Table saw mitres

Anybody into making "box(es)" with mitres cut onna table saw?
I'm thinking of making a couple cremation urns in that fashion. Someone might know a trick or 2?? I couldn't find any free plans ...
Thx, Peetie
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On 12/10/2011 11:46 PM, Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

the table saw. I use a gauge similar to this one at Rockler
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 030&filter=miter%20gauges
Since these gauges have fixed 90 degree angles it takes one source of error from the cut.
I don't have to tell you accurate angles are only half the battle, the sides must be precisely the same length to get good miters.
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On 12/11/2011 9:20 AM, knuttle wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 113&filter=clamp-it
then I suspect the results will be less than satisfactory. The description says "... Since both pieces reference off a perfect 90° angle, the miters will fit perfectly." but based on my experience with the Clamp-It, I think that sentence might better be written as "IF both pieces reference off a perfect 90° angle..."

Only if it's truly a perfect 90° angle. If it's out-of-square by 0.025" over a 6" length (as were the Clamp-Its that I bought, and promptly returned) that will produce an error of a tenth of an inch on *each leg* of a 24" frame.
I strongly recommend that anyone considering the purchase of either this product, or the Clamp-It, should check it for square with one of the Starrett combination squares that Rockler also sells.
If you want something that you can be sure is an accurate 90°, get a set of "3D Squares" from Jevons Tool Co.
http://jevonstoolco.com/_wsn/page3.html
I bought a set of four at the Indianapolis Woodworking Show about six or seven years ago -- a bit pricy, but well worth it. I've never regretted the purchase. As far as I can tell, they're dead on perfect right angles.
(Obligatory disclaimer: I have no connection with Jevons Tool Company, except as a *completely* satisfied customer.)
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Interesting. And reasonably priced.
When next I need to make frames I may well try such device.

*Everything* must be damn nigh perfect ...
Thx, Peetie
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On 12/11/2011 7:12 PM, Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

When I posted earlier I could not find what I wanted and posted something similar.
I don't know if this is the same brand but this is what I have. I have modified it so the gauge is more in the middle of the bar that runs in the table saw slot.
With the modifications. I have as much bar in the slot which ever way I need to put the gauge on the saw. (While it says you can clamp you piece to the back of the gauge, I find it more accurate to flip the gauge to get the direction on the angle.)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/90-Degree-Double-Miter-Gauge-Fence-4-Band-Table-Saw-/120791622919
The unit being a molded piece retains the 90 degree angle, even if it accidently gets knocked off of the saw. (I realize no one would ever do anything like that but just in case)
As for accuracy of the gauge I believe matches any other type of miter gauge and pobably a lot better the most even the much more expensive. It is quick to set up and easy to use.
With the gauge it has been years since I botched a frame because of bad miters.
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Neat! I'll definitely keep this in mind.
I would never buy something like this from ebay without a good recommendation from an actual user.
Thanks, Peetie

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On 12/10/2011 10:46 PM, Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

As opposed to the other responses, I presume you mean cutting miters on flat, wide stock to make box sides rather than picture frame stock across the stock.
It's certainly doable; I've done it a fair amount but the saw has to be set up verrrry well. I could _not_ do it on the first old contractors saw as the arbor mount wasn't quite parallel so on a 45 the blade wasn't in plane w/ the table accurately enough. The PM Model 66 takes care of that problem. :)
NB as well that the miter gauge or cutting sled used also has to be right as you have both angles in play. There are fancy ways to measure whether you have the 45 angle or not; I don't bother but simply use a test cut and measure the 90 of the resulting pieces. At most this is a slight adjustment as again the Model 66 is solid enough as to be essentially perfect once set up once.
BTW, once you are almost there if it's a problem you can use the trick outlined w/ the other poster's 90-degree pattern--cut mating corners on alternate sides or if the stock is clear and matches well simply make a cut and flip over and continue from a single piece. If grain is distinct that doesn't work so well from grain matching, of course...
In a nutshell, it can be done but requires a seriously good setup -- oh, and you'll want to clamp the workpieces going thru 'cuz they _will_ want to slide on the face of the miter gauge/sled fence.
--
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Correct.
You, kind sir, are in possession of a -real- table saw. I have but an old Craftsman, but that makes it more challenging.

It's true, one really needs a near perfect setup but ...
Years ago, as an experiment, I cut some 10 x 4" pieces from one-by hardwood, set the blade to 45 degrees and cut miters on the 10" side, all but the last maybe 1/8" (so I could turn each piece around and rip-miter the other side). The corners of the glued-up result were rounded and other embellishments were made on a router table. Added a bottom piece, finished, and it was like a vase for artificial flowers. Gave it to a friend's wife, she liked it.
I guess I'll try something similar with the urns. It's crude, but with a good deal of care, it will hopefully be effective given the tools/skills available.
Thanks, Peetie
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...

It's true, one really needs a near perfect setup but ...
Years ago, as an experiment, I cut some 10 x 4" pieces from one-by hardwood, set the blade to 45 degrees and cut miters on the 10" side, all but the last maybe 1/8" (so I could turn each piece around and rip-miter the other side). The corners of the glued-up result were rounded and other embellishments were made on a router table. Added a bottom piece, finished, and it was like a vase for artificial flowers. Gave it to a friend's wife, she liked it.
I guess I'll try something similar with the urns. It's crude, but with a good deal of care, it will hopefully be effective given the tools/skills available. ...
If you could do that well enough seems pretty much like you answered your own question...
One last point--you can ease glue up on angled sides with either splines or biscuits. You can cut splines on the TS by simply lowering the blade and reversing the stock after the miters are cut and have the perfect complementary angle automagically...
OBTW--use a sled and you don't have a problem of the narrow edge sliding under the fence that was the problem previously w/ the ripping of the second edge. Or, turn the stock over and position the fence on the other side of the blade.
--
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"well enough" for my buddies wife *could* be a far cry from truly respectable wood joinery.

Not equipped for biscuits. Splines are an interesting idea, but I'm not really following your instructions (above) as well as I'd like.

I just built a sled similar to
http://www.youtube.com/watch?vit6MFCUobw
. The blade slot is zero-clearance: I can't tilt the blade.

My cheapo TS won't allow this.
Thanks, Peetie
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On 12/12/2011 3:56 PM, Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

For four-sided boxes--if more than four sides doesn't work as simply.
------------ Stock / \/ --------/\ __________ Table \ Blade
In the rough sketch above, the stock has been mitered and the blade now lowered and then passed over w/ the bevel against the blade. For a 45 the blade is then precisely perpendicular to the face. You can figure out ways for other angles but it isn't as trivial.
--
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Then 'tis to be an "internal spline", not visable on the finished work-piece. Neat! I'll give it a try.
Many Thanks, Peetie
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wrote:

If you are going to do thos a lot you might look into a Dubby. Seeing this guy (the inventor) do miters at tradeshows is amazing how precise he does 4, 6, 8 sided frames or boxes. Very good little sled.
http://www.in-lineindustries.com/index.html
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