table saw push stick or push block or ???

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So you're saying the difference is only how big of a mouth the bird has? The leverage is working against you anytime you're pushing the stock. If the handle is up-front, I'd agree that it's less likely to cause a kickback (because the leading edge lifts). Leverage is working for you. But, as long as the handle is behind the stock, it's not in your favor. I'll stick with featherboards and a couple of birds.
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On 8/3/2015 8:37 PM, krw wrote:

The handle is at about 45 degrees in back so you can put some downward pressure. You can make it as high as you want and change the angle to what makes you comfortable and safe. Simple physics. Get a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood and you can make it as big or small as you want.
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How far back would the handle have to be? By the time it's back far enough to push the wood completely through the saw, wouldn't it tend to be rather cumbersome to handle?
If you make the handle tall, then the hand can safely pass over the spinning parts to complete the cut. The cut isn't complete until the wood has passed by the blade completely, at least on the fence side.
Puckdropper
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On 8/2/15 9:46 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Someone is just stuck in his ways. Shoe blocks are overwhelmingly considered to be a much safer and more effective means of passing stock through a table saw blade by the vast majority of the woodworking community.
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On 8/2/2015 8:58 PM, krw wrote:

Well let me warn you that some times what appears to be flat and straight stock will can not appear that way after being cut. Be careful with any stock.

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Always. Which is why my fingers never go beyond the front of the spinning blade.

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On 8/2/2015 8:58 PM, krw wrote:

Yep that's true...
As is the case with almost all jigs (tenon, spline, taper, et al) used for various operations on the table saw that have been in use for a hundred years or more.
However, and having long respected your expertise and not arguing with your valid point, something else for the newer folks here to consider when deciding which is the best solution for them.
Since it is impossible to eliminate all risk, the idea is to _minimize risk_ with a design that:
~ Gets the hand a relatively safe distance away/above the blade.
~ At the same time uses the _minimum_ amount of force/effort to maintain adequate downward pressure AND pushing force.
IME, the further the hand exerting force is moved back toward the operator, and away from the workpiece being pushed, the more force/effort required from that hand to provide _downward_ force on the workpiece.
Using more force/effort than necessary on a workpiece being pushed in the direction of the blade arguably increases the chance of being injured during a kickback or bind.
Some folks, particularly those with very strong wrists, may not have a problem with this.
The ability to almost effortlessly maintain minimum force in both planes is why I like the design I use, which has stood the test of time for me with regard to safe operation ... so far.
YMMV ...
Table saw is a dangerous tool, best way to never get hurt by one is to not use one .... and not even a SawStop can protect you from all danger.
Have the scars of 13 stitches in a thumb from a table saw ... damned thing wasn't even plugged in, and didn't have a blade installed.
ER still classified as a "table saw accident". :(
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On 8/3/15 9:03 AM, Swingman wrote:

I probably missed it, but what design?
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On 8/3/2015 10:56 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

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On 8/3/15 1:19 PM, Leon wrote:

Found it... <https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5684918928011997682 I don't care what you say, there's no way two bird's mouth push sticks are better than ONE of these. Anyone who's used both won't go back to push sticks.
Sideways pushing feather boards do very little to hold the stock down against the table. Unless you're using a featherboard vertical pressure, you still need to hold the work down. And then why would you bother setting it up when a shoe accomplishes both, safely, with one hand instead of two.
Some people are stuck in their ways and refuse to admit the advantages of new* ideas. (* the show type push block has to be at least 50 years old)
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-MIKE- wrote:

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On 8/3/2015 8:56 PM, Bill wrote:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5684918928011997682

Yep ...
Simply make your own pattern and cut them out on the bandsaw/jigsaw about once every couple of years.
You can move the bottom "hook" further away from the handle, or orient the handle to curve the other way, whichever is more comfortable for you.
Use scrap 3/4" ply for some, 1/2" for some, and 1/4" for a smaller version when making edge banding.
Amazing how beat up they get, which would otherwise be a finger, or worse.
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Perhaps most but a taper jig shouldn't be on that list. It's easy to make them long enough such that the hand doesn't have to get anywhere near the blade.

Certainly. Everything has some amount of risk associated with it (even staying in one's bed). Life is about trading off risk and benefit. Woodworking has a benefit, so I assume some risk.

That's where featherboards come in handy (at least for ripping, where the most danger of kickback is).

OK. Again, if I'm worried about kickback (and that's often) I use featherboards in both planes, and a splitter (or knife).

Sure. But it's a fun tool. ;-)

The only damage I've done to myself on the saw was when it wasn't plugged in. I've come close when it was spinning down, though.

Sure, and if someone crosses a double yellow and hits someone coming home from happy hour, it's still an alcohol related accident, too. A friends wife got hit by a bicycle (she stopped and the kid kept going - looking behind him). It was classified as an automobile-pedestrian collision and their insurance still paid. Who said that government statistics have any meaning? ;-)
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On 8/3/2015 11:44 AM, krw wrote:

I came close the second time mine was spinning down. I was successful the first time.

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@swbelldotnet says...

One tool I have that scares me a bit is the 18v deWalt circular saw--my other saw is a worm drive Skil that pretty much demands to be handled with two hands, but the deWalt is so light that I often use it with one, and one of these days I'm afraid my other one is going to be in the wrong place. Still, it's so damned _convenient_.
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On Mon, 3 Aug 2015 16:31:40 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Tell me that you don't use it with the work piece across your lap!
I use mine quite a lot (gave away of all the other tools except the lights and the circular saw, though) but have never felt it to be unsafe. I've used my Makita, one-handed, on a ladder, though. ;-)
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says...

Hey, I may be stupid but I'm not _crazy_.

I've used a chainsaw on a ladder. Oh, you mean _standing_ on the ladder . . .
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On Mon, 3 Aug 2015 21:49:50 -0400, "J. Clarke"

great. The Makita saw didn't have enough torque to get me into trouble. It cut cedar siding really well but not much more.
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On Sat, 1 Aug 2015 21:31:18 -0500

do people apologize here for giving their opinions i had not noticed
i use the push stick for small pieces
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On 8/2/15 10:21 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Rarely. :-)
They do, however, use punctuation most of the time.
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