Table Saw Question

I have an old cast iron craftsman 10" table saw but it does not have an motor. Can anyone tell me if the motor was a 1hp 3450rpm? The saw is in good shape and I would like to get it working again. Thanks
--
b



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Boots wrote:

Probably, but I'd consider 1 hp minimal...at least 1.5 would be my recommendation...
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They came with 1 hp but you would be happier with 1.5.
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Who knows? Over the years Sears had HP numbers all over the spectrum from 1 to 3 or more. In reality it probably was about 1 HP, and as the others have stated, you might (MIGHT) be happier with 1.5. However, don't bother going any higher than that. The design of the saw with gravity providing the belt tension (and iffily at that) any more HP than about 1 is just throwing money down the drain.
3450 is the correct speed. Watch the rotation on some of the motors you'll be looking at. You'll want clockwise (as when looking at the shaft), or reversible. You'll also be happier with a 120/240V motor so you can run it on 240. It won't be any cheaper or efficient and it won't give you any more power, but if your shop is a long way from the service entrance, you might see a difference in performance due to lower I^2R losses at the higher voltage.
A NEMA 56 frame will bolt right on. That's a pretty common frame for motors so it shouldn't be a problem. Other frame types may work but if you don't know, keep looking for a 56.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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Hey Boots, what's the Sears number on that machine? (It's usually three digits followed by a period then several more digits). With that number in hand, go to Sears.com, click on "Parts" near the bottom of the page, and enter your number. You'll often be able to download a manual, or at least see a breakdown of the machine.
FYI, Craftsman has marketed hundreds of TS combinations through the years. I have a 1980s 3hp industrial behemoth sold under the Craftsman aegis.
Regards, H
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Hey Boots, what's the Sears number on that machine? (It's usually three digits followed by a period then several more digits). With that number in hand, go to Sears.com, click on "Parts" near the bottom of the page, and enter your number. You'll often be able to download a manual, or at least see a breakdown of the machine.
FYI, Craftsman has marketed hundreds of TS combinations through the years. I have a 1980s 3hp industrial behemoth sold under the Craftsman aegis.
Regards, H
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Hey Boots, what's the Sears number on that machine? (It's usually three digits followed by a period then several more digits). With that number in hand, go to Sears.com, click on "Parts" near the bottom of the page, and enter your number. You'll often be able to download a manual, or at least see a breakdown of the machine.
FYI, Craftsman has marketed hundreds of TS combinations through the years. I have a 1980s 3hp industrial behemoth sold under the Craftsman aegis.
Regards, H
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thanks for all the help will check it out
Hey Boots, what's the Sears number on that machine? (It's usually three digits followed by a period then several more digits). With that number in hand, go to Sears.com, click on "Parts" near the bottom of the page, and enter your number. You'll often be able to download a manual, or at least see a breakdown of the machine.
FYI, Craftsman has marketed hundreds of TS combinations through the years. I have a 1980s 3hp industrial behemoth sold under the Craftsman aegis.
Regards, H
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I have two vintage cast iron 10" table saws. Both model numbers are 113.XXXXX. They both have 3450 RPM motors. One has the the original Crafstman 1 HP motor. I upgraded the other to a 2 HP motor. Both are great saws. I bot one for $35 and the other was free. Why two you ask. I have one at home and the other at the vacation home.

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is about right for this saw. FYI, Emerson discontinued repulsion induction motors in 1953. Jim
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Hmmm......I didn't think Craftsman needed to induce any more repulsion! <g>
Mike O.
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