table saw push stick or push block or ???

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On 8/2/2015 11:27 AM, Leon wrote:

Yep, about 95% of the time with the larger, heavy duty ones.
Most of the time I end up using the smaller ones, backed up by the larger ones if necessary.
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On Sat, 1 Aug 2015 16:42:56 -0500

i am planning on making a couple of jigs or at least one for the bandsaw so will have to research a little on form & function of feather boards

yes kind of obvious i think

this does make sense although i don't have a dado set yet
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On 8/1/2015 10:36 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods?noredirect=1#5684918928011997682
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Mine is similar to that, except the handle goes the other way. I don't like the designs that put the hand in front of the notch pushing the board, because I think they can rotate around the front and lift the notch. I think the hand needs to be behind and above the notch so the line of force goes thru the notch into the board.
That's for the table saw. For the bandsaw and router table I just use any handy piece of scrap with a flat side. On the jointer I use push pads on top of the stock.
John
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On 8/1/2015 3:32 PM, John McCoy wrote:

And mine is similar to Swingmans except mine is shorter and the handle is more on top.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/20208704605/in/dateposted-public/
I have been using this design for about 16 years and this one is probably that old. I have a few as back ups. I made it out of 1/2" Baltic birch plywood so it does not weaken much as more of it gets cut away, in width. It is getting close to retirement.
An important aspect to this design is that I can apply quite a bit of pressure down on the board to prevent what you have described, the notch lifting. More importantly, that downward force helps to prevent the board/work from lifting as it passes the back side of the blade.
Those push sticks that do not hold the work down scare the hell out of me. They keep your hands away from the blade but do nothing to keep the work from being lifted and thrown back at you.
http://www.harborfreight.com/push-stick-33279.html
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*snip*

The closest I've ever been to a major accident on my table saw was caused by that style of push stick. It was homemade, but the same concept...
A safer push stick is super easy to build, or you can *gasp* buy one. (I'd avoid the "high tech" or mousepad style pushers for table saw use.)
Puckdropper
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On 8/1/15 5:15 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Push sticks should be outlawed. I can't fathom why anyone would use one since they offer NO resistance to the blade pushing the stock upwards. They are slightly less dangerous than using your hand.
Use a shoe that holds the stock down to the table as it pushes it through the blade. Push sticks are for idiots... and I say that un-apologetically.
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The idea is to keep your fingers out of the rotating parts. They aren't intended to fix kick-back.

I often use featherboards and was looking at these at Woodcraft, yesterday.
http://www.jessemdirect.com/product_p/04301.htm
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On 8/1/15 9:41 PM, krw wrote:

Well, I guess you could spend 300 bucks on those or make a shoe in 5 minutes out of a buck's worth of scrap wood.
I stand by what I said. Those crow's mouth type push sticks are for those who don't like being able to count to ten.
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wrote:

$250 at Woodcraft but yes, they're expensive. They also do the job of the featherboards (in both planes).

Nonsense. As long as your fingers never go past the blade you're not going to get 'em chopped off. Push sticks keep them out of the blade. You might get hit in the gut with a hunk of board but that's why it's good not to stand behind the workpiece.
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wrote:

They aren't intended to encourage kick-back, either, but that's what those dangerous birdsmouth push sticks do. If you put downward pressure on the very edge of something like a board, the board will tend to lift at the opposite end.
Considering how easy it is to make a push device that fixes that problem, there's no reason to ever use the birdsmouth style push stick. Ever.

The best saw to use the birdsmouth push sticks on is the compound miter saw. Hold it square against the fence, and make a cut. Now you've got a scrap to use to double check the squareness of the fence.
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On 02 Aug 2015 11:15:11 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

If the piece is that warped, perhaps. The birdsmouth is intended to push towards the blade, not down.

Disagree.

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On 8/2/15 10:35 AM, krw wrote:

Exactly. What's holding the stock down to the table when the blade it trying to lift and throw it? Many things we cut on the table saw aren't heavy enough to stay against the table surface when cutting.
I've seen guys use two seperate bird's mouth push sticks to try to push the stock through the blade AND hold it down at the front.
Again I ask, why not use a simple shoe type push guide that controls the stock in both directions and only takes one hand to use?
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On 8/2/2015 12:33 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I have both types. Once I made the shoe type, I don't think I ever used the bird again. The one I made has a handle like a handsaw and you can get a firm grip on it.
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wrote:

If I suspect that anything bad could happen, a featherboard. If the stock is true, I don't bother.

Featherboards.

I will use two push sticks. One to push and one to hold down near the blade. I have a strict rule when using the table saw; no fingers beyond the blade until it stops spinning.

Because the fingers have to go past the spinning parts.
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On 8/2/2015 9:58 PM, krw wrote:

Not if you put the handle back far enough.
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Then you've got the same problem as the birds mouth push sticks.
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On 8/2/15 9:33 PM, krw wrote:

Do you even know what a shoe/heel push block is and how it works?
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wrote:

Yes. I know a little about physics, too. <sheesh>
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On 8/2/2015 10:33 PM, krw wrote:

Not really. The typical bird's mouth grips only about 3/4" or so. With a block it can be as long as you want ti to be. Mine is about 8" and the handle grip in back of that. You can exert a reasonable amount of downward pressure and still stay behind the blade.
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