Table Saw Ripping Questions

I am starting with 2" squares. I plan on ripping in half a dozen or so 2" squares by 24 " long hardwoods (cherry, maple). I want to rip them down the centerline so each ends up 1" x 2" x 24". I have done quite a bit of cross cutting on the table saw in the past but never much ripping. I don't want to be too paranoid about ripping, but I certainly want to respect the saw. Assuming that I use a sharp new blade (10" - 24 teeth carbide) my questions are: Since the pieces are only 24 inches long will kickback be a real problem? Secondly, since I will only have 1" between the blade and the fence at setup, would a 1/4" oak push stick work alright? If kickback will probably be a problem can I buy some kind of inexpensive splitter kit somewhere. I doubt that I will cut more than a dozen of these a year so I am not looking for an elaborate expensive setup that will gather dust...... I probably would feel better if I could install an inexpensive splitter. Any thoughts appreciated.
-Thanks!!... and My Fingers Thank You!!
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I know you don't want to spend a lot, but the gripper from micro jig http://www.microjig.com / makes the operation so much safer. I have two of them and use them all the time.
Jim www.woodblog.com

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First off, you realize that you will not end up with 2, 1"x24" pieces if you rip a 2"x24" down the center line. Remember that the blade will remove about 1/8".
Bick back can happen but you can safely rip these lengths if you use a push stick. I prefer the type push stick that also holds the board down about 8" in front of the back end of the board. Basically it also holds the wood down in addition to pushing the wood.
You can get a good inexpensive splitter, $14.95, to be used with a zero clearance insert here: http://www.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/product_family.asp?family%5FidP67&gift úlse&mscssid65576575AFE41B693D5B69951BDD21

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Buck, Do not panic. Ripping is simple with a properly setup saw. For the size you are ripping, definitely us a push stick. When ripping a 1" wide piece, use a 3/4" wide with a deep overreach.
http://www.woodzone.com/images/tips/rectpushstick.jpg
These can be made very easily from scrap.
For this king of ripping, I would suggest the blade should be higher than the depth of the cut by 1/2" or so. This is a highly subjective number and that I'm sure will be discussed ad nauseum.
Rip away!
Dave

the
cross
questions
will
dust......
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At that part size, and production volume, I'd find a bandsaw to use. Even if it were a friend's, or one at an adult ed school. Feels safer, wastes less wood, never kicks back, etc.
You're the fellow making the musical instrument flutes, right? What part of the country are you in?
Patriarch
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-patriarch..... Yes I'm that guy..... trying my hand (and fingers) in making some Native American flutes..... Might work out and then again maybe not. I never liked ripping wood in the past but did manage. Since this is 2" stock it will be a little trickier. The overall length is only 24 inches and I think it should be manageable - but just wanted to touch base with the people on this board who are the experts..... like yourself!
Thanks for input..... I am living in CO
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calmly ranted:

As far as I know, the traditional Indian methods didn't use table saws, bandsaws, routers, or box core bits, buck. ;)
----------------------------------------- Jack Kevorkian for Congressional physician! http://www.diversify.com Wondrous Website Design ================================================
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WHY YOU I AUTTA!........................... LOL
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wrote:
You'll get beter replies form the excellent people here, but what I do, strictly for safety, is to use longer pieces, and cut to just past the marked length. Then gently raise the wood from the saw [or turn off first], and crosscut to get the length. It's a bit of waste, but I usually find other uses ...toaster tongs etc., and get to keep my fingers.
Re kickback: use a suitable hold-down system.
Bill.

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.... Great idea Bill..... Never thought of that..... In this case however I need all 24 inches so it's all the way thru...

2"
the
cross
want
saw.
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Make yourself a "push board" that covers the entire length of the short pieces. Somthing along the lines of a 2x6 or 2x8 with a small cleat glued on the bottom edge back corner.
This will allow you to have complete forward and downward pressure during the cut. Keep the blade just above the cut and let it cut directly into the "push board". It will allow "total control" with little exposure to the blade.
buck wrote:

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WELL.... HERE IS WHAT I DID. I ripped 2 black walnut, 2 maple, and 1 cherry. I used two push boards/sticks and took my time to be careful. In fact I took so much time that I burned most all of them.....LOL. I am looking at this as a learning experience and hopefully will get better as time goes on and I continue to buy more new blades. I would suggest you all buy stock in Home Depot. I didn't experience any kickback problems. I did notice that when I was half way through a couple of pieces that the leading edge wanted to start coming up off the table but I just pressed harder at the trailing edge and that seemed to take care of it. Any suggestions for 10 inch blades in the $20-30 range??
-Thanks to everyone for you comments and suggestions. Over and Out!
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I'm spoiled. I have the grip-tite magnetic featherboards with a the grip-tite steel fence face. I could do what you need confidently with no fear of kick back using this system. I had too many near misses trying to do narrow rips with a push stick. The suggestions already posted for pushstick design are good. But I don't believe any pushstick can firmly hold and guide the wood like the grip-tite system. I also found that my cuts were more consistently accurate because the system pulls the wood tight against the fence as it feeds.
By the way, I also have two GRRRippers and they work well with small pieces but the grip-tites are superior for ripping narrow pieces 24 inches long.
Bob
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bob..... I checked out the grip tite feather board. Interesting item but don't see how to push a narrow board thru without the featherboard getting in the way??? Am I missing something here?

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bob..... I just checked my TS and it all aluminum so no magnets are sticking to it..... I know I can get a steel guard but that doesn't help the table top.... guess not the way to go for me.

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The Grip Tites are really nice, but think push BLOCK, not STICK.
I do narrow ripping with an MDF or plywood block that looks just like a 12" long jointer push block. This block has a handle attached to the top, a 1/4" MDF or wood lip on the back edge, and strips of a $1 Staples mouse pad glued to the bottom, rubber towards the work.
The blade is raised 1/8" higher than the thickness of the wood. The mouse pad and rear hook are considered sacrificial. The block holds the work down and against the fence.
Using this method, I've ripped perfect 1/8" strips from a 1/4" thick board.
Did I mention the tool cost less than $2?
Barry
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