but it bottomed those out.
Even shitfaced, I pulled it out where a typical driver would have t-boned a car or rolled it into a house. Some skills and a whole lot of luck.
Luckily, I sobered up not too long after that, and sobriety has lasted 27+ years now.
-- Self-development is a higher duty than self-sacrifice. -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton
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"Lee Michaels" wrote in message
As some one who has had two major incidents where my brakes did fail, I can relate. I obsessively look for the emergency brake in each vehicle I drive. ===================================================================You'd like my Ranger. To apply the E-brake, you have to stick your left knee in your ear to get your foot high enough.
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I resemble that! Got in it one time after my wife had driven it and the damn e-brake was on. Took a while to figure what was wrong as it never occurred to me that somebody could set the damn thing.
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wrote:

'Tis a foolish person who does not know the operation of and USES the emergency brake on a daily basis.
-- Self-development is a higher duty than self-sacrifice. -- Elizabeth Cady Stanton
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On the Ranger, it is useless for most purposes. See sticking knee in ear ...
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Somebody wrote:

----------------------------- When I learned to drive back in Northern Ohio, you quickly learned to NEVER use the emergency in the winter.
Trying to drive a vehicle with a pulled, frozen emergency brake cable is a bear.
Lew
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Yeah, that was a Once ...
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wrote:

And then you guys learned that a pair of half inch wrenches (oops, 12mm in the Ranger's case, or 10mm cuz they're odd?) and ten minutes time (including jacking) would have allowed the release of the brakes.
-- In reality, serendipity accounts for one percent of the blessings we receive in life, work and love. The other 99 percent is due to our efforts. -- Peter McWilliams
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On Mon, 5 Dec 2011 20:56:08 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

BTDT. Good advice in wet weather in cold climates. If you don't use the brake on a regular basis, it can stick at any time, even in the heat.
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in ----------------------------- When I learned to drive back in Northern Ohio, you quickly learned to NEVER use the emergency in the winter.
Trying to drive a vehicle with a pulled, frozen emergency brake cable is a bear. ************************* I had a old 4 barrel carb pontiac, that always idled way too fast until it was good and warmed up.
If you tried to brake on icy roads, you would lose control, because the power going to the rear wheels kept them from locking up, while the front brakes did lock up. No pumping would fix the problem. The only thing that helped was to slip the automatic transmission into neutral before you wanted to stop.
-- Jim in NC
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wrote:

Buy a car or truck that FITS YOU, silly person. It ain't rocket science.
-- With every experience, you alone are painting your own canvas, thought by thought, choice by choice. -- Oprah Winfrey
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