Table Saw Molding Head

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Yeah -- Old memories. My cousin was cutting moulding with a Craftsman 3-blader many years ago on a RAS. He felt a thud on one hand and looked down at his shirt which was covered with blood, tissue and bone fragments. You can guess the rest. The damage was limited to the end of one finger above the joint.
The surgery and recoup from trying to restore part of the fingertip was almost worse than the injury itself. Horrible looking mess. He was a union utility worker at the time and had to have all of his digets in working order.
He is a talented woodworker to this day but the old RAS, and moulding head is ancient history to him.
RonB
RonB
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Lesson to be learned here: don't stick your hand in the path of a moving blade. Pretty universal

union
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;~) I was not gonna say it.
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Toller said this, remember.

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On Tue, 27 Mar 2007 20:46:47 GMT, "Leon"

Maybe not crazy, but not as safe as a perfectly balanced molding head. The more balanced the the cutter head, the less vibration. A well-balanced blade assembly will give you a cleaner cut too.
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Ok, lets stop and think here for a moment. This single head cutter is not a fluke, flash in the pan tool that was here today and gone tomorrow. I first saw them some 25 years ago. I have heard of no incidents regarding problems with the cutter, have you? True they probably do not leave as smooth of a cut given the same feed rate but as long as the cutter is balanced there should be no vibration. I suspect that if there was significant vibration that the tool would have never made it out of the R&D department. Huge and heavy by comparison engine crank shafts are very irregular in shape and when balanced can spin at speeds in excess of 12,000 rpms.
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Yeah - I have occasionally been tempted to calculate the tip speed of the cutters running on my table saw and compare it to a 30-06. I'll bet they are in the same neighborhood if one came off. Like I said earlier, mine is on the shelf but doesn't get a lot of use.
Of course you could say the same about other tools.
RonB
RonB
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"RonB" wrote

I had a safety freak shop teacher in high school who used ask questions on his tests of how many times a tool could hit you or cut you before the signal would reach the brain to react. The big damage is done long before you pull the hand away.
Fast moving metal and flesh are not compatable.
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Not even close, actually. Following is a very rough approximation:
Typical molding head has a diameter of 7 or 8 inches. Circumference then is about two feet. 2' x 4500 rpm = 9000 fpm = 150 fps or about 100mph.
Much too fast to dodge, but nowhere near the muzzle velocity of any rifle.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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No, the tip speed on you TS is no where near a 30-06, or a 22 for that matter. The typical 10" blade turns at about 3600 rpm. The blade is 31.4 inches around or 2.61 feet around. 2.61' x 3600 + 9420' per minute. That comes out to about 107 MPH. IIRC the typical 22 has a muzzle velocity of around 1100 feet per second and that comes out to about 7 times faster. A 30-06 with a 150 grain bullet travels at about 2700 feet per second or about 17 times faster than your saw blade. If you are spinning a smaller diameter dado or molding cutter the tip speed would be slower than the 10" blade.
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It would still earn you a trip to the emergency room - or worse.
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If the whole cutter came loose and hit you I would agree. If a small fragment came loose, probably not.

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Hello,new here but seems strange that tommorow I will be using the cutter head (3) again and yes I am afraid of it, the weird noise and the wind it makes. Although have you tried it on a radial arm? Now that is spooky but hey by the end of this year I will have the router completely set up, and I feel fairly safe with the router. Have a good evening Jim in WI
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I too would prefer a router or a shaper for the job, but that's because I generally try to stay away from tools that have been adapted to a secondary use. Having said that, if you think about the speed of your router and the speed of your table saw, and you throw in the fact that routers have been known to throw carbide (especially with cheap bits), you might be more concerned about that router. It's typically somewhere near 3 to 6 times faster than that table saw blade.
--

-Mike-
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Although it would be a relativly small hole at those speeds it would go straight throug you assuming you hit no bone. Assuming also you have hit no major organs I hope you keep at least 2 band aids in your safety kit.
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Naw. The fragment might cut you cut certainly not go through you. I have been hit by fragments of wood many times thought the years and they mostly bounce off. And while that is only wood, I have also had fragments of carbide go flying also and never see any signs of it hitting anything. Do you think a pro baseball pitcher could throw a small fragment of carbide hard enough to go through your arm or hand? Not likely and he can throw pretty much as fast as the tip speed op a 10" blade on a TS. I have had a fragment of a 22 bullet hit me and it did not penetrate although I did receive a red spot. There simply is not enough mass to overcome the resistance.
Now if a whole tooth or cutter came loose, that would be a different story, still I don't think it would go through you as a 22 bullet seldom goes through at speeds 7 time faster.
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the
is
Not even close to the same neighborhood. In fact, the table saw isn't even close to the lead sled speed of a .45ACP.
--

-Mike-
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CORRECT. LOL And the 22 caliber is 7 times faster than a 10" TS blade tip and only 2/3's the muzzle velocity of a 45.
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Now maybe you should compare the energy of the 200 grain bullet with the weight of the cutter and compare the total energy of both?

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That's not necessary. The comments you are replying to were simply in response to the preceding comment which speculated that the speed of a cutter coming off would approximate the speed of a 30-06 bullet.
--

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