Table Saw Lubricant?

Howdy.
Out of interest, what do you all use to lubricate the innards of your table saw mechanisms/trunnions etc.
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com Over 50 woodworking product reviews online! ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Spaceage Ceramic Bandsaw Guides - Infinity "Dadonator" Stacked Dado Set - GMC LS950SPJ Scrolling Jigsaw - Triton Powered Respirator - Veritas Power Tool Guide - Ryobi 6" Grinder/Stand Combo ------------------------------------------------------------
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I use trewax. I believe that any good paste wax would be good. Leaves no sticky residue that picks up sawdust. And that makes it easy to clean up.
Carl Stigers Carl's Custom Woodworking New London, CT
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I use a small baby jar 3/4th full of paste wax (Butcher's) and one small tube of dry graphite (Auto store), mix it in the wax slowly while you add a drop of mineral spirits to the wax so you can stir it. Only a drop or two is all that's needed. If you get to much, don't worry and just leave the lid off the jar and the mineral spirits will evaporate off.
I use an old toothbrush to apply the wax/graphite mixture to all the gears etc. Wax alone will certainly work but I've always added the graphite. One small jar of this will last you a long time.
Bob S.

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So, how frequently does one need to go through this process? And how far down should one count on disassembling the saw? In other words, is this an all-day process, with full realignment afterwards? Or 15 minutes, then good to go?
Patriarch
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Patriarch asks:

Depends a lot on the saw. Some saws go for years without extra lube, in light use. Others need lube often with modest use. And the particular saw dictates the needs. Disassembly shouldn't be needed, but...you need to use one toothbrush to clean the area, another full of wax or wax and graphite to lubricate. Some saws make it easy to reach the spots you need to reach, while others don't. I prefer to use an engine crane (or a couple helpers) to turn the saw sideways or upside down, as needed, IF needed. For those of you with good knees and small bellies, a contractor's saw will usually allow you to slip underneath with a flashlight to check things out and do the work.
Charlie Self "If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to." Dorothy Parker
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I always get out the owner's manual and follow that. It's been a long time since I've done a table saw tune up, and I've only done one since I bought the PM66 12 years ago. I would not use anything not recommended by the manufacturer.
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Phisherman responds:

For Powermatic 66s, use Lubriplate. That's what goes on at the factory.
Charlie Self "If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to." Dorothy Parker
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Bob, {and all} { - note how the 'original' poster was a Editor for an on-line tool review entity . . . do we all get to share the bucks for the tip ?? }
Anyhow, I agree with the idea of mixing in a 'dry' lubricant along with the wax. The theory being that as/when the wax 'evaporates' the 'dry' is still working . . . also you need less of the 'dust capturing' material. HOWEVER, I have found graphite to be a mess, no matter how careful you are. Whit I use is something called 'Motor Mica'. It is a dry white lube, almost identical to graphite. I have a pint/pound can that has lasted for YEARS. Got it from a reloaders supply outfit . . . used to remove impurities from molten bullet metal.
Regards, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

a
SNIP
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Use BoeShield T9 for the innerds. Drys to a waxy consistancy that does NOT catch nor hold dust/chips/etc
One of the machinery books I have read recommended spray White Lithium grease for the gears/trunnions, but so far I have been very happy with the BoeShield T9
I know some folks recommend T9 for the cast iron table top as well, but it really does NOT make the table top SLICK like a good paste wax. Sure, I gotta re-apply the pastewax about once a month, but so far NO rust with that schedule and the paste wax (modified by adding EXTRA carnuba into the Johnson's paste wax)
John On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 00:05:32 GMT, "Carl Stigers"

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I use "Johnson's Paste Wax", same stuff mom used on the floors. RJ

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I recently lubed the screws on my contractor-type table saw. I used a very small dab of white grease on each. Things are within easy access...I just pick up the saw and lay it on the workbench. I also did a quick cleaning with the vac. Cheers. Joe

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Woodcrafter wrote:

Outer's Gunslick Graphite Lube
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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