Table saw jig revisited


I had posted recently about making a jig to joint with a table saw and ensure straight cuts. Well, no one in my local area has a toggle clamp. Would my idea with the angle iron and welding nuts to it work? (Welding small nuts to the top then using bolts through these nuts to hold the board down?) (I will be workign mostly with 12 inch and under wood right now.)
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What about this?
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb /
I built this fence for my router table and jointing with it produced good results.
http://store.woodstore.net/rofe.html
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stryped wrote: > I had posted recently about making a jig to joint with a table saw and > ensure straight cuts. Well, no one in my local area has a toggle clamp.
You have something against mail order?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Or even a couple of screws while he waits?
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dadiOH
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wrote:

http://froogle.google.com/froogle?hl=en&lr=&safe=off&rls=SNYC,SNYC:2004-17,SNYC:en&q=toggle%20clamp&sa=N&tab=wf
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stryped wrote:

I'm not sure that your going to get the answer your looking for since the advice you were given in your initial post was good advice. One thing you didn't make clear was if your table saw has no fence or if the fence it does have is not perfectly straight. If the latter, is the problem that it doesn't lock down good? Let me reemphasize that if you have the straightest fence in the world, if your saw blade isn't 1)sharp, 2)can't be made perfectly parallel to the fence or visa-versa, or 3) can't be aligned truly perpendicular to the table, your not going to be able to produce a surface on the saw that is suitable for joining to another surface. You'll end up with a weak, poorly aligned joint at best.
Even, if you have a piece of angle iron or aluminum or whatever, how are you going to ensure that the edge is perfectly straight? Another bit of missing information is what width and thickness of boards are you planning on jointing? Jointing refers to mating two board surfaces along the edge grain as opposed to butting or mating the end surfaces together. Do you own a router and a straight bit? Too much missing information.
Martie
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the welds will distort the angle. if you must use angle, get some that is thick enough to tap your threads directly into.
the only thing that iron lends to the jig is a level of stiffness that is difficult to achieve without a large amount of wood. you certainly don't need that much stiffness for this straightening/tapering jig, and the weight and certain disaster should the iron contact the teeth of your blade are enough to rule it out in my shop.
for kicks, try to do this entirely out of wood- no nails or screws even, just glue. make the toggle. be inventive. this is the kind of jig that you should be making as the need for it comes up, out of scraps that you have on hand. you get extra points if it works the way you were imagining it the first time you make it, and you get points off if you spend any money making it.
think about it: the basis of this jig is a straight reference edge a bit longer than the board you want to work on, wide enough to support the workpiece and stay straight while feeding it through the saw, thick enough to take the forces of clamping your workpiece to it......
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Amen, brother.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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stryped wrote:

You can easily make a clamp for your purpose. On your carrier board (the one which has a straight edge and upon which you are going to place the board to be straightened)...
1. Fasten a 1x2 crosswise at the front end. This is a "stop block".
2. Drill a 1/4" hole 3-4" from the straight edge and at a distance from the front about 6" farther than the boards to be straightened. Countersink that hole on the underside and run a 1/4" flathead machine screw up through the hole.
3. Now get a piece of wood about 12" long and 2-3" wide. Cut a 1/4" through slot in it lengthwise in the middle stopping about 2" from the end. This is a "clamp".
4. Lay the board to be straightened on the carrier board butting the front end against the stop block and the board to be straightened as you want it. Put the slot in the clamp over the machine screw from #2. Move the clamp so the front edge is maybe 1" on top of the board to be straightened. Put a fender washer and a wing nut on the machine screw. Tighten the wing nut so the clamp holds down the board to be straightened.
You can modify both the stop block and clamp by using thicker stock and cutting the part that will be touching the board to be straightened at a 45 degree angle. That way, they will restrict movement both lengthwise and vertically; no need to position the clamp over the board to be straightened.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
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