Table Saw Help

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Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in

I assume it's actually the splitter you're concerned about? That's can be a valid issue - when I started woodworking I'd take the guard and splitter off maybe once per year. Now, even tho the guard is only on the saw maybe 20% of the time, I'm frequently putting it on and taking it off (I use sleds for crosscutting, dadoing, etc, which have their own guards built on, so the factory guard/splitter is only on the saw when I'm ripping).
John
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On 6/19/2016 12:40 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

I checked the alignment of the blade when I first got the saw. The blade was parallel to the slot. I did have to do some adjustment for the fence.
Dan
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I got one of the last of the TS3660s. It's been excellent. Very well thought out design and well made. I don't know what they were thinking with the replacement. The 3650/3660 addressed the big issue with contractor-style saws, blade alignment, with an adjustment system that makes the process trivially easy.
With the 4511/4512 that's gone and to make matters worse a lot of the saws were sold with the adjustment holes incorrectly placed so that it was not possible to achieve blade alignment without going after the parts with a file or Dremel. Apparently this was addressed in mid-2013. There's also a safety recall--don't use a dado set on a 4511 until you've read the recall notice and checked serial numbers. <https://www.ridgid.com/Media/Default/documents/safetynotices/R4511 _PR.pdf>
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On 06/18/2016 4:55 PM, Meanie wrote: ...

It's "RIDGID" like the pipe wrench folk -- who altho they licensed the name they have nothing to do with the product...
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wrote:

The saws I've seen without the "motor sticking out the back" have had universal motors. You're much better off with an induction motor, even it sticks out the back. You'd probably never have a bearing problem again, and if you did, induction motors tend to be pretty standard and easily replaced.
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On 6/18/2016 2:38 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Well that or go for a "new" portable bench top.
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Ah, I wouldn't agree with that point :-)
I'm not a big fan of benchtop saws. I think a full size saw gives you more power, more precision, more durability, is more stable, and overall safer. So I wouldn't recommend a benchtop unless someone was very constrained on space, or actually needed to tote the saw places other than a shop.
John
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On Sun, 19 Jun 2016 15:54:36 +0000, John McCoy wrote:

Well, there is an alternative with a bit of luck - an *old* contractors saw from Delta. It's small enough to be called a benchtop, but it weighs a ton and the motor is external. I have the 1948 model and it's very compact and built like a tank. Even has an overhead blade guard. Like all saws it needs a better miter gauge and a sliding table.
There is one flaw - the blade is fixed and the table moves, but I seldom need to move it. Here's a link to a picture and no, I don't have the jointer.
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/images/7063-A.JPG
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On 6/19/2016 10:54 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Well I'm not a fan either, I use a 700lb cabinet saw. But if you seldom use a TS a bench top makes more sense. It all depends on how much you use it and what you are cutting with it. Furniture, probably not. Bird houses, not a big deal.
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On 6/18/2016 1:17 PM, Leon wrote:

Good point.
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On 6/18/2016 10:19 AM, Meanie wrote:

I may start a war, with this comment.
I have an old 1968 Craftsman 10' table saw. This was the high end craftsman, not the elcheapo. I Have been using it for about 30 years and it is still quite functional.
The Craftsman has a cast iron table with aluminum wings, giveing me about a 36 inch square working area. I did have a problem with the 1hp capacitor start motor that a repair man fixed for a couple of dollars and showed my how to fix it in the future. (Clean our the area of the motor where the capacitor is, and keep it clean.)
Because Craftsman table saws are looked down on you should be able to get a good deal on the saw.
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On Saturday, June 18, 2016 at 2:07:19 PM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

I have one about the same vintage with cast iron extensions. Nice saw, but I wish it was bit older (like the '40s or '50).
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On 6/18/2016 3:07 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

Agreed, older Craftsman tools are great, unfortunately, my mindset stays focused on the last few decades and current stuff, thus, leaving apprehension in it's wake.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Not with me you won't...

Me too. I replaced the motor on mine years ago and I also replaced my cast iron wings with wings I built myself out of cherry for the banding and MDF for the surface material. At the same time I installed a new fence system that gives me 24" on each side of the blade. I tore it down a year or two ago and replaced the arbor bearing as well as installing new pulleys and a link belt. I also installed a paddle switch located at my left knee cap so it is easy to shut off at the completion of a cut. I invested in a Woodworker II at the same time. It's a wonderful tool at this time. It was always a good saw, but it's just a thing of beauty now. Oh - i had also invested the time to align the blade to the miter slot several years ago.

No reason to look down on the cast iron saws - they are good saws that can be turned into great saws for little cost.
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email.me:

Y'know, that's a good idea. Dunno that I'd use cherry, but I have half a sheet of MDF stuck in a corner somewhere crying for a project to use it on. And slightly wider wings would be useful.
John
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On 6/18/2016 2:07 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

My first of 3 TS's was a new 1983 Craftsman with cast iron top and steel solid extensions. When I sold it I replaced the extensions with formica covered extensions and a 36" Jet Exacta rip fence. It was a decent saw after all of that. The 1 hp motor did give me grief when ripping 3/4" plywood if myself and a helper did not guide steady enough or slow enough.
After using it for 16 years I traded up to a Jet cabinet saw. and about 14 years got the industrial SawStop.
All three saws were/are on mobile bases and I cannot stress how much a mobile base on a TS makes close quarters work areas less troublesome.
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On 6/18/2016 8:48 PM, Leon wrote:

I first came across mobile desk when I was working in the laboratory. We had many instruments and being mobile could be clustered as needed.
I currently have my table saw and work bench on wheels. The work bench was made to be the same height as the table saw so it can be positioned to be an out feed table when you are ripping on the table saw.
At other times the work bench is on the operator side of the table saw and is a staging area for the pieces to be cut. I make a lot of stretchers and picture frames. This means that if you are making a lot of frames or stretchers you are going to have a pile of pieces to be cut. It is nice to have every thing so you can reach it with a slight turn.
I have even used the work bench to change the ceiling lights, as it can be rolled under the light that needs to be change.
The work bench can be rolled over to the car or lawn tractor when you are working on them.
When you change project every thing not needed is rolled to it storage position.
Point being with everything on wheels you have a very flexible work area that can be quite usable in a limited amount of space.
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The counter point to that is that, when you start a new project everything is in the wrong place and you have to move it all before you can start (which is exactly what I do) :-)
To Meanie's point about the motor sticking out the back of a contractor style saw - this is the one time you have to worry about it. With the saw on a mobile base it's easy to mis-judge how far back the motor is, and bang it into things while moving the saw.
John
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John McCoy wrote:

Yeah, maybe, but that's not really a big issue to overcome. That seems like a reach to justify worrying about the motor hanging off the back. I have found that I can certainly deal with that issue.
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email.me:

Yes, you get used to allowing for it quickly enough. And it's the only issue I've ever experienced with the contractor style motor mount.
John
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