Table Saw Magic - anyone built any of the jigs?

Page 2 of 2  
T9 is made by Boeshield and isn't for use with an actively used TS top. It's fine for storage times. It leaves too much of a film. Use wax instead.
dave
Phil wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
correction: T-9 is made for PMS Products of Michigan. The trademark Boeshield is licensed to the Boeing Company.
Bay Area Dave wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
T9 is NOT a 3M product
John
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a "special" was made from Johnson's. Harder'n a rock and almost bulletproof. When you finally find Johnson's wax, do this: (all measuring by volume)
1/3 Johnsons wax 1/3 Carnuba flakes 1/3 Pure beeswax
Melt slowly in an old aluminum coffeepot (thriftstore $1.00) on a hotplate OUTSIDE!! When melted together, remove from heat and blend in enough pure turpentine to make a paste again. (I often do the melting/hardening thing several times til I get the consistency I want.) What you're looking for is a barely workable paste--(hard) This stuff goes on stiff and needs to be buffed out almost immediately. You can give yourself more time by adding more turp. Once you get this stuff rubbed in everywhere--miter slot, extension wings, fence rails. table top and fence surfaces, you'll have a very slippery, HARD surface that will not give you finishing problems when you drag your wood across it. My CI Delta Contractor's saw sits outside year round for the past 3yrs--right now covered by 18" of snow (tarped) and the metal surfaces show no ill effects. Spring and Fall I strip with lacquer thinner and re-apply the wax, heating surfaces somewhat with a heat gun for initial light coat, then final protective coat. Holds up well between the 100plus to minus20 degree temp swings we have here in Montana.
Roger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've always used butcher's wax. Same stuff I use for wood to wood drawer and table slide runners. Rub it on and buff it out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The auxiliary rip fence is also in the current Popular Woodworking (Feb '04). It fits on top of a Bessy clone, and is bolted to the flat top of he fence. There is a picture of the jig with the rip fence sled here:
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/images/features/tolpintwo.jpg
The main jig is the shorter L shaped piece on top of the fence. The sled is the tall piece in front; it hooks over and slides along the auxiliary fence. The book shows many other attachments and uses for the basic fence.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N -
The universal fence is cradled between the two sides of the bies fence. I wanted a better way to secure it so I put a barbed threaded insert into a cleat and then sheet metal screwed the cleats, one in the front and one in the back, to the bies. I measured off the center point for everything so that now the fence will mount facing either to the left or right side of the fence using the same mounting holes. Might be handy for raised panels...
I am putting another piece of wood down the center of the top of the bies fence, in between the cleats. It has a t track in it so that I can mount and move my board buddies around. The channel arrangement also gets sheet metal screwed to the top of the bies. This provides additional support for the center of the universal fence and makes it easier to shim it square to the TS table. I'm not one for drilling holes in fences unneccesarily, but I *really* like where Tolpin is going with his jigs - I've solved problems in my head with his jigs that I haven't built yet... Did that make sense? You get the idea...
Several of the auxillary fences that are used with the universal fence work with a slip fit using UHMW plastic. I may or may not have any left, or I'll use laminate strips.
Toplin is a big fan of T track, destaco clamps and assorted knobs, hold downs and the like. I've found the best price for T track at Grizzly - 8 bucks for 36" vs. 13 at woodcraft. For hardware knobs and the like, Grizzly has better prices too. Harbor freight had a good price on De staco clamps, but I have also got 'em on ebay at decent price. If you have any surplus stores in your area, I'd check there....
My only crit of Tolpin's book is that it would have been more convenient to have an appendix of all his jigs. As is, they pop up in the book according to the task being taught and so there is some flipping about. The index is a bit lacking as well. This may be more a point for his editors...
I also have "The Table Saw Book" by Kelly Mehler, and would recommend it, but I'd still put Tolpin's TSM at the top of the list.
My 02...
John Moorhead Lakeport CA

~6"
jigs
book,
the
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.